The Horse Forum banner

Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Looking for a bit recommendation. My daughter is 14 and has been showing her horse in 4h events, she started out with the rail events and is now starting the barrels and poles. Her mare was originally trained for western pleasure and does not like heavy hands on the bit. She works well in a d-ring twisted dog bone snaffle but my daughter needs something with a little more stop and some lift on the turns. I'm trying to stay away from shank bits as this mare is trained to be on loose rein and neck rein with a shanked bit. I found this brittney pozzi combination bit that looks like a possibility but the mouthpiece is 5.5" and I need 5". Any recommendations?

https://profchoice.com/i-7581608-brittany-pozzi-combination-series-three-piece-twisted-wire.html
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
186 Posts
First of all, you will need bits don't really help. What is the problem? Bitting up should be a last resort. Instead try proper training and see if that helps. Again, bitting up should be a last resort.

Second of all, is the mare light or heavy mouthed? It will help with results. Also, in my opinion, the bit in current use is a good "barrel" bit. Finding a bit without shanks is gonna be hard aswell, especially a bit with leverage. As if heard (and learned) it is best to stay away from Brittany Pozzi bits.

Again, Some more info would be helpful!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,717 Posts
Looking for a bit recommendation. My daughter is 14 and has been showing her horse in 4h events, she started out with the rail events and is now starting the barrels and poles. Her mare was originally trained for western pleasure and does not like heavy hands on the bit.

First of all, welcome to the forums!



How old is the mare? You say she was originally trained for WP but what training or experience has she had on barrels/poles?
What experience does your daughter have?



She works well in a d-ring twisted dog bone snaffle but my daughter needs something with a little more stop and some lift on the turns. I'm trying to stay away from shank bits as this mare is trained to be on loose rein and neck rein with a shanked bit. I found this brittney pozzi combination bit that looks like a possibility but the mouthpiece is 5.5" and I need 5". Any recommendations?

While bit selection is important, control on the barrel pattern comes down to TRAINING. You train the horse to listen and keep good body position. The bit is only your communication to the horse for that training.



I'm a bit confused because you say you want to stay away from shanked bits, yet the Pozzi bit you posted is a shanked bit. (shanks don't have to mean a straight shanked bit -- leverage can come from any type of curb bit) Because the mouthpiece can rotate on the bit you posted, you now have leverage. And actually a fair amount of gag action with this bit.



I myself do not like combination bits. I feel that they are too confusing (so many cues going on) and I feel that proper training can eliminate the need most of the time.


What exact problems is your daughter having with her mare?
What are you trying to achieve and/or fix?


I like to do many different events with my horses as well. I feel the more well-rounded they are, the more it helps with their barrel racing. Just because you use a shanked bit in WP with this mare, doesn't mean you can't use one for barrels *if* that is going to work the best for your situation.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
127 Posts
Bits do not create "lift". They lift the head, and that may imitate truly raising the base of the neck and the forehand to a rider who doesn't know any better(or hasn't felt the difference in a correctly trained horse), but by raising only the head they push down the base of the neck and negate any actual lift. It's like the reiners that sit back in their seats and pull their horse's head up, instead of actually teaching the horse the self carriage to stop properly. I don't like combination bits either, as no matter how much companies spout about how it "disperses pressure" or how the noseband engages first, the noseband nearly always engages last - not the mention a lot of the mouthpieces are very crappy, and the cues so mixed due the gag action and noseband combined that all you tend to get is a frustrated, confused, and frightened horse. Quicker response time does not mean the horse is responsive.

Training is the only answer to get an actual result and not just a band-aid. Get a decent barrel trainer - if they say anything about "getting a headset" ditch them. Headset and lift come from correct body work and training, not training aids. I've run plenty of horses in just about everything - halters, snaffles, curbs, hacks - you name it. The bit(or halter/hack) that the horse is most comfortable with, paired with correct training, is always the best.

That said, why exactly don't you want a curb? Jointed mouthpiece =/= snaffle, and that combination bit is definitely a curb. Barrel racing in most levels is a direct-rein sport, so you're liking going to want a three-piece mouthpiece or swivel shanks on that curb. Or you could just run in a snaffle, as that works just fine with the right training.
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top