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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi everyone! So I bought a 2004 16.0 hand registered APHA mare a couple of days ago. I have known this horse for about a year and a half and finally was able to buy her from a friend. She was put with a stud in September (5-21). Apparently they were spotted breeding a couple of times. Then after that, she was moved and boarded at a private place. When I got her a couple of days ago, she is underweight....I can see and feel her ribs through her winter hair. What does everyone think. No negative comments...I know september is very late for a horse to be bred. She has not been seen by a vet or checked to see if she is in foal or not. What should I do at this point. The vet will be out in 2-3 months for vaccinations. Here is the link to the stud and the attached picture is my mare.
 

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I would call a vet out sooner as opposed to wait for him to come out for vaccinations. I'm pretty sure they'd know now whether or not she was in foal. Besides, wouldn't you rather know now so you can get her on whatever pregnant mares need as opposed to waiting the extra time?

Edit: I don't see a link to a stud. Maybe I'm blind :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Well right now she is getting grained twice a day and is being cared for as if she is in foal, minus the mare and foal feed. When are you able to see/feel movements. My mini mare foaled at our house 2 years ago this spring and she was bred when we got her, but I can't remember when I could start seeing/feeling movement.
 

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I started being able to feel/see fetal movement in my mare at about 6.5 - 7 months. I'm sure there's variance to that, some earlier, some later. Also, what do you mean you are feeding her as if she was in foal? From what I've read and understood from my vet is that you don't need to start feeding any extra until the last 3 months when the fetus is really growing. If she's underweight though, I'm sure the extra isn't going to hurt, I'm just not entirely clear on what you meant by that statement. :)

I would have the vet out sooner rather than later. If she's pregnant, she should be vaccinated for EHV-1 at 5, 7 and 9 months' gestation.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
She isn't getting mare and foal feed but is getting fed neutrena safe choice twice a day with Equipride supplement. So she isn't full on being fed as if she is in foal, but better than the average horse.
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First, ask yourself, "Does it matter if she's not in foal?", if the answer is yes, then ask, "Do I want to re-breed her early if she's not in foal?", if the answer is yes, call the vet out now. If the answer to number 1 is no, then just feed the mare up to a good weight ans wait and see. If the answer to number one is yes, and 2 is no, then wait and see. If it matters if she's in foal and you want to re-breed her in Feb or March if she's not, call the vet now to find out for sure.

If she's underweight, she's probably not up to date on her vaccinations or her deworming, so I'd concentrate on that for now too. She wasn't due for her first Rhino (Pneumabort K) til late Dec, so you could give that now if you want to. Just FYI conventional wisdom says Rhino at 5,7,9 months, but my vet (OK State Vet School) has me give it at 3,5,7 & 9. They're saying earlier is better.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
It does not matter if she is bred or not. She is up to date on her vaccinations until April. She was recently worked also. This mare was boarded at my house last spring for a while and I have trained with her also since one of my close friends owned her. There is a lot of controversy on the rhino vaccine. I would rather not give it. I didn't give it to my last mare that foaled (she was a mini) and her foal is perfectly healthy and almost 2 years old. The foal will be born in august sometime if there is one. I'm just wondering if it would be ok to wait until late march or April for a vet to see her. If she is not in foal I don't plan on re-breeding her
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Here is the stud she was bred with but he looked slot older now. He was put down in late October/November. His name was Skippas Lil Magic. He was 22 and ended up having limes disease. Would that effect the foal or my mare being in foal? He was tested after the breeding because he acted weak. His owner just thought he was like that because he was very underweight. He was rescued and the owner that had him when he was out down was bringing him back to good health but found out he had limes.
 

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Lyme disease won't affect your mare and foal unless the mare was also bitten by an infected tick.

If you don't care whether she's in foal or not and don't believe in giving the Rhino vaccine, then I wouldn't worry about it and I'd wait til the vet makes his rounds.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
If she is in foal I'll be really excited because she is a really nice mare with good bloodlines and disposition. But alright sounds good! I'll post when the vet comes out to let everyone know if she is in foal or not. Is it harder for the mare to get pregnant in later months? (September)?

Lyme disease won't affect your mare and foal unless the mare was also bitten by an infected tick.

If you don't care whether she's in foal or not and don't believe in giving the Rhino vaccine, then I wouldn't worry about it and I'd wait til the vet makes his rounds.
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Now since the stud was 22, malnurished, and had limes disease, do you still think there is a good chance she is in foal?
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I'm not sure if i mentioned that my mare is a maiden mare...this would be her first foal and she is 10 years old this spring.
 

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The fact that the stallion was malnourished and ill would concern me for his fertility more than his age. If he wasn't sterile and he covered her more than once, I'd say there's a fair chance. You won't know for sure until she either starts showing or until you have the vet out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I talked to her previous owner d's apparently while they were together for about 3 weeks they bred quite a bit.
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apparently while they were together for about 3 weeks they bred quite a bit.
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That could actually end up being problematic. Every time he covers the mare, he could be "injecting" something infectious which could cause an infection and inflammation, which in turn cause the follicle not to implant. The more semen he puts in her, the more likely to flush the embryo. Not saying ANY of that happened of course, it's just worst case scenario.

I try to limit my mares to 2 covers during a cycle. I tease and cover if they're accepting. Skip a day, tease and cover if still accepting and then tease until they go out and won't tease anymore. Wait 17 days, preg check. If she is open and comes back in, repeat. With a young mare (4-12 years) I haven't had to go to the 2nd round of teasing and covering. My stallions have all been young too, 4 years-7 years, so in their prime. With an aged stallion, it could take more to get the job done. Typically they don't produce as much ejaculate and sperm as a younger stallion.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
So with an older stud...would covering more time possibly end up more effective? I'm not sure on how many times they bred but they did more than once
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