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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So first off I am feel like a pretty crappy owner right now and very frustrated with my trainer and highly thinking of moving.

Here is why I am so frustrated,
Since in my trainers care I have had to fallow her to two barns in the past 6 months. This new barn seemed to be great but i can tell Ollie is not happy here, suddenly pulling back in the cross ties, pawing, shaking his head with a very worried eye...a lot!

As of last week he got trimmed, he is barefoot, never had a lame or sore step and has tough feet so doesn't need shoes...well this trim suddenly he is so sore he can't walk and seems to be on his left side more then the right.

Got a call from my trainer today informing me she's "just gonna slap some shoes on" to get him un sore, didn't ask me and said infect she would have already had it done but couldn't get the farrier out this week....I was In shock and very upset she didnt think of asking me first, my horse not her's.

In this phone call I was told he was still sore yesterday when he was being worked and she continued to work him... All the hors who got trimmed are now lame and she is slapping shoes on, seems like something the farrier is doing, not just like 4 solid barefoot horses to go dead lame limping out if the blue... So very upset with that.

Past things are just as upsetting and I feel like I should be able to trust my trainer...and every month something bad seems to happen. He got pneumonia this winter and almost got it a second time, she and I worked well together to get him back to health and it's been a slow recovery but she is pushing him more and more and not addressing the issues of him being naughty. Yes he now has more turnout and is basically 100% healthy but I'm just not feeling comfertable with how things are going.

The person, now close friend who bought Klassy from my, now named Kasmere :) is helping me make plans to move him next month (April) to her barn where its around the clock care with video monitoring, pasture turnout all day with gelding and mare pastures, hay is weighed and there is a vet who boards, they BO and her sister live on site about 70ft away from the barn! They have many horses there needing special care and you wouldn't even guess some of there issues cause they look so happy and healthy cause it's top notch care that is individualized to each horse. I talked to the barn owner today and explained oliver's respiratory issues and immune issues from the pneumonia and she has a good idea to help him with many of his issues of being sensitive boy, stall walker, breathing issues and compromised immune system..and now him being very sore on his feet. I'm starting to wonder how I have any hair left I'm so stressed out!
I will be talking to my trainer tomorrow and giving her notice of me taking him and leaving. I feel bad to be leaving cause I know she means well and is just very young but there is to much negative things going on, and since it's a new barn she is taking on she doesn't know how much it's al going to cost right away and I can't move him again with her with his issues, I'm not excited for lessons anymore, not at all excited for show season...there will no show season cause he is not ready after all of this crap.

What do you think. Please don't be to harsh I'm trying to do what is best for my horse, I k ow he is trying to tell me something is really bothering him and I'm trying my best to stop and listen...

So frustrated and upset right now:cry:
Been crying cause I feel like I'm failing my horse
 

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Your not failing your horse. But you can fail as a owner if not getting him away from the trainer ASAP. You have to find a trainer with huge references because I tell you what. Some don't know digglty ****. All talk. That's all he will be happy. Just give him love. He is telling you he wants out. He may get beat or something. Your his leader and he is trying to tell you
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I know I can't move him till April maybe a little sooner. My trainer knows alot just isn't the trainer for us come to find out, she means well but is young, doing way to much and it's compermising alot around her. I'm not defending her but know she is trying to get it all to work. I'm going to stop lessons and training so am the only one working with him so there isn't more I have to undo once he is moved.
 

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Have you gone to your trainer and demanded that the shoes she had put on your horse without your permission be removed at her cost?

I would.


Have you paid for the horseshoes yet?

I would not.


Why can't you move your horse now, or whenever your 30 day notice is up? Is there no room at the new barn? If there are no stalls, have you asked for your horse to be put on pasture board at the new barn until a stall comes open just so you can get him out of where he currently is?

You need to stop feeling "bad" for people who don't respect you as an owner.
 

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First, I'd tell her no shoes, period and put him on stall rest or pasture if available until he's not sore anymore.

2nd, I'd tell her she's not to train or work him anymore.

3rd, That farrier is not to come near him again, unless it's to pull the shoes off if you couldn't stop that in time.

4th, if the new barn has space, I'd pull him out right now, no 30 day notice and I'd dare her to take me to court on it.

5th, do it all yesterday! :)

You're not failing him, you're just not understanding how stupid some trainers can be. Doesn't matter if she's young, bitten off more than she can chew, is scrambling to make it work, etc etc. Not your problem. The fact that your horse is starting to have problems under her care IS your problem and one you'll be correcting for a while.

I'm a she-devil when it comes to my horses, and trainers and barn help know that going in. I rarely have problems and if I do, I pull the horse right now and I tell the trainer exactly WHY I have pulled the horse, right after the trailer is on it's way down the road. If she's young, hopefully she'll learn.
 

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As of last week he got trimmed, he is barefoot, never had a lame or sore step and has tough feet so doesn't need shoes...well this trim suddenly he is so sore he can't walk and seems to be on his left side more then the right.

In this phone call I was told he was still sore yesterday when he was being worked and she continued to work him... All the hors who got trimmed are now lame and she is slapping shoes on, seems like something the farrier is doing, not just like 4 solid barefoot horses to go dead lame limping out if the blue... So very upset with that.

Yes he now has more turnout
Hasn't it been very wet in your area? More turnout in the wet can equal soft, tender soles. That is not a farrier issue.
 

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Hasn't it been very wet in your area? More turnout in the wet can equal soft, tender soles. That is not a farrier issue.
Any farrier worth their salt would know this and trim accordingly. Also, a barn full of lame barefoot horses that were all previously sound should be setting off alarm bells. Feed and farrier would be what I would blame, not wet ground.
My farrier always asks before he does the horses what their "schedule" for riding and showing is and any other fun tidbits about the horse. If he is doing a horse under a week before an event he is very careful and with new horses is also careful until he finds their "optimum" trim length. He trims several navicular horses barefoot at my barn and they are all sound right after a trim even with wet ground.

