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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My mare has a mystery lameness in her hind end.

Here is what we know so far:

Grade 1 lameness at the trot
Lameness alternates between both back legs- some days one direction is worse, some days the other.
Does not get worse with flexions
X rays on both hinds are clean
No response to arthritis injections with Pentosan or stifle injections
No response to SI injections
No signs of locking stifle
Lameness has slowly progressed- at first she was just not quite right at the canter, now it is more consistent

Her main symptom is difficulty with cantering. She cannot hold her lead and bucks considerably without a rider. No bucks with a rider, but I think that is because she is trying to be good! Plus I don't really canter her.

The vet suggests a nuclear bone scan, but that is out of my budget right now.

I'm wondering if we should test for lymes and maybe do some X rays for kissing spines? I'm hoping that will be cheaper than a nuclear bone scan... The vet did say if it is a permanent injury to the pelvis, it might not be treatable. Maybe pull blood for EPM as well?

Anyone know if lymes or EPM presents like this? If it was EPM it would have to be a chronic case, but she has no muscle loss (maybe just slightly over the topline).
 

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The bucking is an indicator of pain or discomfort. EPM is more neurological. it causes lesions in the horse's brain causing nerve damage and that's why they have the back leg failures. Your mare seems pretty aware of being in pain.

I would followup on what the vet said. You might be wasting your money on the EPM and lyme tests.
 

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The bucking is an indicator of pain or discomfort. EPM is more neurological. it causes lesions in the horse's brain causing nerve damage and that's why they have the back leg failures. Your mare seems pretty aware of being in pain.

I would followup on what the vet said. You might be wasting your money on the EPM and lyme tests.
I believe it's in the spinal cord &/or brain stem.
 

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Sounds like a back issue.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
My vet did recommend getting the Chiropractor out. I think the plan is to try that next, get her in a fitness program (as SI injuries get worse as the horse gets out of shape) and see how things go from there.

I may just wait 6 months to a year and see about doing the nuclear scan. It might not be too expensive if I don't have to do the entire horse...

I'm not sure if she is in pain or if this is more of a mechanical lameness. She does not respond to palpation anywhere, and is more than happy to gallop in the field (even if she looks weird doing it).
 

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My first thought was lyme. Idk how it would respond to injections but otherwise it sounds accurate. Lyme's is really good at making a minor issue big. There is probably something else going on, but a Lyme's test is a good place to start and nowhere near as expensive as the other stuff you're doing.

I don't know where you are but here in New England a lot of people test regularly.
 

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Have you checked her fronts. It's not a fare-fetched as you might think. If a horse is sore in front, it travels to the poll area, then down the neck along the back to the hinds.
 
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