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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys, this is my second post on the Horse Forum, and since I got so much help on my first one, I thought I'd try it again! I just recently leased out my horse on a year long care lease because he was becoming too much for me (young thoroughbred that was underweight and not fit when we bought him, but quickly started to feel better) so now we have started the search for another horse for me to ride and hopefully do some hunters with (im 15) we have a horse lined up that is incredible and is more than likely the one we are getting. He is a 7 year old Czech warmblood import (imported 2 and a half years ago) and he is 16.2hh. The reason I have come on here is because I've NEVER owned a warmblood before. Only hard keeping, energetic thoroughbreds. This horse is a hunter and prefers to go slow, which I like. So because I've never owned a horse like him, I guess I'm wondering what kind of diet they eat, hay types, and what kinds of grain do people suggest for them. Recommendations on tack would also be very helpful. Also looking to set up some kind of a ride schedule with him. So if anyone seeing this has a warmblood hunter/jumper, I'd love to know what you feed, tack you use, and a good riding schedule that has worked out well for your horse. TIA!
 

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I don't actually own any horses, but I've leased (or part-boarded, I don't know what you call it) hunters and I ride at a hunter barn, so most of them are what you're describing! The feed depends on if the horse is an easy or a hard keeper, for easy keepers you can use basically any kind of grain, for hard keepers high-fat food works best. I use all-purpose saddles and all-purpose saddle pads, Val du Bois is an amazing brand. The lease schedule I had was riding 4 times a week, and I was the only one that rode them since it was a green lease, meaning I sort of trained them (they were already broken in, just not very used to things yet). They were quite fit, I also sometimes went up to the barn to do groundwork on days when I didn't ride. Hope this helps!
 

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Actually forage first is the way to approach diet. Easy or hard you want fiber not filler. All horses are individuals and you feed them as such.

As for tack, tack that fits and suits the discipline you are riding in.
 

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I don't own a warmblood, but just like any horse they can be easy or hard keepers. His old owner should be able to give you information on that and your trainer will also be able to help you with that. For the saddle no horse breed is going to always fit into one specific saddle. Although warmbloods are usually built uphill, just like any other horse each individual horse will be different. Have a saddle fitter come out and look at your horse and help you get a well fitting saddle.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I don't actually own any horses, but I've leased (or part-boarded, I don't know what you call it) hunters and I ride at a hunter barn, so most of them are what you're describing! The feed depends on if the horse is an easy or a hard keeper, for easy keepers you can use basically any kind of grain, for hard keepers high-fat food works best. I use all-purpose saddles and all-purpose saddle pads, Val du Bois is an amazing brand. The lease schedule I had was riding 4 times a week, and I was the only one that rode them since it was a green lease, meaning I sort of trained them (they were already broken in, just not very used to things yet). They were quite fit, I also sometimes went up to the barn to do groundwork on days when I didn't ride. Hope this helps!
He is just turning 8 this year, so he is younger, but not green as he was started younger and consistently ridden ever since. So he may be considered slightly green but im not 100% sure. So with what your telling me im thinking 3 to 4 rides per week would be good, I have a jump lesson once a week, so I can incorporate that as one of my rides, and then I always like to do just a lunge day once a week to keep the training there. And this horse is definitely an easy keeper, so I assume I can use lower fat grain just as a treat with any supplements he gets and things. Thanks so much for the info!
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Actually forage first is the way to approach diet. Easy or hard you want fiber not filler. All horses are individuals and you feed them as such.

As for tack, tack that fits and suits the discipline you are riding in.
Thanks for the info! This horse is certainly an easier keeper, so some kind of grain super low fat as a treat to go with any supplements he gets and suck i think would work great, but I will consult with my trainer and the previous owners for more info. Totally agree, hay is most important so ill get some info from previous owners about hay they feed and what they feed in general! Thanks for the help!
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I don't own a warmblood, but just like any horse they can be easy or hard keepers. His old owner should be able to give you information on that and your trainer will also be able to help you with that. For the saddle no horse breed is going to always fit into one specific saddle. Although warmbloods are usually built uphill, just like any other horse each individual horse will be different. Have a saddle fitter come out and look at your horse and help you get a well fitting saddle.
Yes, saddle fitters are a must! We will definitely be doing that. Definitely going to speak with my trainer and the previous owners on what they feed him and what we should feed him. He's an easy keeper so im thinking some kind of super low fat grain as a treat to go with any supplements he gets, and ill have to find out which hay he ate. He is in great shape and a perfect weight right now, so I'll probably stick to the diet he is already on! Thanks for your help!
 

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I leased a warmblood/thbd cross years ago. He was a really nice, honest horse. He was mostly lazy and reequired a sometimes frustrating amount of leg. But, oncce the 'engine' of the warmblood kicks into gear, they can be really, ,really strong. His spooks always involved a lunge forward, and a dash down one side of the arena before I could bring him in again. Then, it was back to legging hard to get him to move out with energy. But, he was so kind, so beautiful and loveable. Very nice fellow.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I leased a warmblood/thbd cross years ago. He was a really nice, honest horse. He was mostly lazy and reequired a sometimes frustrating amount of leg. But, oncce the 'engine' of the warmblood kicks into gear, they can be really, ,really strong. His spooks always involved a lunge forward, and a dash down one side of the arena before I could bring him in again. Then, it was back to legging hard to get him to move out with energy. But, he was so kind, so beautiful and loveable. Very nice fellow.
Thanks so much for the info! This horse is certainly NOT spooky, this was one of my main musts when horse shopping so luckily I hopefully won't have to deal with that kind of thing often lol, thanks for the advice!
 
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