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I am in Drill Team with my LBE horse. She is pretty good stopping in the barn at my arena and i ride with a few other people. However once she is in the huge arena at the fairgrounds with all of the other horses, she becomes almost uncontrollable using two reins and I have to do a one rein stop almost everytime to stop her. When we are doing a certain move, I can't just do a one rein stop to stop her because she will turn.

any tips?
 

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This is an experience issue...Before she thinks about continuing with this drill team, get your stop completely loose rein at home, and then take her to town a lot more and work just like you would at home until you feel good about it.
 

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If you do enough one rein stops at home, like every few strides, she will learn to stop as soon as she feels a bit of pressure on that side of her mouth until it is barely noticeable. Work at gradually lightening how much pressure it takes to stop her. Repetition is the key.
 

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Mia gets excited about riding around other horses - even just her corral mates. Over time, what is working with her is insisting on perfect stops, every stop. Her stop will probably always be worse when she is excited, so the stops at home have to be perfect. By that I mean she needs to stop from any gait in a way that shows an honest effort to stop ASAP. She needs to stop into a position with her feet in a rectangle. If not, we will back up a few steps. If other horses are around, we practice stops in the middle of our little arena and standing still watching the others work. Fidgeting means backing up or turning around and backing. A quick stop to a squared up position without fidgeting buys her praise, rubs and time watching others work...:)

Her biggest problem in the past was probably that I was tolerating sloppy stops. But if she doesn't stop with commitment when calm, then she isn't likely to stop at all when she gets wound up.

I'm a nobody rider, so I don't know if that has any relation to your horse's behavior or not. Good luck!
 

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Mia gets excited about riding around other horses - even just her corral mates. Over time, what is working with her is insisting on perfect stops, every stop. Her stop will probably always be worse when she is excited, so the stops at home have to be perfect. By that I mean she needs to stop from any gait in a way that shows an honest effort to stop ASAP. She needs to stop into a position with her feet in a rectangle. If not, we will back up a few steps. If other horses are around, we practice stops in the middle of our little arena and standing still watching the others work. Fidgeting means backing up or turning around and backing. A quick stop to a squared up position without fidgeting buys her praise, rubs and time watching others work...:)

Her biggest problem in the past was probably that I was tolerating sloppy stops. But if she doesn't stop with commitment when calm, then she isn't likely to stop at all when she gets wound up.

I'm a nobody rider, so I don't know if that has any relation to your horse's behavior or not. Good luck!
OK, I don't like to do this but I must nag you a bit.
Please stop saying you are a nobody rider. You are Mia's rider. You offer advice that is spot on & has worked for you. Tried & true. You admit to mistakes but you also found ways to fix them. You've improved your horse & yourself proving you are not a nobody rider.
So you ARE a somebody rider.
Rant over :wink:
 

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What Saddlebag said, plus, your horse is telling you that trying to stop her with two reins doesn't work. It's ONE rein for control, two reins for communication.
 

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How about seat for control and reins as the emergency brake:wink:
 

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She wants to run through your hands? Back her OFF your hands. Don't play nice unless she does. That doesn't mean yank her face off, that means ask her with the softest, most relaxed rein ever...If she doesn't, increase the pressure until she stops and make her back up ten or fifteen feet like you MEAN it. I don't mean a sissy back up either, I mean back her up immediately and like there's a million dollars on the line and you're in a race with a reining horse.

Then relax. Let her stand for a few moments. Go on off again. Doing it at the walk/trot/ then lope helps. Eventually you don't even have to touch her face.
 

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If you've got the mind, you've got true control, but as far as aids go, it's the whole corridor of aids: seat, legs, then one rein last. Two reins makes an out-of-control horse more claustrophic & apt to run off due to the pain.
 

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If you've got the mind, you've got true control, but as far as aids go, it's the whole corridor of aids: seat, legs, then one rein last. Two reins makes an out-of-control horse more claustrophic & apt to run off due to the pain.
This I disagree with.

Two reins is a reinforcement que, not a snatch and yank and pull cue. If a horse is in pain from being touched with the reins, it won't matter if it is one rein or two. If the horse is claustaphobic, it will run away from the one rein pressure because you have managed to "open the door" to the rein you aren't using. Seen a lot of colts improperly taught to do a one rein stop who will run sideways like that.


On top of this you have zero hope of ever getting a straight stop if you only use one rein the entire time. You will get a horse who bends, blows their hip out, and sure you might get a stop but there's no balance, no finesse, and no hind end drive which the OP will absolutely need if she is going to do drill team. You can't have a horse just flopping into a one rein stop, and if you can't get a horse stopped with two reins (Actually, no reins for that matter) there is a hole in your training that you need to address.

If you pull back on both reins and this horse runs off like a rocket, head in the air, bracing, bolting mach 20...Yes, get a one rein stop and kick his hip. I mean really kick his hip. Make him bend and move, because that is a complete lack of respect and he needs to think twice about doing that again. Remember when he relaxes to always release the pressure and pat him, praise him, etc. Right thing easy, wrong thing real hard.

However, do not do to the one rein stop unless you have to, and if you know you have a dangerous bolter do NOT start off at the canter or even at the trot. Get a loose rein, STRAIGHT stop at the walk first. Then the trot. THEN the canter. By that stage you shouldn't have a horse who even thinks about running off if you have prepared him, and the second you feel even the slight inclination to a fractional increase in speed...Back him off your hands, stick his butt in the ground, and back him up. Rollback the other direction and go the other way. Take away the forward motion and make him do something else.
 

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So, are your one rein stops good? Does your horse immediately "shut down" when you pick up on either rein? If not, work her on these until that is the case. While working on those work on YOUR body language as well...breath out, feet slightly forward(knees bent to absorb shock), sit deeper and relaxed in the saddle, then que her with the rein(you can also add a real slow and relaxed "whoa" as a verbal que as well).

Once she has that down, start doing two rein stops while walking along a fence...same body cues, pull back evenly with both reins(works better two handed to start with), you can see/saw the reins to get her to stop, if she doesn't start to stop, conduct a one-rein stop into the fence, and then back her off the fence -- let her stand and think about it; repeat in both directions until she starts to think stop when you use both reins..once she stops using both reins start doing roll backs into the fence-still at a walk; stop her, back her a few steps and then turn her into the fence and repeat until she does this with only a little pressure on the reins; then start doing it a trot, once she will stop within two steps at the trot and back up a few steps with little rein pressure, proceed to faster speeds....eventually you can move off of the fence and start stopping her in different areas and at all gaits...you want her stopping of your body language more than your hands on the reins(you will get to where you only need to use rein pressure to "help" her stop once she gets worked up or nervous). I would almost always ask her to back up a step or two on every stop until you feel her start to shift her weight back after stopping...that will ensure she is always thinking -- "first I have to stop, and then I have to take a step or two back.."; once she is thinking that, you only have to back her a few steps every 5th or so stop to keep her stopping good.

As the father of a daughter on a drill team, I don't recommend using her until you can stop her with light rein pressure at any/all times...you have to be able to control the whole horse with one hand to be able to drill with a flag....
 
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