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Discussion Starter #22
Can you post a video of him being lunged? Especially at the canter.
He sounds like slipping stifles, and if your vet thought stifles it is even more likely.

Injections don't necessarily work because it is not an inside the joint problem.
My TB was rehomed a few times because of similar. A big clue is dragging the hind hooves.

At first they seem fine, but as you work them more the ligaments rub more over the bone and get more inflamed. Soon exercise is painful. My horse kicked out and bucked a lot. Circles are difficult and poles as well if there is inflammation.

Other signs are reluctance to go downhill, problems in deep or loose footing, and getting "stuck" when asked to move forward. They tend to crossfire at the canter.

If this is the case, more helpful than the joint injections was putting my horse on Equioxx to help the inflammation. You could do a trial of bute for a couple of days, then ride to see if anything changes.
 

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Wait to see what others say because I don't have that good of an eye...

What I do see is an irritated horse. If you watch in slow motion and look carefully, you can see that he is short-striding. His fronts aren't extending - to the point of landing toe first. There is little reach of the hind end.

I don't know for sure what is causing his kicking. Just what I see, though.
 

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That horse is sore on front and backend. He's agitated tail swishing kicking up. Not a happy horse he's in pain.
 

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Yes, I definitely see a horse having physical problems. That is not an attitude issue. It could be locking or slipping stifles, but could also be another physical issue. I think you need a good lameness vet for diagnosis.
 

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Discussion Starter #27 (Edited)
Yes, I definitely see a horse having physical problems. That is not an attitude issue. It could be locking or slipping stifles, but could also be another physical issue. I think you need a good lameness vet for diagnosis.
Yes, that’s what the vet thinks as well. He just put him on an anti inflammatory medication yesterday.
The strange thing is he only started doing this when he’s ridden. I’ll post another video of him yesterday being lunged, very different.
 

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Discussion Starter #29
Lastly this was a couple days ago being ridden, we aren’t allowing him to kick out but he wants to.
The vet said he should continue to be worked lightly so his joints build muscle.
He just doesn’t look lame here .
that’s why we thought it may be attitude or something else
IMG_3342.MOV
 

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Carrying weight is harder, so that's probably why it showed up under saddle. There is a lot of information online about locking or slipping stifles, if you haven't read about it.

They will not appear lame unless the leg locks up completely. But there are subtle signs such as the toe dragging in the trotting video. Also the hind end does not look strong and the transitions awkward at times.

Horses learn that if they feel the ligament catching, they can move the hind leg a certain way with a hop, buck or kick to unlock it. I would not punish the kick but see it as a sign the leg is not working properly.

As the vet said, if you strengthen the muscle above the knee (quadriceps), it can shorten the muscle enough that the tendon becomes tighter and does not catch.

But if you overdo the exercise, the horse will get too sore and avoid using the muscle as much. My horse was unable to build the muscles no matter how much I worked him, until I put him on the anti-inflammatory.

To avoid overwork don't overdo circles, hills or poles. Also avoid deep footing. Straight lines at walk and trot are good. Also, many horses have had the issue resolve by going on 24/7 turnout. Stalling a horse can make the issue appear or get worse.
 

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Discussion Starter #32
Carrying weight is harder, so that's probably why it showed up under saddle. There is a lot of information online about locking or slipping stifles, if you haven't read about it.

They will not appear lame unless the leg locks up completely. But there are subtle signs such as the toe dragging in the trotting video. Also the hind end does not look strong and the transitions awkward at times.

Horses learn that if they feel the ligament catching, they can move the hind leg a certain way with a hop, buck or kick to unlock it. I would not punish the kick but see it as a sign the leg is not working properly.

As the vet said, if you strengthen the muscle above the knee (quadriceps), it can shorten the muscle enough that the tendon becomes tighter and does not catch.

But if you overdo the exercise, the horse will get too sore and avoid using the muscle as much. My horse was unable to build the muscles no matter how much I worked him, until I put him on the anti-inflammatory.

To avoid overwork don't overdo circles, hills or poles. Also avoid deep footing. Straight lines at walk and trot are good. Also, many horses have had the issue resolve by going on 24/7 turnout. Stalling a horse can make the issue appear or get worse.
Thank you for this advice, very useful.
The vet gave me previcox to start him on yesterday. I wish he could get 24/7 turn out.
How long did it take your horse to recover ?
I
 

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I think your horse will do much better than mine. It looks like he moves better, has better conformation and he's younger. My horse's issue wasn't caught until he was ten because people just passed him on for behavioral issues and didn't spot the problem. So it took months of trying things and then getting his body to readjust. He still has minor issues in deep footing but can go on long rides and such.
I've heard if it is recognized earlier and younger it can be fairly simple to get the horse strengthened enough that they don't have any issues. Even a matter of several weeks. But be aware it could show up again in the future if he had to go on stall rest after an injury, etc. That's because it relates to the hind leg conformation (too straight).
 

