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No, I mean someone holds onto his actual head so that he can’t kill anyone. Lol. They are broncs, not colts. They get let out of the chute with a halter on, but if you’ve seen a full grown non halter broke horse you know that’s only worth enough until you get an actual hold on him.
 

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Discussion Starter · #422 ·
Success! Today was a different day with Nicki for sure. We saddled up in the morning , I rasped the flares off her long hooves and walked ,trotted and loped in the round pen. Going around to the right she still wanted to fall in but she held it together. When she got too fast or was trying to dive in, I would slow it all down to a walk and just practice the exercise we learned from @Knave and then try again. I stopped several times to stretch and twist.We rode around the outside of the pen and she was near perfect,just loping around to the right and the pen preventing her from falling in! We did some figure eights in the field beside and called it quits. She was a bit trippy in the field from being long.

I saddled Jesse up,rasped her fronts a bit and same thing, walk,trot lope in the pen. To the left was fine after some initial bucks, to the right she was falling in at the trot. Then fedex arrived, daughter started the lawnmower and neighbors horses were stirred up about something so we did some simple figure eights in the field and ended on that note.

No pictures today, just the update. I was thoughtful and not reactive. I kept thinking ' this is how I want it to go and I am going to make it happen' and I told Nicki 'we are going to do this right' .

It is very humid , 100% according to the weather service and my jeans and t-shirt and helmet liner were soaked in sweat. Yuck! I don't mind being covered in two things: horse hair and beach sand and I sure could do without being covered in sweat!
 

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Training and riding horses is dangerous work. My hat is off to anyone who puts their heart into this. The day I picked up Nicki, the breeder gave me a piece of advice I never forgot. He said the day you think you know everything about horses is the day you're going to get hurt. So true.
Yep. Or the day you relax and go off with the fairies. I somehow managed to escape major injuries in my life doing all sorts of wild things with horses, mostly alone on trails. So many hairy situations, so much speed and remoteness, wildlife crossing unexpectedly etc. And the worst injury I ever got was four years ago, when I was riding a now very experienced horse who I could communicate almost telepathically with, at a walk just going around the back of our house to the trail head, not expecting anything to go wrong and relaxed as a rag doll. He did a tiny spook backwards and I fell off and under him, landing at a funny angle and breaking three bones in my midfoot. I'd never broken a bone in my whole life and I'd not fallen off this horse in half a decade, saving overshoots when mounting bareback.

There was a question on another members journal about how to inspire a spouse or partner to ride. The hard reality is you cannot make anything happen like that. It has to be an organic sea-change in that person that would lead them to desire to ride. If you have a spouse or partner that is supportive of you and your riding, if the horses like them and it is a generally positive environment for all, then you are fortunate. Another thought is perhaps two riders would have more conflicts about horse matters. Be grateful for the blessings you do have.
Yeah, I agree that being supportive of what you do is enough in a spouse, and that too much overlap can also lead to conflicts. I've never wished for my husband to take up riding, though he did get offered rides on my horses. Years ago I walked him cross-country on my Arab mare - he'd never ridden before! Because of his martial arts background and great posture, balance and flexibility he was a natural, but this is what he said to me: "It's all juddery...sort of like being drunk, without the euphoria." 😂

He expressed no further desire to ride and I respected that. We do so many things together, it's also good to have some separate pursuits. But I did talk him back onto a horse once more, when he came home with a Nazgul costume for Halloween - you can't be a Nazgul without a horse, and I needed a photo! You probably saw that one on my journal. 😄

I sort of see a good spouse relationship as being like a Venn diagram, with overlapping and non-overlapping areas. It's really important that your core values overlap, and very helpful if your general life aims do as well. Hobbies and interests, it's great to share some and the passion for them too, and to spend time doing those together, and also just sitting and talking! Which is where the non-overlapping stuff comes in, because that is how you can extend each other, and not run out of super conversations - especially if you're both continuously self-educating. I love how Brett extends me and teaches me things, and vice versa. So we're continually feeding off each other that way too, and it never gets boring, and helps you grow as a person.