Anyways, OP good luck! It is really hard to stick with a trainer, especially when they don't have their own barn but it is sometimes necessary for our competition goals. Good for you for putting your horses health first! I hope you can get him healthy and happy and find a coach with similar goals to yours. Good luck!
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Any farrier worth their salt would know this and trim accordingly. Also, a barn full of lame barefoot horses that were all previously sound should be setting off alarm bells. Feed and farrier would be what I would blame, not wet ground.
My farrier always asks before he does the horses what their "schedule" for riding and showing is and any other fun tidbits about the horse. If he is doing a horse under a week before an event he is very careful and with new horses is also careful until he finds their optimum"
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So it's the farriers fault if the horses are standing in muck? Interesting theory.

Soft outside and hard indoors = sore feet. Farrier or feed doesn't play into it. We have one mare with soft feet. If it's wet for days - she gets tender.
 

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Any farrier worth their salt would know this and trim accordingly. Also, a barn full of lame barefoot horses that were all previously sound should be setting off alarm bells. Feed and farrier would be what I would blame, not wet ground.
Agreed 100% with Anebel! My mare has always been barefoot without issue as well, and if this happened to her I would know something was off...if it happened to her AND others who'd been previously fine and who had been trimmed by the same farrier, I would DEFINITELY take issue with the farrier!

And as for the trainer making a shoeing decision for you, that is just plain ridiculous on so many different levels!!! :evil: First of all, the difference in the cost of shod vs barefoot is a BIG one...I don't know about your area, but here in Ohio my bill for a trim is like $35. Shoes are hundreds. And second of all (and most importantly to me!), once you put holes in your horse's feet that's going to open him up for other issues, like abscesses just to name one. Now for a horse that needs shoes that's a sound risk to take to make sure your horse doesn't wear down his hooves too quickly, or just basically have them fall apart. But for your horse sounds like that was just a poor choice and your inexperienced trainer basically sticking a bandaid on the issue because that's all she knows how to do.

Either way, glad you're leaving...and the sooner the better, that trainer obviously isn't very well educated and it's sad that those people are out there, advertising themselves as experts. :-|
 

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So it's the farriers fault if the horses are standing in muck? Interesting theory.

Soft outside and hard indoors = sore feet. Farrier or feed doesn't play into it. We have one mare with soft feet. If it's wet for days - she gets tender.
My barefoot mare has been up to her knees in mud for about a year now, it's been wet since last spring here in Ohio with no chance for anything to dry up and all the pastures here are mud lots. I ride her every other day indoors, in a sand arena and the aisles in our barn are concrete. No issues whatsoever, and she's been at that barn for several years.

Not saying it can't be the case for other horses, just saying that given the OP's situation, that's not really the likely answer.
 

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You are doing right by Ollie. Just because you are with a certain trainer or certain barn at one time, does not mean they are for you forever, especially now that you have a special needs horse. It is business like any other. I drove a Chevy Lumina for years and yes, it suited me fine, but now I want to pull a horse trailer and have 4 wheel drive since I work nights and often drive when the roads are crappy in the winter, before the plows come out. I did not feel bad about selling my Lumina to get a truck. I loved my little silver beater, but it could not do what I wanted, through no fault of its own, so I had to move on.

Think of it like that. Your new place sounds fabulous and you and your horse deserve the best.

My other word of advice, is to seek your own vet and farriers based on what you like and are looking for, get recommendations if need be, by trusted sources! When I was a kid my trainer took care of the vet, farrier, etc. Believe it or not, there are terrible farriers out there. You can usually tell a good farrier because they have a waiting list or are not accepting new clients... BUT, the nice thing about moving to a nice barn (like the one you describe) is they often already use these great farriers and many will squeeze in one more horse if he is at a barn he already goes to.

Good luck, and let us know how it goes.
 

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I know she means well and is just very young...
There is a reason behind the saying "The road to H*ll is paved with good intentions"...

It makes absolutely NO difference if somebody "means well" if they are not doing the right thing. The end. Period.

Something happened that caused all the horses to get sore feet. Even if you are able to give the trainer the benefit of the doubt and assume that it was just a massive coincidence and not the fault of a poor farrier or wet footing - it is STILL wrong to then overwork those horses and try to go for a fast fix by just "slapping some shoes on".

Sounds like you are making the right choice by switching barns...

Best of luck!
 

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How much notice do you need to give before you move?
Are you serious? As has been said-take the horse ASAP, and let her try and take you to court for lack of notice.

I am very glad the shoes did not get put on....that would have created more issues. I am curious tho-as to what makes you think that the horse has immune issues? Just because of the pneumonia? I am guessing, just guessing here, that a person who would continue to work a sore horse most likely would not cool one off adequately, and perhaps THAT is where the pneumonia came from? I am also the she-devil when it comes to my animals or family-this girl would have been ripped a new one by now.......you are WAY to nice.
 

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Are you serious? As has been said-take the horse ASAP, and let her try and take you to court for lack of notice.

I am very glad the shoes did not get put on....that would have created more issues. I am curious tho-as to what makes you think that the horse has immune issues? Just because of the pneumonia? I am guessing, just guessing here, that a person who would continue to work a sore horse most likely would not cool one off adequately, and perhaps THAT is where the pneumonia came from? I am also the she-devil when it comes to my animals or family-this girl would have been ripped a new one by now.......you are WAY to nice.
I wasn't sure; it's something I wanted to at least ask about.
 
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