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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So when I put her out in the pasture I can't get the lead rope off her before she runs! Im quite little (5'3", weighs just over 100 lbs 16 yo girl with not much muscle) I can't hold on to her! And now after her doing this a couple times im a little rattled. How do I get her to stop running?
 

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Oh my mare was literally dangerous in the field but with help from the guys here myy mom can even let her out and that was not long ago i couldnt.

Iused to attach a long line to her head collar and i ask her to stand nicely if she tries to run make her work! re peat this until she learns it is easier to just wait.
Also dont let her off immediately maybe pick up her feet or back her up a few steps etc just so she knows your still in charge at that point.

It doesnt take long until they just figure it out.

I also evaluated her ground manners in generalshe had gotten bargy but i was used to it so i didnt care. However i worked on these to now i actually can lead my horse!!

Repition and preserverence are the key
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Well the thing is I get out of the barn and into the pasture and I walk her in a few circles then she just takes off with the lead line still on her.
 

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Maybe you could take her into the pasture then lead her out again, then back into the pasture until you want to let her go, keeping her guessing.
Or you could try taking her to the pasture then tie her to one of the fence posts for a few min. then let her go.
Or maybe take a bucket of oats or someother treat out with you that she only gets after you have removed the lead (and halter if that's what you do, I know some people keep halters on their horses in the pasture). Then she has a good bride to stay with you instead of running off.
Just some ideas for inspiration.
Good luck and hope this gets better for you.
 

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I would work her and ride her until she is extremely tired and calm and then when you are going to let her go, face her backwards and take off her halter. I don't know if this helps, but it worked for me...
 

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In this case, I strongly suggest a chain - not so much because the horse needs it, but because it's quite simply your size that's the problem. Most suggestions won't help you because if you're that small, she's just going to drag you anywhere she pleases. If she refuses to respect you, I'd get a chain over/under her nose and gave her a few good pops with it to remind her she NEEDS to pay attention to you.

Regardless of size however, you absolutely need to master the power of leverage. There is no such thing as wrestling down a 1000 pound animals regardless of HOW much you weight - it may be slightly harder for a horse to pull my 200 pounds around, but trust me, I am nothing when it comes to brute strength. For smaller people, it's even more important that you master leverage because I can use my weight to throw a horse off balance but you small people don't even have that.

A horse with it's nose tipped towards you has no power - end of story. If I am lunging a strong horse, all I do is drop back and draw the line across my hip - it plants my weight, and the minute you force that nose towards you, they lose their power. The same goes for leading - when all else fails, stand at the ribcage, crank the nose to your arm and spin circles with her. I often keep my other hand on the hip to ensure I have a steady place. You also have to be obviously quick on your feet which is why I suggested a chain initially - if you don't know how to use this method, you can get tossed sky high and I've seen it happened.

Do your best to practice some leverage work, but to escape danger right now, I'd suggest putting some bite onto her nose and making her listen to you.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Yeah I put the chain on her nose, I backed her up and moved her forward and snapping it at her when she wasn't paying attention. Im going to try tipping her nose more and walk her in more circles. Thanks!
 

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You make it sound like she'll lead in fine, its when you make her do circles that she gets sick of circling and takes off, correct?
Can you just lead her in, immediately turn her to face the gate, remove the halter and let her go? I'm not understanding why your making her do circles, this gives her the chance and angle to bolt off because A. She can and B. She'd rather bolt off than circle dance with you, she wants to eat!

If she doesn't give you any chance at all to remove her halter before she runs off then lead her in, out, in, out, in, out until she is willing to give you a second. I however am one to walk them in un-clipping the lead as they walk threw the gate so they can boogie as they'd like.

If she is fresh from being locked in a stall for 12 hours well then, there is your problem all together but no need for me to go into my rant against stalls :)
 

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as MacabreMikolaj said is probably what i would do. and if putting the chain over the nose then use it like a stud chain. put it under her top lip along her teeth. she'll think twice before running off then. this is what we have to do to our VERY highstrung mare who likes to rear when you trim her feet. she knows what the stud chain is and as soon as you put it on(you don't even have to apply pressure) she will stand straight still and not move a muscle lol
 

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I think you need to start where macabre suggested.

I am guessing this is one of those issues that the horse is just being impatient about being released? Start practicing releasing her in a small area, that way if she gets away from you, you can keep her butt moving, and be able to catch her up once she is worked for a bit. Teach her that just because she 'gets away' doesn't necessarily mean she's 'gotten away'...once you catch her up again, take her out the gate, and back in, and start over.
 

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One thing that has worked great for me in this situation, in all instances I've used it in is this:

Put one lead with a chain over the nose on the horse, and a second regular lead rope on the bottom of the halter on the regular ring.

Do you have feed set out for the horse prior to bringing it into the paddock? Hay even? If so, stop pre-feeding this horse forever. Make the horse know that you control the feed. This could be one reason that the horse thinks it needs to race off-- to get food.

Back to the dual lead lines: In this situation you'll first take the horse into the paddock JUST to be in there, and then take the horse out right away. Have someone hold the gate for you so you can exit smoothly. Walk in, walk out. Do this several times.

When the horse can do this smoothly, walk in, halt for a few seconds, and walk out, same thing. You are working towards the horse standing calmly and assuming it'll be taken directly out again. Use the regular (non chained) lead as the primary, and the chained lead for reinforcement and to bring attention back to you.

When you get to the point where you are going to practice releasing the horse, hold firmly onto the chained lead (do NOT wrap it around your arm or leg or body under any circumstances) and you'll be unhooking the regular lead first. I suggest wearing gloves. Here is the process:


1. Walk the horse into the paddock, and make a small circle so that your back is to the gate, and the horse is facing you and the gate. You need to have plenty of space to get the heck out of the way if the horse pulls a fast one and spins around to take off bucking. Chances of this are very good-- and honestly that is alright... as long as the horse learns that it needs to stand still for release.

2. Tell the horse whoa. Ask him to stand for a second. He'll expect you to walk back out the gate since you've practiced it a thousand times. Instead, reach your hand up to release the normal lead. Be prepared for the horse to pull and fly, and the second he tries, give the horse a huge crack with the lead over his nose. It'll startle him and make him stop for a minute. Yell whoa, etc. Walk back out of the paddock. You have to be very fast, and anticipate his movements.

3. Rinse, repeat. It will take diligent practice over many days (possibly weeks), but it can be overcome, even for someone as little as you.

Obviously if he has learned to stand still for undoing the regular lead, and he's fine, let him go. To do this, I'd re attach the plain lead, and take off the chain first, and then release the plain lead.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
well we keep the halters on, since there isnt anything for them to get caught on (no trees or anything) I've only done the circling 4 or 5 times and the first few times she was perfect... well for her anyway, they go outside almost everyday (just if it is raining or snowing alot) On school days they go out side at 3:30 and come ing at 6:30, They come in the barn really good. On week ends they are out all day. she is an ex racehorse and wasn't really taught to stand for minutes just to be set free (Im a REALLY slow person, it takes me a bit longer to react to things lolol I dont have a mental disability im just slow) I'll try the in and out of the gate but today my nerves just couldn't handle another runaway! so i tied her to a post thing and she was really good about in She only pulled 3 times and figured it out. But I am going to try out all the suggestions!
 
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