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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello my name is Elad I'm from Israel (no politic please) 36 years old
I'm riding horses since the age of 6 with long breaks and riding style changes
from the age of 6 till the age of 12 I rode english style then took a long break of 12 years and back to the saddle on age of 24 and rode english style until the age of 28 during this time I lost my vision and found it challenging to find out a good english riding farm who has a therapeutic riding for blind people in my area so I had no choice then changing riding style to western (He he I know that's funny but I'm going to western riding dressed in a professional english clothing)
I love both styles and finding out advantages in both of them after all as long as I'm on the saddle I'm happy
 

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I would think that people would re-direct all that energy from the visual cortex of the brain to the cerebellum that controls balance and proprioception. "








The cerebellum (which is Latin for “little brain”) is a major structure of the hindbrain that is located near the brainstem. This part of the brain is responsible for coordinating voluntary movements. It is also responsible for a number of functions including motor skills such as balance, coordination, and posture.


noun: proprioception; plural noun: proprioceptions

perception or awareness of the position and movement of the body.


Welcome to this fun, horsey forum. In life you have gotten a lemon but you are making lemonaide. Do you find you have more feeling of the movements and mood of the horse than before? Do you have more awareness of your own body movements? Do you have a feeling of oneness with the horse? We all strive for that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Hi all
First, Thanks for all the warm welcome wishes
How come I’m riding as a blind? that’s simple the horse sees where to go…:)
Now seriously…first, Yes the horse indeed sees where he goes you know a normal good and well trained horse wouldn’t crash himself into the field’s fence and as a blind rider it’s extremely important to choose such horse I won’t mount a wild stallion during the Estrus period inside a field full of in heat mares it’s has to be easy to control horse
The instructor has a very important part in navigating me inside the field
explaining to me where I’m and I do count the horse’s steps and know exactly how many steps are the short/long side of the field
when I performing exercises I always aware to my position inside the field where I should begin the exercise and where I should end
 

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Welcome!

I volunteer at a therapy riding place and think all our therapy riders are amazing in what they can achieve.

I hope you enjoy your riding journey.
 

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Welcome Elad...
I applaud your want and ability to sense where you are, allow the horse to perform keeping you safe and for finding a instructor who can instruct visual clarity to you to control the animal you sit astride and do what you are doing.

I've never ridden blindfolded and sightless. A daunting thought to not see your surroundings yet you must communicate and trust your mount to keep you safe..
I can't wait to read more of your adventures riding...
🐴 ...
 

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I would think that people would re-direct all that energy from the visual cortex of the brain to the cerebellum that controls balance and proprioception. "
That about sums up the human part of the equation. The horse you have to be able to trust implicitly.

Familiarity with your environment and where you are riding though riding out of your normal space with others is certainly possible.

Never perfect but until the last couple of years correctable that allowed for normal activity mine has deteriorated. When I got my first horse and was having trouble finding my center and riding with the horse instead of against it my instructor asked me to ride without contacts and glasses. It really does completely change your perception and focus. I was extremely fortunate to have had the horse I had. She really took care of her rider and i was able to have complete trust and faith in her.
 
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