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Discussion Starter #1
Last time I wormed Ana she ended up colicing 3 days later. We don't know for sure that the wormer caused it because she coliced again a week later, so it could be completely unrelated....but, it's time to worm her again, this time with the Fenbendazole or Oxibendazole and I'm nervous! She coliced after we gave her Pyrantel Pamoate in August.

Here is her worming schedule:

Yearly Wormer Rotation Schedule Example
Feb - Pyrantel Pamoate done 02/22
Apr - Fenbendazole or Oxibendazole done 04/22
June - 1.87% Ivermectin done 06/22
Aug - Pyrantel Pamoate done 08/23
Oct - Fenbendazole or Oxibendazole - need to do
Dec - Ivermectin/Praziquantel combination - need to do

My question is, which one would cause the least stomach upset, fenbendazole or oxibendaxole? Also, is there a time of day where it's better to worm? She gets propiotics now with her morning meal.

I was going to do it in the morning, that way the stable helpers are around to watch her in case she goes down. Would it be better before a meal or after a meal? I know not to work her immediately after worming and not give it to her in extreme heat or cold.

Thanks in advance.
 

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Get a fecal done to find out if the wormer is even needed.
I second this.

I had a fecal on my guy done and the egg count was zero.
the tape worm, and something else, won't show up. But at least you'll know what you need to de-worm for.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
My vet doesn't believe in fecal egg count because not all worms shed, or something like that; he recommends the rotational wormer.
 

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They are both very safe wormers. Giving in the morning as you suggest is a good idea if you are concerned.
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I'd buy my own tests kits and send them in, just because a parasite does not shed well does not mean the tests aren't reliable as guidelines. I like to start (when working with a new to me horse) tests to see basic load and if they are resistant to basic drugs like Ivermectin and PP.
Praziquantel get's used in the fall/ early winter here regardless since tapeworms don't show in FECT's.

Vet's that won't switch to testing after seeing all of the research worry me personally. Not that they're bad vet's, but that they could be stuck in their ways which could potentially harm my horse because they don't want to change, even after the research is done and being implemented by most other vets.

Also it may not be the drugs themselves that caused the colic, but the dying off of a large load of parasites all at once.
 

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The colic could have been the result of a large die-off. A friend's horse had such a large die-off it plugged him up. Vet had to get in there and loosen it up. The horse had never been dewormed in it's 4 years.
 

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use the fenbendazole. Then in 4 - 6months use the ones to kill tape worms.
then in 4 - 6 months ivermectin. then fenbendazole. deworming every 2 months is a waste of money. If your horse has encased worms use fenbendazole, worm, wait 2-3 days worm wait 2-3 days worm.. set of 3 . I had one horse that took two attempts at the set of 3 and I swear she pooped a snake. She was fat, just had the runs.
If she is on pasture drag it to break up clumps of poo so the worms die. Rotate pastures so the grass recovers and the worm cycle dies.. Keep the poop out of the pens and have it carted off
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Well, I think her colic was unrelated to the worming. We just figured out this weekend that she has been stealing her pasture mates food! So for a while she was getting a double dose of feed!

Her pasture mate has been moved so that he can gain some weight. Hopefully Ana will lose some weight in the process.
 

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My vet doesn't believe in fecal egg count because not all worms shed, or something like that; he recommends the rotational wormer.
Does your vet "believe" in staying CURRENT with the research? (Doesn't sound like it.)

Deworming 6 times a year is the exact reason that worms are becoming resistant. The American Veterinary Medial Association recognizes that this is a huge problem and that you should do fecals to determine exactly what your horse needs.

I can't comment on the colic issue, because I've never had a horse colic from the deworming, but I can comment that you are over-medicating your horse. Your vet should know that.
 

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I don't actually use horse wormer anymore. What we use is called Diatomaceous earth, its actually good for the horses and will kill all the parasites in their body. It won't harm them at all. And its got minerals and a lot that they need. You can also use it on their body to keep bugs off of them. Its non toxic and the parasites can't live through it. It's very sharp to the worms (Like powder to us and them) and works very well. And humans can consume it too. We actually drink it in water, milk, and orange juice and its very good for us. Diatomaceous earth | The Equine Nutrition Nerd
 
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