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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I rode her and walked her when I went to see her and she was a dream. I got her home and could barely even walk her to the barn it was such a fight. After a few days to calm down I tried to walk her again still a fight. I texted the woman who sold her to me and she said oh she has no ground manners. She is better under saddle with the bridle.

I do not want to ride a horse with no ground manners even though I have seen what she could do. I have a trainer coming to help me as I don't want to mess this horse up.

We have her on mare magic to calm her nerves because the woman we bought her from suggested it.

I am just scared she was drugged when I bought her and I don't know what the best thing to do with her is or if anyone has had this problem. She has only been turned to the pasture once in the past three days only because I am waiting on the trainer who should be here in a couple days.

She appears to be super hyper and was drenched in sweat in her stall. We brushed her but it is way to cold for that which was the second reason for the calming herbs.

She is a 5 year old quarter horse mare with a strong reining foundation
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
4 she is nervous and in a new situation so the behavior is totally understandable but her owner said she is like that in general all the time
And I haven't worked with her just barn to trailer and barn to pasture on the third day pasture to barn type walking. We lunged her on the third day to try to get some of her energy out because we couldn't get her back to the barn from the pasture. She is obviously scared. So we have been taking it easy and just brushing her mucking her stall being around type things. I don't plan to ride anytime soon. I just need to figure out a plan for when she is more used to the move. And she side passes to move away.
 

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What is your level of experience with horse handling? Is she at a barn with other horses or kept alone the last 4 days?
 

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Honestly do not think this is horse for you.

And could have been drugged, worked extremely hard when you saw her before, or who knows what.

Might have a screw loose too that previous owner knew how to deal with.
 

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Agreed this just may not be the horse for you. You sound somewhat scared/intimidated by her and that can make things get worse.

The best thing to do, if you decide to keep her, is to get a trainer and some education. Get some videos on groundwork and manners and start teaching her.
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Did you see this horse before purchasing it?

Did you lead her? Work with her? Ride her?

You for sure need someone competent in horses to help overcome this as it seems like your too nervous to deal with her naughty behavior.
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
She will be ok here I have enough help and support. I am not scared of her either. When I lunged her she did not buck or rear or kick she did as I asked. And a lot of their bad behavior is shown on the lunge line. And she walks the direction I ask she isn't trying to go another way she is just very adhd. Like she wants to see where that bird went and she wants to see what the trailer is. so she kind of dances.

I have no problem working her hard before I work with her on the ground but the woman made it sound like it was a walk from point a to point b and then they would saddle her up.

I just don't understand because I want my horse to respect me on the ground before the saddle and I have always heard that if they don't respect you on the ground they won't respect you on the saddle. But I looked it up and it can be the case that they are better under saddle.

I have supervision and a closed in outdoor sand arena. I could ride her or I could wait several months to make sure her groundwork is down.

But if she is better under saddle and my trainer rides her first should I continue to ride her and do the ground work at the same time.

I can do ground work especially with all the help I have. Just never had a horse with her particular problem and thank you very much.
 

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If the woman didn't tell you about this problem before you bought the mare then you really have some grounds for sending her back
Mare magic isn't a sedative - its just raspberry leaves and said to have some effect on hormonal problems that some mares get when in season. There are some supplements that might help - stuff containing magnesium, valerian root (Quietex) and Thiamin as in Grand Calm - but I wouldn't want to rely on any of them if the horse is as hyped up as you describe
I honestly think you might be dangerously out of your depth with a horse that could have some actual health problem that needs looking into
 

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I wasnt trying to be rude in my above post:wink: serious think about finding a good well trained horse. To many good ones to put up with the pain in the neck ones.
 

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I would forget about riding until you get the ground manners under control and she shows respect. When you looked at her to buy was she already all saddled up and ready to go? Sadly a lot of people don't know that you should really ask to either catch, or watch the owner catch the horse, groom it, tack it up, and ride it before you think of buying. When they are already caught there is no telling what they could have given the horse before you got there. Also, you can't tell what the ground manners are like if you don't see them.

If this were my horse, I would do ground work, ground work, and more ground work. This horse does not respect you or probably anyone and has most likely either gotten away with the behavior or been drugged out of it. Is it fixable, most likely. However it can probably take a month or more of daily sessions on what is appropriate behavior and what isn't. I wouldn't ride until I knew I had full respect.
 

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FWIW this mare is not in heat this time of year in Ohio unless she was under lights. Mare magic and all that stuff is a great way to separate you from your money.

Since you have a trainer coming in and it is someone good and who you trust (I hope anyway!) then go with that. A horse that stands in a box stall stress sweating has some real issues. Did you get a full PPE from a vet of your choice? Will the seller take her back?

If no to both questions, then you have a project to work through or a mess to sell and lose money on.

Let us know what your trainer says. It would be interesting to see video of this horse acting freakish. Might better help you too.
 

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It shouldn't take months to get groundwork in order, a week or two should be plenty to get her manageable.

