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There are a number of reasons why you bought this horse from a horse trader, and not a kill pen. Canner buyers don't buy yearlings, there's just not that much to them. And the price of horses right now is crazy high. No one is going to can a nice yearling and take meat price. Most canner buyers are also horse traders. If they can get a good buy on a horse that they know they can sell for a profit, they do.
Your's is a nice looking colt. It's not that he's thin, he looks like he just could use some "horsekeeping". I would worm him, wait a couple weeks, and do it again. I would also get his teeth checked, even yearlings can need dental help.
Then just plenty of good hay and time.
I'm not a big fan of a lot of grain, I like my horses to grow slower. It would be better if he can be turned out on a large pasture to just let run and be a horse.
He's got the possibility of growing up into a fine horse.
 

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I was very curious how he ended up at a lot with "kill pen" in the name. However, he was priced very well for being gentled, papered, and gelded. Makes me wonder "what's wrong with him " sometimes. Not sure how the whole trading thing works but I looked up his breeder and they've achieved a 50 year heritage breeding acknowledgment from AQHA. Very curious!
Probably because most canner buyers are also horse traders. If they can find a good horse at a good price, one they know they can easily resell for a profit, they will buy it. It does not mean the horse is going to the plants.
So you got papers on this colt? If he had indeed been in the pens to ship, you would not have gotten papers.
They got this colt for resell. Plus, if the breeder had sold this colt to go to the plant, they would not have supplied the registration.
You bought the colt from a horse trader.
If you got a good deal, and the papers, good for you! It was a good day.
 

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@stevenson, I have seen MANY MANY loads of canner horses, and you do not see foals, weanlings, yearlings or even 2 year olds. This is a meat industry, not a bone industry.
You are saying what a canner buyer will buy, I am saying what is shipped. Big difference. If they can get a horse at a good price, they will buy it for resale. If they can resell it for more than the plants will pay, they don't ship it. Pretty simple.
Basic facts are just that, basic facts. Its a meat industry. There is a list of things the plants WILL NOT buy, I have listed it on here several times before.
The average canner horse is over 5 years old, over 1000 pds, they MUST be healthy. They MUST walk on all 4 legs. No mares obviously in foal, no stallions, no weanlings, no foals, no yearlings, no sick horses, no skinny horses, no lame horses.
The horses are vet checked at the time of when they are picked out to make a trip. They are vet checked at the time of loading. They can be, and are stopped at ANY time and vet checked again. They are vet checked at the borders. Once at the border and passed the check, the trailer is sealed. It is not opened again until arrival at the plant and unloading.
These are the facts. You can easily check any of them you wish. Facts are facts.
 

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With all horses being DNA'd now, just picking a set of papers out of a stack does not fly. Plus AQHA cannot tell you who a horse is by DNA.
I have been in canner buyers offices as well, and have never seen a big stack of registrations. If I canned a horse, I never sent registration with it. Its just not done.
With all the regs on DNA, the papers must match the horse.
 

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@stevenson, I have seen with my own eyes, MANY loads of canner horses. No skinny ones, no obviously pregnant mares. Its a meat industry, not a bone industry.
Everything I have told you guys is true. You can check it out for yourself.
The plants only buy a certain criteria of horses. And there is a long list of what they won't buy.
Most canner buyers are also horse traders. IF they can get a good horse at a cheap price, they buy it with the intention of resale. If they have plenty of available pasture, they may buy skinny horses with the idea of putting them on pasture for a few months to bring them up to weight.
 

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We were hired once to take a load of what I called canner rejects, to L.A.
These included an old saddle horse with bowed tendons, a couple of just horses, several draft crosses. Most of these, with the exception of the old ranch horse, were not even halter broke.
So we get loaded up and head south. When we were about an hour out, I called the lady and ask her to have some warm water ready for them, and plenty of hay. It was cool where we live, but L.A. was hot.
That's when she did it. She informed me that we were to have had instructions to stop every 30 minutes, and offer feed and water to them! Not wanting to argue with her, I just said again, have water and feed ready as we were coming in.

When we get there, we met this gal in person. Oh boy. Then she introduces us to her "trainer". A little teeny bopper in Daisy Duke cutoffs, barefoot.

They were just filling an old bathtub with the coldest water without having ice cubes in it, that you can imagine.

The horses had gone from being "rescues", to her "dude string" and she was going to rent them out as saddle horses! They were not even halter broke save for that old crippled up saddle horse.

Every one of those horses would have been better off on the truck headed to the plant.
 
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@Dreamcatcher Arabians
it doesnt matter who the buyer is, what matters is what the plants will buy, and what they wont'.
They will NOT buy thin, obviously in foal mares, sick, lame, stallions, weanlings, yearlings, lame horses that cannot walk on all 4 legs.
Canner buyers are horse traders. If they can get a horse cheap enough, most usually do. IF they can get a good horse cheap enough, they will buy that with the notion of resale. If they have access to good pasture, they will buy young horses, mares in foal, thin horses with the idea to fatten them up and then take another look.
Someone comes along that is looking for a horse, they are apt to sell him one, or two, etc.

The bottom line is what the plants will buy, and what they won't.
 
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What I was trying to say is it doesn't happen near as much as it used to. They want to stay in business, and with all the breed associations requiring DNA testing, they can't afford a bunch of angry buyers, no one can.
The old days, and old ways, in many cases, are gone. What used to go on, can't anymore.
 
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