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It's a really tough time of the year in western NY. The ground is constantly freezing and thawing creating craters in the pastures. My horses stay out all day and come in at night. I have noticed that my 2 reiners are stocking up quite a bit this winter. They are not lame and I am not really riding them right now. My mare, Jazz, gets stocked up in the hind (especially one leg) and my gelding, Gunny (yes he is a gunner) gets stocked up in the front and rear. Nothing scary or dangerous. In the past, at shows, I noticed that Gunny was stocked up every morning. I contributed the stocking up at shows to standing on the hard mats/floors (even though we load their stalls with bedding)

I wrapped Jazz one night (standing wrap) and she was better the next morning. So I started placing their hay all over the pasture so they would have to walk to different locations to eat. This prevents them from standing in one area. In the wild this is how they feed. They never have one big pile of feed in front of them. LOL

How can I keep their legs tight and not stocked up? I read in this article that it's often common with show horses that stand in stalls a lot of their life and don't get turned out. Gunny probably has been in a stall for 90% of his life (he is turning 6 this May and I have the 4th owner that I know of) Jazz probably has been turned out quite a bit more, but has some arthritis in her back legs from stopping, sliding and turning (she may not be put together perfectly) Jazz will be turning 7 years old. Jazz is a Shining Sparks baby.

Alternative Action: Treating Lymphangitis
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They say wrapping just disperses the liquid to another area. Hmmm.

I also am interested in feeding my horses ACV (apple cider vinegar) I wonder if this could work.
 

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Are they still wearing shoes? If they are, maybe their frogs need more ground contact. Or, they have a little thrush going on.

Nancy
 

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Discussion Starter #3
no thrush and feet look good and healthy.

Are they still wearing shoes? If they are, maybe their frogs need more ground contact. Or, they have a little thrush going on.

Nancy
Hi, My mare, Jazz, has to have front shoes on but doesn't have any shoes in the back. My gelding is barefoot. Yeah. I am guessing he hasn't been barefoot since he was a babe. Anyway, no thrush.

What about change in weather? Last week there was a 56 degree day and then it dropped to 20 degrees.

Also, Does salt make a difference. I know with humans we can bloat up with too much salt.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Love your driving pony Greentree

Hi again, I just noticed your profile pic and I love your pony. I have spent a lot of time driving in my life. I studied in England with Cynthia Hayden in the 80s. I have also have a carriage house of vehicles that I can't get rid of b/c they are so beautiful. Oh well. Sorry for the side track.
 

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Thanks! I am addicted to carriages, and cannot seem to get rid of any, either! It took an entire tractor trailer to move the carriages from Texas, and even then, the metal marathons came with us!

We should swap some photos!

Good luck with the reiners...sorry I don't have a solution.

Nancy
 

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I am going to assume it's because the ground isn't ideal for walking on they are probably standing around the majority of the day eat. My horses (Reiners too) get stocked up if they don't move around much, try lunging them lightly or hand walking them for 20 mins.
 

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I would say they just need to move a bit more, at least that's been my experience with horses stocking up. Can you make the hay piles even smaller in the pasture and maybe decrease the stall time? Turn out in an arena a bit before stalling and get them moving around a bit? My two are out all the time and do spend a good bit of time standing/laying around, but they also "self exercise" quite frequently throughout the course of the day.
 

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My gelding stocks up in his hinds if he's stalled for too long. And how long is 'too long' varies. Sometimes, after heavy exercise, even overnight will cause it if I don't wrap his legs. Normally a day and a half or two days is 'too long.' It doesn't bother him, and it goes away with some light exercise and turnout, so I don't worry too much about it except to make sure he gets turned out for a good part of the day, which I believe horses need anyway.

I don't think my horse ever saw a stall until the past two years with me as he was a pasture/field/drylot horse until he was 5, so I don't know how that plays into anything other than not moving = stocking up. I have heard of a couple cases where adding a joint supplement actually fixed a horse's tendency to stock up, and if you suspect arthritis in one of them, it might be worth a try anyway. Otherwise, get them moving or just ignore it until the weather is better, the ground is softer and they're moving about more.
 

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If you are not working them cut right back on their hard feed. You are doing right in making them move around.

I disagree it has anything to do with shoes, I have had horses stabled and never have this problem. Then some horses are prone to it.

Bandaging will help when they are in.

One thing I have learnt on my trips to the US is that stalls are small and rarely have a deep bed. In the UK most stables are at least 12 x12 and bedded deeply although more people are keeping horses on rubber mats.
A large deeply bedded stable encourages a horse to lie down and gives it more room to move around.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thank Foxhunter. My stalls are only 10x12, but they can hang their heads out into the hall for the length of the stall. I will bed them up. I know if I wrap them up it gets better, but it doesn't really fix the problem -- it only disperses the fluid. Okay. thanks for the tips.
 
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