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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I would like to get a 2 horse trailer. My husband has a Toyota Tundra with a 10k towing capacity. We have a long, narrow driveway that I would have to back the trailer up into and with that big truck it doesn't leave much room for error. I am wondering if a smaller Tacoma might be better for my situation. It has a max towing capacity of 6.8k. I only have one horse now and plan on getting one more in the future. Any advice would be appreciated. I have never driven with a trailer and am a bit intimidated by the thought but we have had several fires where I live and it is really important that I be able to evacuate my horse if needed.
 

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The answer to me is do not downsize to a smaller truck cause you won't be in safe towing parameters.
A 2-horse trailer is going to weigh in empty someplace in the range of 2,000 - 8,000 depending upon what you choose... a large range but you will probably land someplace in the mid-range weight wise "empty"[email protected] 4,000 pounds.
Now many horses weigh in at the 1,000 pound range per animal.
Now you need to add in weight for what you will be carrying with you such as tack and equipment adds up quickly.
And the biggest part of this is no truck manufacturer ever does a live load capacity for towing....
Manufacturers tow and do their "suggested" capacity using camping trailers, jet-ski and cargo trailers...dead weight!
From those who are experienced in the horse towing field and industry it is recommended you never take a truck to its limits especially with live cargo {livestock/horses} as live cargo is much more taxing to the vehicle than a "dead load"...
The other reason for staying with a full-size truck is your essential components of brakes, cooling, transmission are often heavier duty made along with a heavier frame you must have to secure your frame hitch to tow safely and more importantly, stop safely and with control using your trucks brake assist devices. The longer and wider wheelbase also gives you in the truck a better ride which in turn gives your trailer/horses a batter ride...
I personally would not want to be towing a trailer down the road that outweighs me nor is longer or wider than my truck is...the bigger the trailer the bigger the truck needed for your safety and ability to control it at all times.
When you do the math, you understand needing a full size truck for your safety and that of your horse{s} and those who will be sharing the road with you.

As for backing up the driveway... consider redesigning your driveway to allow a pull-up and back into a side space if possible... Dynamics of trailer clearances backing up grades may have you bottoming out your trailer tail or dragging your hitch which both cause damages and un-needed repairs....
You can learn to back-up of course but for many reasons, it might be more practical to look at a redesign or option of something else if at all possible.
That should get you some new ideas and information to start exploring trailers, towing and handling practices.

My apologies for the typo errors...I despise auto-correct! Hopefully now when reading it makes better sense.
馃惔...
 

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Joined
44 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The answer to me is do not downsize to a smaller truck cause you won't be in safe towing parameters.
A 2-horse trailer is going to weigh in empty someplace in the range of 2,000 - 8,000 depending upon what you choose... a large range but you will probably land someplace in the mid-range weight wise "empty"[email protected] 4,000 pounds.
Now many horses weigh in at the 1,000 pound range per animal.
Now you need to add in weight for what you will be carrying with you such as tack and equipment adds up quickly.
And the biggest part of this is no truck manufacturer ever does a live load capacity for towing....
Manufacturers tow and do their "suggested" capacity using camping trailers, jet-ski and cargo trailers...dead weight!
From those who are experienced in the horse towing field and industry it is recommended you never take a truck to its limits especially with live cargo {livestock/horses} as live cargo is much more taxing to the vehicle than a "dead load"...
The other reason for staying with a full-size truck is your essential components of brakes, cooling, transmission are often heavier duty made along with a heavier frame you must have to secure your frame hitch to tow safely and more importantly, stop safely and with control using your trucks brake assist devices. The longer and wider wheelbase also gives you in the truck a better ride which in turn gives your trailer/horses a batter ride...
I personally would not want to be towing a trailer down the road that outweighs me nor is longer or wider than my truck is...the bigger the trailer the bigger the truck needed for your safety and ability to control it at all times.
When you do the math, you understand needing a full size truck for your safety and that of your horse{s} and those who will be sharing the road with you.

As for backing up the driveway... consider redesigning your driveway to allow a pull-up and back into a side space if possible... Dynamics of trailer clearances backing up grades may have you bottoming out your trailer tail or dragging your hitch which both cause damages and un-needed repairs....
You can learn to back-up of course but for many reasons, it might be more practical to look at a redesign or option of something else if at all possible.
That should get you some new ideas and information to start exploring trailers, towing and handling practices.

My apologies for the typo errors...I despise auto-correct! Hopefully now when reading it makes better sense.
馃惔...
Thank you for your very thoughtful reply. It was very helpful and I have decided to practice using my husbands Tundra then getting the trailer.
 
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