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How can I teach him that he can not do whatever he wants and that I lead him (and not opposite)?
*instant* consequences, for 'good' and 'bad' behaviour. Be consistent about what you will be expecting from him.

How can I improve his balance?
Again, without knowing what the problem is... Perhaps you can tell us where in the world you are(for the sake of internet security, just the general region...)? Then others here might have some suggestions for good 'professionals' if they know the area.

And sad to say, hoof care is something you can't just trust any farrier to do/understand well. Best to put that on the priority list of things you should learn about for yourself. Of course there are some fantastic farriers around, but there are many poor ones, who don't really understand hoof balance & function, so just because you've had the horse trimmed recently & the farrier didn't express concern for anything, doesn't necessarily mean his hooves are in good shape. It is also possible he could be sore/tripping *because* of the trim. While you can't take anything just from pics & info on a forum as anything like a 'diagnosis', you could post some pics of him & his hooves for critique in the health/hoofcare part of the forum if you like. If you want to do that, check out the link in my signature line for what's needed for a 'hoof critique'.
 

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You have some really great points there Loosie. However my concern is this part:


And when need be, make it difficult/uncomfortable for him to do the wrong thing, with *instant* punishment - make sure it doesn't work for him to do it. It could be an arm wave or elbow jab if he gets too close(you're not hitting out at him, he just got *himself* in the way), could be a jerk on the bit, or a smack to the rump to get him moving forward, when he starts to put his head down. If your timing is good, the punishment quits & the horse is reinforced the instant he stops whatever, and you're consistent with your rules, you're as gentle as possible BUT as firm as necessary to be effective, then the horse will learn and I believe it's fair punishment.


I understand exactly what you mean and so will many who read it. BUT I have learnt over time that it has never been about punishing the horse so much as getting my own timing right and recognizing the instant the horse capitulates and reacting accordingly. What we are talking about here is teaching the horse through FEEL which only comes through time or to speed up the process, through watching someone with great feel explaining the signs that they are seeing and interpreting the horses body language i.e. a good trainer/mentor. For a complete novice to try to do what you suggest could possibly be a recipe for disaster.
 
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Many horses do not lunge to the right because we always do things from the left and, it is easier for most people to hold the line in the left hand and use the whip with the right hand.

A lot of people do not bother to teach them to go right.

Horses might be stiffer on one rein than the other due to misalignment BUT odds are that the horse will move perfectly well to the right when loose in the field.

I would have the horse on a shorter rein and walk it in a circle to the right holding the lunge whip in my right hand and having it behind me and against the horse's quarters and gradually move away from it.
 

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Sounds like OP is inexperienced so really needs someone there in person. To show how to deal with the horse.

Helps to have someone explain it when physically there working with horse. Being most of us on here have experience with training reading written text on what to do works. But we also know the timing and feel it takes, to accomplish what needs to be done.

Op really needs someone there to help her with this horse.
 

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I understand exactly what you mean and so will many who read it. BUT I have learnt over time that it has never been about punishing the horse so much as getting my own timing right and recognizing the instant.... For a complete novice to try to do what you suggest could possibly be a recipe for disaster.
Agree 100% & did try to convey that. But for the sake of emphasis...

watching someone with great feel explaining the signs that they are seeing and interpreting the horses body language i.e. a good trainer/mentor.
& from Rambo...
Sounds like OP is inexperienced so really needs someone there in person. To show how to deal with the horse. ...
Op really needs someone there to help her with this horse.
 
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