The reason poor ground manners are common even with horses that ride well is that people spend a lot of time in the saddle and none on the ground. They don't demand good ground manners and so they don't get them.

It's hard to explain online because most of it is feel, but I'd start with the basics free lunging. Constantly turning her, at first you want her to always face you, but you also want her to keep her attention on you, moving her body depending where your body. Then I'd get her yielding to pressure, backing etc. When you start walking her you wouldn't be doing just walking in straight lines but constantly changing it up, 5 steps and then yield hindquarters around, another five steps then back up etc. Never let her in your space, if you want to be close to her you walk into her space. If she crowds you send her away, if her attention is elsewhere make her move. Always release all pressure when she does what you want. Sometimes the best reward is turning and walking away.

When my mare first came here she was all over the place. Leading her from paddock to paddock she'd be spinning around me circles, quivering, sweating, pulling, almost knocking me down. Looking at anything but me, but once she learned I was the leader she calmed down a lot because it meant she was safe, protected.
 

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First off,I'm not trying to be rude by any means but don't let people discourage you when they say this horse may not be the one for you. I only say this because my horse was very intimidating and MEAN when I got her. She would chase me and everything. She quickly had me figured out. I have had this mare for 4 yrs in December.
Also,Mare Magic really doesn't help that much. It's just raspberry leaves. You need a mixture of different herbs or atleast I did with my mare. I got a supplement through smartpak. Check it out..I think it's called CalmMare. It works but I don't use it anymore as it was $40 a month and I had other expenses for her and to be honest she is fine without it.
Your horse sounds like she just knows you are intimidated. You NEED to take charge and show her you are boss and not her.If she sucks at groundwork now is the time to get out there and work her. Work on backing up,lunging both ways,leading,stopping and don't be afraid. If she tries to be violent dont be afraid of giving her one good whack with a lunge whip. It's not going to hurt her but she will think twice. I ended up hitting my horse pretty good because she reared up and was trying to come down on me when lunging..she had NO ground manners and after that she lunges just fine!...I know I probably sound abusive but horses are a large animal and if you don't do something they will.
Have your trainer come out and hopefully they can fix the issue. Ground work is key to a good riding horse. If they aren't respectful on the ground they won't be in the saddle.
 

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make sure you do tons of groundwork every chance you get. I would suggest looking at Parelli techniques for groundwork - they have some great ideas and they help a lot with ground manners.
 

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If this horse was basically a pasture horse then she sees the barn and stall as traps, and they are. I'd try the approach and back up starting about 50' away. Don't look at her but at the barn. When you feel her hesitate, turn and back her up to where you started. Then turn back toward the barn and start walking. She may get stuck at the same place a few times so be patient. She will get tired of backing and will begin to move closer. When you get to the doorway, just stand there and let her look around. If she goes in, even a step or two, back her out and take her for a walk to about half way. This takes the pressure off her. Then start again. You don't want this turning into a fight. You can even leave a pan with treats in it just far enough inside that she'll consider going in. Then bring her out and back to mid way again. Now she's thinking about that pan. Add more treats. When her head is down eating she is relaxed and that is what you want. Don't put her in a stall at this time but leave her out in a paddock with another or pasture. She may be hesitant the next time you enter the barn so back her up a good 30' then go forward again. This time set the pan farther into the barn. When she's done just stand there with her and go with her if she wants to check things out. Let her do it without influencing her. If she wants to leave, that's ok. Just go for your walk and bring her back. When she seems ok with the barn, show her her stall. She'll go in when she's ready if she sees the treat pan in there. When done, take her back outside and come back again. Again leave her out for the night if you can. Because a horse can see out of it's stall it is convinced a predator can catch it and the horse can't escape. Gradually increase her stall time and stay with her with the door open. This may take a week but it's better than having her living with a lot of stress.
 

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This work takes time, but the horse does not know that...they have NO timetable! Only do this work when you have no time constraints, because horses DO know when you are frustrated, in a hurry, etc. You just have to keep working until you get what you want, which is ONE GOOD thing, then STOP.

THis is much easier in the winter than summer, at least you are not in the blazing sun for hours!!!


Nancy
 

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I'm glad you're getting a trainer involved, I think that's smart but just to share a little of my own story. My mare was an absolute b)$:** the first week I owned her. She did not react well to change and now I know that about her. I took all of the changes in her environment and feed for granted and she reacted with a lot of fear that manifested some not so desirable behaviors. I took her back to ground zero (in her case this meant no grain, separate from other horse and grazing on a line) and gradually phased her in to everything else. Now, after about 6 weeks she is on the feed I want, out to pasture and acting very well behaved. We've also been working a lot on ground manners. The sweating in the stall thing does concern me, but if the stall is new to her maybe it is just severe severe fear or anxiety. Good luck!
 

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It could be the stall thing.
My mare doesn't do stalls. At all. At bests she paces and sweats at worst she rears. She works herself up that much it is impossible to get anything out of her.

So I gave up on stalls. She has no need to use them and we had small day yard to confine if injured with sheds.
 
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