The Horse Forum banner
Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
580 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,
I am new to this forum. My name is Larissa. Anyways. I have lived on a farm all my life and have trained many horses and corrected many problems. I relocated 1/2 way across the country and now I am looking at purchasing a mare I came across on craigslist. She is a 8 year old unregistered Morgan. She is 14.2 hands. Very dark bay. I was told she has had approx. 30 rides. They have sent numerous pictures of her. A couple saddled and being ridden and one a girl is standing on her in. They did tell me she is quiet and very willing to learn. But very green as in she doesn't really understand cues to much of an extent. I plan to treat her as if she isn't broke period. Because I am sure how I train and how they do and our end goals are different. I use the down under horsemanship method. However I don't how the kits to follow it. I know all the ground stuff and so forth. My end goal is to have a quiet horse who is soft in the mouth, moves off my seat and leg well, and is a pleasure to ride. Any and all input would be appreciated. I go to see her tomorrow. :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
513 Posts
Hi,
I am new to this forum. My name is Larissa. Anyways. I have lived on a farm all my life and have trained many horses and corrected many problems. I relocated 1/2 way across the country and now I am looking at purchasing a mare I came across on craigslist. She is a 8 year old unregistered Morgan. She is 14.2 hands. Very dark bay. I was told she has had approx. 30 rides. They have sent numerous pictures of her. A couple saddled and being ridden and one a girl is standing on her in. They did tell me she is quiet and very willing to learn. But very green as in she doesn't really understand cues to much of an extent. I plan to treat her as if she isn't broke period. Because I am sure how I train and how they do and our end goals are different. I use the down under horsemanship method. However I don't how the kits to follow it. I know all the ground stuff and so forth. My end goal is to have a quiet horse who is soft in the mouth, moves off my seat and leg well, and is a pleasure to ride. Any and all input would be appreciated. I go to see her tomorrow. :D
Good luck! I follow the DH method as well and have been very happy with it. I bought my mare when she had '30 days' on her and was 'willing'. I ended up sending her to a local trainer who used DH and am so glad I did. She let me borrow one of her series (the under saddle series) and I was very thorough and helpful. If at all possible I would try to get your hands on some DVDs. Maybe you can find someone close to you that would let you borrow them?
Posted via Mobile Device
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
716 Posts
You seem to be experience enough to handle her ;)

My only advice would be to make sure she is physically and mentally prepared for each new training step.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,052 Posts
I also follow Clinton Anderson Downunder Horsemanship, I have for about 8 yrs. now, I did have all his training DVDs (not his new method ones) but have since sold them just before xmas.
My mare is going to be 12 this year, I've had her since she was 3 with 30 days of riding also, I was new getting back into riding after 30 yrs. and with the help of DUH I have a great riding partner......good luck!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
580 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I went and saw her today. She is beautiful. She is def a mix or some sort. But it is clear she has Morgan in her. I don't mind that she is mixed. She was very interested in me and my family when we arrived. Very brave. Walked straight up to us. She was very relaxed. Had her hind leg resting as I rubbed all over her and put pressure on her back and where a girth would set. I didn't have her saddled or anything. The only problem I found was that she def has had way to many treats from the hand. She would "lip" your hands and pockets searching for them. She wont be coming home until March. We are working on the fence and barn once this -11 to 20 degree weather breaks. So I can't do anything about the treat issue except not give her treats myself until she is here. Then I can really nip it in the butt. What a lovely mare she is outside of that. So so brave. I want to say she has some form of draft in her though. Her neck is so thick along with her body. She is seriously built like a war tank.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
420 Posts
Sounds like a nice horse. Maybe just me, but I have never minded having a horse come to me looking for treats. I always try to take something for them when I call them to me. They learn their limits as long as you are consistent in your rules.

I like Clinton Anderson's methodology, but I find that to get it right takes a lot of practice. Hard to teach the horse to react precisely when my commands are not entirely precise.

About that thick neck, a thick, high crest on a horse can be symptomatic of a predisposition to chronic laminitis. You might do well to have the horse checked by a vet before laying down the money. On the other hand, Morgans are known for a strong neck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
962 Posts
Long rides, wet saddle blankets and concentrated training! Just travel out on her. Go forward for awhile, then take her in left and right circles walking. What Clinton calls "bend at the walk". Simple things like walking in left and right circles will get you far down the road and aren't complicated for the horse. One-rein stops as necessary, but once they're working good leave them alone unless and until you need them. Lots of fast walk to slow trot to fast trot, mixing traveling straight with those simple circles. Do some transitions to the canter but much more trotting. Post the trot. Passenger lesson at the trot and follow the fence if you're in an arena.

You're just building that horse's experience at being ridden foward, backward left and right. But get that lateral forward work at the walk perfect! That's going to be the biggest muscle-memory builder so that she learns how to be guided later at speed!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
580 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Sounds like a nice horse. Maybe just me, but I have never minded having a horse come to me looking for treats. I always try to take something for them when I call them to me. They learn their limits as long as you are consistent in your rules.

I like Clinton Anderson's methodology, but I find that to get it right takes a lot of practice. Hard to teach the horse to react precisely when my commands are not entirely precise.

About that thick neck, a thick, high crest on a horse can be symptomatic of a predisposition to chronic laminitis. You might do well to have the horse checked by a vet before laying down the money. On the other hand, Morgans are known for a strong neck.
What bothered me about her looking for treats was she was demanding about it and pushing her head all over me trying to get them. Which is disrespectful in my opinion. She has been seem by a vet. There isn't anything wrong with her. It is just her build. I like how thick and strong her neck is :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17,077 Posts
Less is more with an inexperienced horse. Make sure she has solid whoa, walk, trot, and canter. Make sure she moves away from pressure.

When you are on her, the first thing you teach is to move away from leg and practice stopping and standing from time to time. Stay out of her mouth and be sensitive (but effective) with your legs and seat. Less is more.. you can always build on it later.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top