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Discussion Starter #34
I think your horse will do much better than mine. It looks like he moves better, has better conformation and he's younger. My horse's issue wasn't caught until he was ten because people just passed him on for behavioral issues and didn't spot the problem. So it took months of trying things and then getting his body to readjust. He still has minor issues in deep footing but can go on long rides and such.
I've heard if it is recognized earlier and younger it can be fairly simple to get the horse strengthened enough that they don't have any issues. Even a matter of several weeks. But be aware it could show up again in the future if he had to go on stall rest after an injury, etc. That's because it relates to the hind leg conformation (too straight).
 

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Discussion Starter #35
Thant is positive, I am a new horse owner and have only had him a couple months so it’s been stressful trying to figure out what to do.
My vet is good but not very informative so he basically said do lots of hill work and that was it.
The biggest issue is the change in his personality he was very relaxed I could even ride him in a halter but now he’s nervous and spooky,
I’m hoping the new anti inflammatory medication the vet gave me helps him calm down and focus.
 
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My TB is 7. I bought him in October, he was absolutely perfectly behaved till December when he started acting out. When I ask him to trot or move forward he kicks up a hind leg moving it towards his stomach. He will do this with either leg. Ears pinned and clearly not wanting to work.
So far we’ve treated him for Ulcers and my vet said he thought he looked stifled from a video I showed him so he did injections on 12/28. I’ve been working him over poles daily to get strength in his hind area. He doesn’t look lame though! It can easily look like attitude. No limping at all and only kicks his back leg up when I use my own leg on him.
I had a friend Riding him 2 days a week and she used tiny English spurs so I thought he may have become spur sour as he wasn’t use to them.
his temperament is the biggest issue I’m having. He was an angel in the ring and on trail, very chill, now he’s irritable and spooky, unwilling to work.
I’m having the vet come back tomorrow but would love advice.
My horse has a funny way of showing when he's in pain or when someone hurts him or when he's got hurt he pulled his attitude where he bucks at me bites at me and he could be in pain because he's bucking while you're writing him he probably not showing anything but he's trying to tell you hey get off my back you're hurting me so you might want to have a chiropractor look at his backThey can tell you so much more than of that can tell you You want to get a horse chiropractor ☺
 

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My TB is 7. I bought him in October, he was absolutely perfectly behaved till December when he started acting out. When I ask him to trot or move forward he kicks up a hind leg moving it towards his stomach. He will do this with either leg. Ears pinned and clearly not wanting to work.
So far we’ve treated him for Ulcers and my vet said he thought he looked stifled from a video I showed him so he did injections on 12/28. I’ve been working him over poles daily to get strength in his hind area. He doesn’t look lame though! It can easily look like attitude. No limping at all and only kicks his back leg up when I use my own leg on him.
I had a friend Riding him 2 days a week and she used tiny English spurs so I thought he may have become spur sour as he wasn’t use to them.
his temperament is the biggest issue I’m having. He was an angel in the ring and on trail, very chill, now he’s irritable and spooky, unwilling to work.
I’m having the vet come back tomorrow but would love advice.
My mare also showed issues and it was stifles. Did the Prevocox treatment, looked at other options and decided to just let her hocks fuse. They have fused now and other than not able to pick her hind feet very high, she has healed. We don't jump or run barrels, just trails and a little arena if no time for trail. We also discontinued alfalfa, too much protein. Since you free feed teff, the alfalfa may be overkill.
 

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My mare also showed issues and it was stifles. Did the Prevocox treatment, looked at other options and decided to just let her hocks fuse. They have fused now and other than not able to pick her hind feet very high, she has healed. We don't jump or run barrels, just trails and a little arena if no time for trail. We also discontinued alfalfa, too much protein. Since you free feed teff, the alfalfa may be overkill.
Just to clarify, locking or slipping stifles don't fuse (it is a ligament that gets caught, not an arthritic joint) so the hocks fusing are a separate issue. A horse can have stifle and hock issues separately.
If a horse moves poorly from the stifle catching, it can lead to arthritis down the road.

With slipping or locking stifles it is a goal to build muscle, so adding protein or amino acids would be more helpful than limiting it.
 

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Definitely looks pain-related, something is going on there. Maybe get an osteopath to come out and see, or see what your vet says.
Hopefully he feels better, I wouldn't personally ride him until he improves. Maybe groundwork, but definitely looks like a pain issue/discomfort, not an attitude problem. Hopefully the medicine helps & the strengthening exercises.
 

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Discussion Starter #40
My mare also showed issues and it was stifles. Did the Prevocox treatment, looked at other options and decided to just let her hocks fuse. They have fused now and other than not able to pick her hind feet very high, she has healed. We don't jump or run barrels, just trails and a little arena if no time for trail. We also discontinued alfalfa, too much protein. Since you free feed teff, the alfalfa may be overkill.
 
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