The Horse Forum banner
1 - 20 of 116 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,306 Posts
I’m sorry! That’s really too bad, but you are so lucky you have a creek! You could lead the horses down to drink a couple times a day if you were too desperate.

We would have to go to my parents’ house or the shop and fill the water truck.
 
  • Like
Reactions: TrainedByMares

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,306 Posts
Your life is filled with more colorful things than mine! I can’t imagine riding into a meth lab. If I were you, I would pack a gun. You could pack a pistol with the clip out but easily accessible. I think a rifle would be too slow. I am too afraid of accidents and strict with gun safety myself to have something loaded. 😊

The whole idea frightens me. Not the riding in the mountains, but the rest of it. I have only ever been scared of a man at work once, and when I reached for a gun there was not one to be found in the pickup, and that both surprised and frightened me!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,306 Posts
I know we have meth, but everyone knows who the users are and they still seem safe enough. I don’t think there is any heroine, but I probably wouldn’t know. I don’t believe there are any hidden meth labs or anything of that sort though, and definitely not in the mountains.

I REALLY didn’t like not having a gun when I thought I might need it.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,306 Posts
I think you are right, that people have to have some sort of innate desire to ride. Many people grow up and ranches and leave it all behind easily, hoping to never ride again. I have a rule with my girls, “you don’t have to ride for a hobby, but you have to ride enough to be competent to get your job done until you leave home.”

My oldest didn’t love horses until Bones. Cutting brought out a spark in her, and now it is all she dreams about. She cannot wait to get back on a horse, or should I say back onto Bones. It took that for her, and the drive was born. She naturally was talented, naturally rode a horse well. She is extremely coachable, and I could put her on a colt when it was necessary, or if her sister was crying because a horse was trying to buck with her or run away she could get on and deal with it. (That sounds awful, but I was always on a baby, and I couldn’t trade my youngest when these things happened. They were so tiny too, I remember Pete trying to buck off my youngest when she was 8 or 9, and the job was blowing up, calves running everywhere, and it was panic central, and the oldest took care of it at 10.)

There is a lot of pressure, and I can understand people walking away. Often they are people who do have some sort of talent with horses, but they have to like them.

Most people do not have to ride for their living. I read a quote I really liked about people saying the world was better off when it required horses. It said the world was better for the horse when it no longer did, and only those who wanted to use a horse did.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,306 Posts
@egrogan your post made me think about something. Kids at school I guess… those naturally gifted children that eventually seem to struggle, and those children who have to work at every step who end up flourishing. I think you will fall into the latter category, and I think that is a good thing.

Now, I do have horses who respond as soon as I think. I didn’t give it much thought, as it seems I always have. There are those like Cashman, who often takes a bit longer to respond so you wouldn’t notice, and those like Queen on the other side of the spectrum. A though begins and she is intensely jumping into action. Bones was intense for me too, but now it seems we are relearning one another.

This said, the horse who taught me the most of any horse I have ridden about training, that horse did not do that. I had to learn to specifically teach him every move I wanted. He couldn’t be conned and couldn’t be bullied. He was a slow learner too, but when he did learn he was solid. The General, many would argue, became the best horse I have ever made. Now, he wasn’t my favorite, but I did have a respect for him and I still carry a gratitude to him.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,306 Posts
Riding other people’s horses has a sense of “job,” for sure. I have done it before, and I did enjoy my work, but I did not get my own horses ridden. So, then that guilt you talked about comes on.

I too have that. I feel a sense of guilt every time I choose not to ride. Cashman and Queen make it worse, whinnying ever time I step out the door, or spending the day solemn with their head over the gate staring in my windows. Since I rode Bones down and to work he joins them in their pity party. He threw a massive temper tantrum yesterday when the little girl and I rode. Today he just banged the fence when I took my two out and the whole time I had them out.

I also don’t get that feeling often in regards to family duties. I do get it if I sit around, but if I am working I don’t. I guess that does say something about us.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,306 Posts
Good! You should be!!

One time I was working on dragging a log with a baby Bones. Husband rode a horse called Charlie back then. I was proud of myself and he said he could do it, and I called bs that he could pull it without Charlie spooking.

Charlie was a broke horse mind you, and had been roped on a ton. So, husband goes and ropes this log and goes to pull it. Charlie blew up! He wasn’t expecting it and Charlie almost got him. Boy I laughed. It took a long time for that horse to agree to pull the log.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,306 Posts
Oh @gottatrot, I thought he was a Bernese Mountain Dog. It’s funny, because Opie was sold at a fair as an Australian Shepard I think, but he was the epitome of the Bernese Mountain Dog. All of the pups looked exactly the same too. I didn’t know the breed existed until years later.

Opie was never a cowdog. He was such a good pet though. He loved everyone, but wasn’t a jump on people kind of dog. He was perfect with our tiny kids, and my cousins who were young and lived down the road. Everyone loved that big dog.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,306 Posts
@egrogan those dogs are pretty and look very much like the Australian Shepards we have commonly here. We didn’t think anything of Opie being different as a pup, but he grew up to look exactly like the mountain dogs, and we knew he was no Shepard. It took a couple years after his death for me to realize there was the breed. He wasn’t an expensive pup, being sold as something he wasn’t. Lol. He was about going rate for a cowdog pup at the time, which years ago was $250.

We joked about him having been the most expensive cowdog pup we’d ever purchased, and then he had no desire to even consider being a cowdog. Lol. Since him I’ve never seen another in this area, although if I were looking for a pet I would definitely consider one. If they are all like him, he was lovely.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,306 Posts
All of ours, excepting Beamer, are rough on dogs. They know when you are riding that they are supposed to ignore the dogs, but any given the chance will tear one up. Well, Zeus is mostly good. He is himself a big dog though, so he could be rough playing accidentally.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,306 Posts
I don’t think it will last too long. She’s just a baby. I didn’t have to watch Junie B, because horses intimidated her. I actually was worried about it when she was small. Cows and horses scared her to death, and I was sure she would be a defective cowdog. Lol

She grew up to be aggressive as any I’ve seen, but very controlled. I am so happy with how she is now, but then I was convinced she wouldn’t be good. Husband kept reminding me of how Ozzy napped with the baby goats when he was tiny, and he was convinced he would be awful. I remember him scolding the little pup, “They are not supposed to be your friends!”

He grew up good too. A bit far on the aggressive scale too. I think he was under foot a lot, but he outgrew it. Mostly, as I said he gets in front of my horse sometimes and drives me crazy. I let biters reach down for him, but Cash is a striker and I don’t allow that. If you just yell at him he’ll move over anyways, but it is irritating.

I think the pup is just so tiny right now that she’s probably a bit unaware. Give it a couple weeks and she’ll pay more attention.
 
1 - 20 of 116 Posts
Top