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I have had my 12 yr old TW for almost a year. He has had at least 4 incidents of bleeding from the nose. It is not very much. I would say a trickle. Sometimes its like he has a little bit of a runny nose with blood in it. It has always resolved quickly. I wipe his nose a few times and it has stopped. I board him, so I can’t judge if it lasts more than the hours I am with him, but the barn staff and other boarders pay close attention. He is black, but has a wide white blaze and it is very easy to see anything on his pink nose. No one has ever told me they noticed it unless they were with me when it was happening and I pointed it out.
They just called me from the barn and sent a photo. It is worse than normal, but was drying up when they saw it.
I mentioned it to the vet. She said not to worry too much. He may just be sensitive to the heat and dust. The paddocks are sandy and very dusty (year round) as is the arena we worked in this afternoon.
I try not to be dramatic, but there is a horse at the barn that bleeds from the nose constantly. He has had surgery to get rid of a sinus hemangioma twice. It keeps coming back and its obstructing one side badly again. Poor thing can’t breathe enough for exercise. Its hard to watch and listen to.
I know the only true way to know is to have him scoped, but is that overboard for something that has happened 5x in a year? Would something serious grow faster?
There has been no pattern related to how long or hard he has exercised. And it has never happened on a trail ride. We ride 3-5 hours, but not on dry, dusty trails. I would think anything serious would manifest after 5 hours. We don’t run all over, but he moves along at a good clip on trails. It is definitely exercise.
Any experiences and advice are greatly appreciated!
 

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Sounds pretty serious to me and getting more frequent... :frown_color:
You say it is exercise induced means to me you need a scoping done like they do to Thoroughbreds who bleed to identify why and where...
If your vet puts you off...well, if me.. there would be a new vet.
Bleeding is a hemorrhage that you only see a part of...
What and how much are you not seeing is my concern...

Yea, no...
Consult a vet who has racetrack experience as they may be able to diagnose with less testing and help work a solution for you.
The fact you have knowledge of at least 4 incidents in a years time on your new horse is to me concerning, like very concerning, this may be a something and it may be heading toward something major, or not...
The only way you are going to know for sure...is a vet and scoping.
To be "brushed-off"...to me that is just wrong.
Your horse is not anothers, nor is it guaranteed this or that till a exam and diagnostics take place.
:runninghorse2:...
jmo...
 

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Yeah, I tend to agree with HLG - I'd want a second opinion myself, and a bit more professional one than 'try not to worry too much'... What the?? It may be nothing, or of little concern as your vet has implied, but I've never heard of repeated nosebleeds except in racehorses, who commonly suffer lung hemorrhaging due to the extreme nature of the work they're made to do.

I can recall reading something about nutritional deficiencies causing weak blood vessels, but can't recall details sorry. Other than, as horses(& all animals aside from us apes & guineapigs) produce their own vitamin C, I don't think they're prone to scurvy, so that's unlikely the cause.
 

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Nosebleeds can be associated with guttural pouch mycosis.
You really need to get a vet involved
This was exactly my thought.

If it's NOT related to exercise, it seems unlikely to be pulmonary hemorrhage (as bleeding in racehorses commonly is). I would be concerned about guttural pouch infection or something dental-related. If he was mine, I would be doing the scope.
 

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I'm really just responding so I'll be tagged in updates to this thread. I don't have nearly the level of horse experience of others here and I'm not a veterinarian, but I have been around horses a lot and I've never personally seen a horse have recurrent nosebleeds, so I'm interested to see how this turns out.
 

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You need a vet who's going to find cause of nose bleeding. If gutteral pouch mycosis horse will have a fatal bleeding. It's not something to wait and see on horse can literally bleed to death.
 

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This should absolutely be seen by a veterinarian as soon as possible. I don't mean to scare you but a fungal infection in the guttural pouches (guttural pouch mycosis as others mentioned above) the horse can bleed out in under an hour if the infection reaches the carotid artery. There are any other sensitive structures in the guttural pouches that can be irreversibly damaged. Treatment is most successful if you catch the infection early. Other causes of the bleeding include an "ethmoid hematoma" which sounds like the cause of bleeding for your friends horse but is not terribly common. Exercise induced pulmonary hemorrhage (EIPH) is a possibility but is rarely seen outside of very intense exercise - most frequently seen in TB racehorses or barrel horses. Dusty environments may be a cause of nasal discharge, however, the discharge should only be clear and never bloody if this is the case.

Please get this seen ASAP!
 

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Gutteral pouch infections are very rare. So while that is possible, it isn't the most likely reason.

One of my horses had nose bleeds. She had sinusitis. A course of antibiotics cleared it right up. She was an older horse and her immune system probably wasn't that great.

As a child someone's horse had nosebleeds - i don't remember what the diagnosis was, but the horse seemed fine the next day. I believe dental issues can cause nosebleeds as well.

Getting your horse scoped is probably a good idea. I'm debating on having one of mine scoped. She sometimes has noisy breathing during work. My vet recommended taking her to an equine hospital and working her on a treadmill to diagnose it, but I'm not sure a diagnosis will help us, especially if I'm unwilling to do surgery... It doesn't seem to get worse or better and it is not like she's a racehorse.

I don't believe scoping itself is that expensive but i believe it has been about ten years since I've had it done. Call around and discuss prices with your vet beforehand.
 

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Get a vet out and have them run blood work as well. We lost a mare to Liver Failure in February - and one of the indicators was a nose bleed. She had had one before (just a small trickle) that we chalked up to extremely cold dry air. When it happened again she was already being treated at an equine hospital for a liver infection.
 

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You need a vet-- tooth abscesses, guttural pouch infections, sarcoid tumors on the salivary glands, sinus problems, inhaled irritants, etc. can all cause nosebleeds.

Nosebleeds in horses are never a 'wait and see'. You need to have this horse scoped and rule out serious issues. Having come upon a horse that bled to death from a guttural pouch infection, it's not something I wish on anyone.
 

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If there is no pattern (as in related to heat and exercise) then you really do want a second opinion. Have you checked for scratching or abrasions just inside the nostril to determine if there is a physical (outside his body) cause?



I have a mare that is a bleeder. That is why she didn't make it on the track. We were not told of her condition until after the fact. We did confirm with our vet and she is not worked at all in extreme temps or exercised excessively. As yours seems to have no rhyme or reason time to dig deeper for the cause.
 
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