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Hi everyone!
I own a Welsh cob 13.2hh and so far I haven't had to feed him anything besides grass (and a salt lick) as he
came to me extremely over weight.
I have finally brought his weight down and its now turning into winter over here (Aus)
Just wondering if its okay to buy a bale and feed him twice daily in a feeding bucket seperate from the other horse
in his paddock? The horse he shares a paddock with is very dominant..
A lot of people mention just letting the horses access the hay 24/7 by 'dumping' it in the paddock, however
I would prefer to waste less of it and feed it separately.
Thanks in advance!
 

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You can feed hay/forage . I would not grain him. Start giving him smaller amounts while there is still some grass. If he is in with another horse, what is that horse eating in winter ? If the other horse is being thrown hay he will probably try for that hay also . You should gradually change feed types. I do not know what type of hay you feed , its quality etc. It would probably help you more to speak someone in your area about the feed types available to you
 

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You might also consider using a haynet. It is less wasteful, and also prevents the horse from eating it too fast. I would think it would be messy to feed hay out of a bucket (mine would just pull it all out and throw it all over the place).

As far as nutritional value, if you can get hay that is as similar as possible to the grass he's getting, it would be pretty safe. Look for hay that is not dusty or moldy (no black, and if you hit it, there shouldn't be any dust flying off it), and does not have undesirable weeds.
 

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Hi, how much grass is there in his paddock? Regardless of how fat or otherwise a horse is, they still need to eat forage, little & often, at least about 2% bwt daily. Which is somewhere around 7kg/day feed, if he's around 350kg weight. So depending on how much grass, he will need a lot more than a couple of buckets daily, and will also not do well if he's hungry for long periods between those meals. So I second the idea of a hay net. And if the other horse isn't likely to share nicely, make sure there are a couple in the paddock, well separated.

As for what kind of hay, I would definitely avoid anything with clover or lucerne, and would avoid rye grass too. These are often advertised as 'good horse hay' but are extremely rich for horses, and especially could be problematic with one who was obese, so likely insulin resistant too. I'd go native grass if possible, or otherwise low sugar(Teff is starting to come on the scene as a healthy horse hay in Oz).
 

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Because your horse is overweight does not mean you barely feed him....that's wrong!
You need to monitor and control his calorie intake yes, but he does need to eat.
You need to figure out how much he "needs" he "requires" daily to maintain his weight then cut back some, not all or a huge amount either...but some.
Since you have so limited his intake of nutrition have you offered on a daily basis vitamins and minerals in proper amounts he is now not getting from the loss of the forage he had been getting?
It takes time to have a horse become obese...
It also takes time to have a horse slim down safely...

It is no different for a horse than a human, a dog or cat or any other living animal.
The body requires certain amounts and kinds of food ingested daily or it tends to not be healthy...
Please be very careful that your intention is good of a horse in better weight not upset the delicate balance of to fast a loss of weight and harm the organs, the bones, the tendons...the health of the horse trying to do the right thing...
I hope you consulted with a equine nutritionist {feed manufacturers have them on staff to answer questions for free} or your vet if you indeed "crash dieted" this animal first.

Best of luck.
:runninghorse2:....

 

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^Very valid points, but I got the idea his weight is already reduced enough, that she is wondering how to feed to maintain it now...

You're right.... :wink:
Thanks....
Much still applies...

So, not sure how easy a keeper cobs are normally.
You need to weigh the horse or guesstimate pretty accurately to allow the horse enough hay for his daily maintaining of his "now" weight.
I would suggest purchasing a weight tape as many underestimate their horses weight and then you will be shorting his food amounts needed.
Rule of thumb is 1 - 2% of their weight in hay fed...
Remember that you must take into consideration the work amount & kind the horse does daily, the weather conditions and shelter available, if blanketing the horse. All will have consideration when you figure those amounts of hay fed.
Feeding from slow feed hay-nets slows the amount the horse can gobble quickly, allowing the horse to have their daily allotment over a longer period of time which is best for the horses digestion.
Making slow-feed feeders of any sort that are horse friendly and safe for them is a great idea too...
Make sure the horse is able to eat their ration of hay with no one else stealing it...
:runninghorse2:....
jmo...
 

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Discussion Starter #8
^Very valid points, but I got the idea his weight is already reduced enough, that she is wondering how to feed to maintain it now...
Yes thank you ^^

I had him in a 4 acre paddock with (lots) of grass during summer, also his weight didn't decrease rapidly, he is still considered
'chunky' I am not starving my animal.. I rode him for very light trail rides until his fitness increased, cobs hold their weight well. I am now starting to ride longer and harder, also doing some jumping here and there.

Currently feeding him some hard feed and hay twice per day 4-5kg at a time. I spread it in roughly 3 piles as the other horse does nibble and scare off my pony.
His owner will come eventually however, and remove him from the paddock around the same time to feed him so my pony will end up with the majority of the hay.

I guess I should've put more info in but I seriously didn't think I would get backlash about me wanting to know more.
 

