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Iv recently discovers natural horsemanship and wonderd what sort of things should I start with, I don't have a field, pen or school to work in just yet but intend on getting something hopefully a round pen I'm also 20 weeks pregnant so want to do everything on the ground. And work on and get a bond with my horse. What do people suggest and what are their opinions
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I would have you read a book titled Horsemanship through Feel by Bill Dorrance. It is not a step by step manual if that is what you are trying to find. But he writes very simply and will get you started in understanding feel.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I would have you read a book titled Horsemanship through Feel by Bill Dorrance. It is not a step by step manual if that is what you are trying to find. But he writes very simply and will get you started in understanding feel.
That sounds great will look it up :)
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Hi, I'm far from a 'parelli follower but I still reckon for beginners, his original book will give you a good start. I think his original principles are sound. As with everything though, analyse what you are told & question the whys & wherefores. Also a good book for understanding training principles is 'Don't Shoot The Dog' by Karen prior.

'Natural horsemanship' to my mind is just good horsemanship. It's about working with the horse and being considerate of their... Horsiness. So understanding what that's about, how they think & communicate is vital. So the more you can learn about equine behaviour, learning, body language, the better. Watching horses interact is also a good learning opportunity.
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loosie, I see that you are located in Australia; just wondering what your thoughts are on Carlos Tabernaberri? I have read his book and seen some of his youtube videos; I like what I have seen so far, what about you?
 

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Hi,

Yes, he's local too, so I've seen quite a few horses trained by him. I really like Carlos, from what I've seen & read, of his DVD & book, and of the horses I've met from him, but I've only seen him personally once for a very short spell at Equitana, because I was rushing past to a Guy McLean demo & had never heard of Carlos at the time!
 

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Find a instructor/trainer in your area that practices natural horsemanship. They will give you some stuff to work on and some advice.
 

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Hey horsefan, just have to comment on your awesome avatar pic! Do you know what kind of fruit he's reaching for? Not the stuff that makes them drunk I gather, unless he's just started, because he probably wouldn't have the balance! I think that fruit is Amarillo or some such & there was a doco some years back showing hilarious drunk monkeys, ele's, girraffes & such, after eating it!
 

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Work on getting your horse to lead well. Do you have a rope halter or use a chain over the nose? Use a nice long lead shank or rope about 12' long. Carry crop. In the US western trainers like the horse to follow. The Brits like the handler where the jaw connects to the neck. Hold the lead about 30" from the halter. Focus on an object a good 75' away, click to him and start walking. Don't look at him as you need to keep your shoulders square. If he doesn't step up, reach back with your left hand and tap his rib. If he walks too fast just have him circle you. Don't yank on him to keep him back. Resume walking and focusing farther away. With enough practise, your horse will become so light that if you closed your eyes you'd wonder if he was still attached to the line.
 

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Iv recently discovers natural horsemanship and wonderd what sort of things should I start with, I don't have a field, pen or school to work in just yet but intend on getting something hopefully a round pen I'm also 20 weeks pregnant so want to do everything on the ground. And work on and get a bond with my horse. What do people suggest and what are their opinions
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Oh how I hate the term "natural horsemanship", but I guess it's become such a standard that it's never going to go away.

:lol: To paraphrase and try to sum up a few of the fundamental basics of what I was taught by some of the best horsemen I've ever known (long before anyone started with "Natural horsemanship").
  • Beyond the physical and medical, there are few things that are always common to every horse (e.g. herd animals, etc...), just as there are few things that are common to every person. There are many things common to many people, but just as many or more different variations.
  • Every horse is an individual with it's own personality so learn the horse.
  • Never think that what works with one will work with all. There are many ways to teach something. Find one that works best (if the horse fights it or doesn't get it, then it's not best)
  • Never work on training when you're not at your best. Stop if you get frustrated and do something WITH the horse that it knows and will succeed at so that all training ends positively for you both.
  • They have long memories so set backs can result in having to retrain something.
  • When a horse trusts you it's easier to deal with.
Of course there is a LOT more to it. About 90% of it is using common sense. As a young teen I was given my first horse to train and, as silly as this might seem to some, for the first couple of weeks all I was allowed to do was feed her, handle her (halter, groom, lead). Once she lead well I had to take her on walks for the next couple of months, like you would a dog, to visit various relatives so that it was always a mile or more and along roads and a highway. This was all I was allowed to do for those months, but my mentors knew what they were talking about and they were right. By the time a few months had passed I "knew" that horse. How she reacted to new things, how she "thought", etc... and she had began to really trust me.

It wasn't like the things I hear people talk about today (which always seems like a sales pitch to me), but these old timers turned out some fabulous animals that rode the roads unshod, worked all day dependably and went anywhere you asked them to. I'm always wishing I'd written it all down. They never did, because they'd been doing it since their youth (when horses were the transportation and farm equipment) so it was like driving a car...they'd done it so much they didn't really have to think about it.
Of the real strange thing, when compared to today, is that they were always glad to assist anyone (even if you weren't related to them like I was). There was never any talk of money. You couldn't have paid them. They'd have been insulted. They saw the knowledge as something that should be shared so others could become horsemen (or horsewomen :lol:)
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
You don't have a field, pen or school. Does your horse live in the barn all the time?
hi no i live in south wales so working in his field is out of the question as it is soo boggy hes out for a couple of hours during the day but stabled other than that .
 
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