The Horse Forum banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I bought this saddle from a man on Craigslist and have not been able to figure out the brand. He told me he didn’t know the maker but he did know it was made in England. The only mark of identification I’ve been able to find is the tiny engraving mark on the stirrup bar, it looks like some kind of crescent moon shape and fish maybe? LOL. It also has red and blue stripes at the top of the girth straps and the D rings are larger than most saddles I’ve rode in.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,224 Posts
Probably doesn't have a brand name. And is he sure it was made in England? Did he have a receipt of some kind to prove it? Not to be stingy, but I've had people tell me things were made or "custom made" places when it was clearly a mass-produced item. People say things.

But if it fits the horse and is in good shape, it works. I actually just sold one that looks similar to that, but brown. Same color billets too. It didn't have a brand name.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,679 Posts
Just from the pictures, the leather looks Asian. But I am not there in person to actually feel it so I could be wrong.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
14,771 Posts
No idea of brand if it is identifiable as made by someone specific...
Most "Made in England" saddles sport buttons seen that say that on them.
If this was a name brand saddle it would be leather stamped, have a riveted on plate under the short saddle skirt would be my place to look.
The fact I'm not seeing billet guards makes me think more this is not a real quality saddle as billet guards are pretty standard items included with quality saddles today.
Billet guards are the life of your saddle under-flap or you will ruin the flap and wears holes through in time with riding.
Buy a replacement set ASAP, easy to install and use them to cover the buckles from wearing holes...
Even saddles that are not highest quality may have billet guards with company logo on them and those missing makes me think lower quality of saddle you bought..
Buyer beware...but as long as it fits your horse, you and your needs...enjoy the purchase and just keep a eye that the saddle innards are safe for your horse to be wearing when you ride.
:runninghorse2:...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Most "Made in England" saddles sport buttons seen that say that on them.
If this was a name brand saddle it would be leather stamped, have a riveted on plate under the short saddle skirt would be my place to look.
The fact I'm not seeing billet guards makes me think more this is not a real quality saddle as billet guards are pretty standard items included with quality saddles today.
Billet guards are the life of your saddle under-flap or you will ruin the flap and wears holes through in time with riding.
Buy a replacement set ASAP, easy to install and use them to cover the buckles from wearing holes...
Even saddles that are not highest quality may have billet guards with company logo on them and those missing makes me think lower quality of saddle you bought..
Buyer beware...but as long as it fits your horse, you and your needs...enjoy the purchase and just keep a eye that the saddle innards are safe for your horse to be wearing when you ride.

It has billet guards, I was in the middle of cleaning the saddle when I took those pictures so I had them off to clean. Thank you for the tip though!
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
14,771 Posts
It has billet guards, I was in the middle of cleaning the saddle when I took those pictures so I had them off to clean. Thank you for the tip though!

In that case look very carefully at those guards...
They indeed might have a makers mark, lettering that was painted on the leather guard that could identify the manufacturer...now faded but held to the right light source you might see it.

I honestly don't know of any quality saddles made by a named company that don't mark their saddles in at least one place, or several.
Billet guards and a saddle plate attached under that saddle skirt would absolutely be the places to start looking...
Otherwise, I don't see any identifiers on this saddle, sorry...
:runninghorse2:...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,119 Posts
Honestly, this saddle looks like and reminds me of an old Regent saddle I bought many years ago. I was new to English and thought I was getting a steal of a deal paying $150 for a used saddle. What I got was an absolute crap Asian made saddle that has only fit one horse. Leather never got soft no matter what I did and had that crackly look to it that yours seems to have in some spots. Also, the flocking on yours does not seem relatively even and seems almost creased in some spots, which is not 100% an identifier but worth looking into as Asian made saddles tend to be flocked with trash lint scraps rather than wool or foam.

Sorry, I wish I could be of more help but all of the higher quality saddles I have come into contact with have had makers marks on multiple places on the saddle (the flaps, buttons, metal plates, etc) this saddle is not showing anything leading to believe it is a quality "Made in England" saddle. =(

I do, however, hope it works well for you!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,334 Posts
This saddle screams "Made in India" to me. Definitely not England. Sorry :(

It's the look of the leather, the shape of the tree, the apparent consistency of the flocking in the panels, and the lack of obvious maker's mark. That and English made saddles usually have "Made in England" stamped somewhere obvious, and/or "Genuine English Leather".

Years ago I was sold a saddle that was "made in Germany". Seller was not aware it wasn't, but it was actually made in Argentina by a company called Ruiz Diaz. It was a lovely saddle, and had I done my research before buying I still would have bought it, but Argentina definitely isn't Germany. It's possible that something similar happened here. It's also possible that the gentleman who sold it to you knew full well that it was made in India and also knew that he was unlikely to ever sell it if he was honest about that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,395 Posts
Definitely Asian. The rivetted stirrup bars are a giveaway, as are the large, plain head nails (often plated), and flap leather quality. Composite billets are pretty common, too, though other manufacturers use them so that's not always a definitive guide.

I'm afraid these are usually poor quality in both tree and leatherwork, and the flocking can be carpet waste rather than proper wool. Sorry to say this, and I hope you didn't pay much for it, but I wouldn't put one on any horse I owned, though I know a few people who've used one and had no trouble. I guess it's pot luck.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top