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I guess I should've put more info in but I seriously didn't think I would get backlash about me wanting to know more.
If that is "aimed" at me it was not meant as a attack as you're thinking.
It is the way I write...not sugar-coating words or phrases...

It is good to ask questions when not sure....
It is how you learn and grow in knowledge of all things in this world.
Don't not ask questions or read and learn...do though filter what you read on the internet as not everything read is fact, truthful or accurate.
There are many ways of doing things too and not every way will be right nor comfortable for your particular situation...

I too have reached out here for help and not given enough facts and gotten called on it and or comments made that I was like "what did I do" wrong?
And I too have made errors in how I read something just like others have done, thankfully others caught that and a correction was also made when made aware of the goof...

Glad your pony is doing better.
Enjoy the time spent together.

:runninghorse2:....
 

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There was no 'backlash' OP, or, I'm guessing, did HLG even assume you were 'starving' your horse. He was just pointing out why that's not a good idea - because unfortunately, many people DO think that to get a horse to lose weight you put them in a 'Jenny Craig' yard & barely feed them anything. Or feed them in infrequent meals, where they might eat solidly for an hour or so & then go hungry in between.

I'm curious, especially if he is still 'chunky', what is the 'hard feed' he's getting & why? I'd definitely consider feeding him a nutritional supp, but certainly not 'hard feed' in the way it's commonly meant.

So I'm guessing now he's still in the same paddock & there is nothing left of the grass? Then unless he's little, he will likely need a bit more than 5kg hay a day. And as mentioned again, they shouldn't be left hungry in between 'meals' either. With a small holed hay net(you can buy it by the m from the manufacturer, Haverfords, WAY cheaper than as 'hay net' from a saddlery or such), a round bale lasts for nearly 4 weeks for my 3 horses.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I'm curious, especially if he is still 'chunky', what is the 'hard feed' he's getting & why? I'd definitely consider feeding him a nutritional supp, but certainly not 'hard feed' in the way it's commonly meant.

So I'm guessing now he's still in the same paddock & there is nothing left of the grass? Then unless he's little, he will likely need a bit more than 5kg hay a day. And as mentioned again, they shouldn't be left hungry in between 'meals' either. With a small holed hay net(you can buy it by the m from the manufacturer, Haverfords, WAY cheaper than as 'hay net' from a saddlery or such), a round bale lasts for nearly 4 weeks for my 3 horses.
He's on hygain zero, a fibre based feed. Just pellets. 5 kg twice a day of hay and still plenty of grass in the paddock. Its now winter here though so the nutritional value of the grass isn't enough.
 

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Yeah, I'm in Yarra Valley, so know the season, know the feed! ;-) So I assume he's getting the Zero in an attempt to provide nutrition? The more I have learned about nutrition, I've come to believe horses generally need nutritional supps throughout the year, not just over winter. Nutrition is one of those huge & convoluted subjects!

I use Zero myself, as a 'low cal' treat, and also as a carrier for nutritional supps. Unfortunately, it's not a 'ration balancer' and won't give him an awful lot of what he needs. If you want to go for Hygain, their 'Balanced' isn't a bad product. I too have fatties & I chose not to feed this though, because of the quantity, so calories needed to be fed of it. Mine are on solely bush grass ATM, and they're supped with KER Gold and extra magnesium. I highly recommend looking into supping extra Mg, for a number of reasons, not least that he's likely insulin resistant if he was/is obese.
 

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Yeah, I'm in Yarra Valley, so know the season, know the feed! ;-) So I assume he's getting the Zero in an attempt to provide nutrition? The more I have learned about nutrition, I've come to believe horses generally need nutritional supps throughout the year, not just over winter. Nutrition is one of those huge & convoluted subjects!

I use Zero myself, as a 'low cal' treat, and also as a carrier for nutritional supps. Unfortunately, it's not a 'ration balancer' and won't give him an awful lot of what he needs. If you want to go for Hygain, their 'Balanced' isn't a bad product. I too have fatties & I chose not to feed this though, because of the quantity, so calories needed to be fed of it. Mine are on solely bush grass ATM, and they're supped with KER Gold and extra magnesium. I highly recommend looking into supping extra Mg, for a number of reasons, not least that he's likely insulin resistant if he was/is obese.
I'm Yarra Valley too!

I think I'll be feeding him similar to this forever from now on but I was actually looking into the hygain balanced too instead :biggrin: He is looking super fit and healthy at the moment so I will see how we go! Thanks for the advice, tbh when I bought him I was super worried about him foundering from his weight :eek_color::|
I do have a salt lick in the paddock but I was thinking about getting the one that contained mg and all those extra supps they need, it does have molasses to improve the flavour :smile:
 

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Yeah, it's been shown that horses get little from a 'lick'. Therefore, while mine generally have a straight salt(Himalayan) lump in their paddock, they also get salt & Mg in their feed too. Their 'feed' being about 1kg max between 3 of them - just enough to mix supps with & be palatable for the fusspots!
 
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