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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was so excited to work on stuff today that we had done during my lesson two days ago. My horse finally seems fully healed from a head wound, and I go to get him today and he has a gash on his back leg. The head wound seemed to be from him scratching on something and getting gouged, and there was a splinter in it. This leg gash I have no idea but it doesn't seem like a bite or a kick, it's very much a cut like he sliced himself on something. He's in a small herd of geldings that rotate between a paddock and various pastures. He tends to play a lot with the other horses and tends to have lots if nicks and bite marks that heal within a day or two, but are fairly constant. The barn owners say he is the main instigator in the play and I've seen it go both ways. Besides the play injuries, I don't understand why my horse seems to be the only one getting injured on various things in the paddock or pasture. Like I feel like if I actually find what he hurt himself on, its not an issue for the other horses, why would they put effort into fixing or removing it. My horse has been new to this place for about four months and had been in a stall previously at least for the last year, beyond that I don't know. How do I know if it's the paddock/pasture is a problem or my horse is just accident prone? So sick of constant injuries even if they are quickly healed. But I know he prefers the heard to a stall. Can't have both I guess? :faceshot:
 

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Don't you just love that?? No advice from me, just sympathy. I have one horse in my herd that's often hurting herself, while the others have never. And in previous places, I've had to keep my horses in some pretty... ratty paddocks with junk & barbed wire & other very... not ideal things. Thankfully I didn't have Miss Clumsy Clod then. One place I remember there were about 15 horses on the place, none of mine or the property owner's horses ever hurt themselves, then a friend brought her horse there... & ended up costing her quite a bit in vet bills as her horse kept getting hurt.

I also have a 'Houdini' (never buy a yellow horse - they can get out of anything!) & I used to hate that at these places with very... average fencing, my horse would be the only one that ever got out - the others you could string a rope around some trees & they'd stay in, but my boy would just walk in & out as he saw fit!
 

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I've got 9 horses. It is extremely rare for 8 of them to have so much as a scuff mark. Cutter, on the other hand, has a new ouchie every day or two. He is also the instigator in any and all roughhousing. I keep a good supply of ointments on hand.
 

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Dreama - rescue from the local dog pound. Some type of gaited horse mix of unknown history.
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Second ApuetsoT's advice on walking the pasture, couldn't hurt. But as others have told some horses are just... accident prone. Dreama is a dainty lady when it comes to that sort of thing; she's not managed to hurt herself in our care yet, granted the family I board with takes particular pride in their property being well-kept and clean. But their quarter horse mare... she does things that don't even make sense. Like trying to beat the other horses through the gate and tearing down a fence post and slicing herself all down her side in the process. She always has some new boo-boo, usually nothing too serious but that one was pretty ugly although it healed fairly fast, it could have been worse.
 

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Imo, there's a difference when a horse is getting hurt on nice fences and flat ground, but just because the other horses aren't falling in the pile of rusty nails doesn't mean the pole of rusty nails is ok.

My horse never gets hurt, but that doesn't stop me from taking time to clean up the paddock or notifying the BO of nails sticking out or loose fixtures, ect.

If your horse is getting hurt on padded walls, then it would be unreasonable to ask them to refence entire areas just for you. But you're paying the BO to keep your horse in a safe environment, so hold them to that.
 

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Definitely walk the pasture, but I agree that some horses are just accident prone. My Teddy is one. The big rub / cut on his withers, the only thing we could figure out was he had picked a sharp rock to roll on (he likes to roll a lot). Then he got what they thought was a bad kick on his hocks, which is a little odd because he doesn't usually get in fights. And there were other things I can't remember off the top of my head, where it wasn't like there was something dangerous in the pasture -- he just hurt himself. Having said that, I am more cautious now that he is mine, about picking up junk I find in their pasture. I wouldn't have worried so much if it had just been Pony and Moonshine.
 
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Last injury my mare got, she was tied up short, to a tree only slightly lower than her wither height. I heard scrabbling & turned to find she must have gone to scratch her face & got a back foot stuck over the rope! Of course it was the same leg she already had a rope burn on.

Yeah ApuetsoT I wasn't trying to imply paddocks full of crap were ok, but in some areas, there's not a lot of choice. And here at my place now, all pretty good. But while I've removed rubbish, removed barbed wire, refenced heaps for safety, I can't afford to remove & replace all the ringlock sheep fencing, so I still worry - hope electric fencing stand offs keep her out of trouble.
 

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Yeah ApuetsoT I wasn't trying to imply paddocks full of crap were ok, but in some areas, there's not a lot of choice. And here at my place now, all pretty good. But while I've removed rubbish, removed barbed wire, refenced heaps for safety, I can't afford to remove & replace all the ringlock sheep fencing, so I still worry - hope electric fencing stand offs keep her out of trouble.
I didn't have any particular post in mind, I was a thought I had earlier, but I was too sleepy to write that much in my first post.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks all! We didn't find anything when looking that would have been the right location. My trainer also said she thinks it was a kick, and that hooves can leave a slice. Then we all watched him a bit in the paddock as he proceeded to be a complete butthead to a couple horses who were clearly saying no I don't want to play. At least they get rotated out to the pasture everyday where they just graze and don't play as much. Oh well, time to stock up on first aid supplies. 🤦‍♀️
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
And today he had tons of new bite marks. He was apparently fighting with another horse, or more like getting his *** kicked by the other horse. I think my boy is just not very smart about being in a herd. This may take some time, he's only been there 5 months, and some horses come and go, so the herd changes a bit as horses come in and out of training.
 
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