Some of the non-overlapping stuff is of less interest to each other, but that's fine too, and makes things a bit mysterious! :)
 

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That sign! :ROFLMAO:


What to do? I get bummed out about not being able to explore and ride different places because it is snowy,muddy,wet and cold. Hunting season limits my range.So, I am reading @Knave 's journal and I see knave dragging a rope behind Queen and a light bulb goes off! Bam!
Is it just me, or did anyone else think you were going to rope the pony for practice?

...possibly that's even what you were implying in your entry, with that photo? Haha... ;)
 

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I'm reading your journal because it's a cold windy day and Brett is still unwell... and I don't want to make a post forest here because catching up, so this will be the last for this session, and I will edit it if there is anything else that comes up reading, and add it to this post. 🙃

About when Maya was eating manure. Technical term: Coprophagy. Very good reasons to do it and only a problem when there's parasites that can be transferred, which is not the general case with carnivores and herbivore manure - but I don't like that Jess has a habit of eating fox scats, and have to worm her for hydatids every month. While just a tapeworm in dogs/foxes, if a herbivore or a human ingests the worm eggs by accident they can end up with hydatidosis - a cancer-like condition from larvae which burrow through the gut, get into the circulation and form large cysts in the muscles and organs. Very hard to treat as often missed until it's a huge issue. Dogs can also pick up the to-them-merely-intestinal parasite from eating infected herbivore meat and organs.

You don't need to worry about dogs eating herbivore manure - they do it for gut health, and extra vegetable matter. In nature carnivores eat some of the gut contents of their kills, plus herbivore manure. You will know about the importance of gut microflora in humans - this is the same for other animals. Dogs eating horse or cow manure is like you eating yoghurt or fermented foods.

Young animals in particular need to establish good gut microflora - so are particularly interested in eating the right kinds of manure. Foals will eat their adult herdmates' manure to get the right cultures for processing cellulose etc when they start grazing. Also a good gut microflora prevents a lot of gut infections, like having a good skin microflora prevents many skin infections as good bugs keep pathogens at bay. Did you know non-breastfed infants have more skin and gut problems? You're meant to get good bacteria off you mum's skin to, not just the milk! :)

Editing to add already...

Bareback riding. Yes, yes, yes! Loved your observations, both on the extra connection with the horse and the great workout for core, balance, general independent seat. This really improves you as a rider and communicator with horses in so many many ways. Good for you and good for your relationship with your horse.

Next edit:

Wonderful background story. From mechanical to life...love how you just hung out with horses. Chatted with them. You see, many people I've come across seem to treat horses like motorbikes - things to ride and put in the shed after. Get upset if they don't move push-button. Talk about respect and don't know what it means, and that you're supposed to have it, not go around demanding it from others like you're entitled to the service of your fellow-creatures. A lot of ugly psychology. A lot of projection and ignorance. A lot of anthropomorphising. A lot of "love" that is just dysfunction - a lot of "I love icecream, I love what you can do for me" misnamed as love. Narcissism isn't love. Projection of fantasy isn't love. Using others isn't love. Kicking a horse that doesn't want to go around the arena with you isn't love - I saw someone describe it as such on the main board recently and called them on it - it's the kind of thing abusive parents call love, but is harmful and corrosive and causes great pain and harm to those unlucky enough to be dependent on you, like young children or animals.

I saw too much of that on the main board here as well, including from various moderators. And it makes me sick to the stomach. When I say what I think there, it's rarely left to stand, so like some others on the journal group I tend to ignore such stuff on the main forum and stick to people I like and post mainly on friendly journals where I am welcome and don't have to wince at how people, animals and the planet itself are talked about and treated.

You talk about being trained by mares. I grew up an emotional orphan and was mothered by a kind mare who'd had foals and saw the vacuum in me, between ages 10 and 13. And then she died, because of my parents' values, their big dreams of having a champion racehorse, their failure to take veterinary advice, and I sat on the ground with her head in my lap as she bled out. It nearly broke me, and I had nobody to comfort me. But she'd taught me well, about how to treat animals - I never forgot it. I will see each and every story about animals from the perspective she taught me. I understand what you mean when you say you are trained by mares.

And I really appreciate that a person who grew up with mechanical transport as a passion understands what some so-called horse people (who our farrier friend Greg refers to as "horse dabblers" - he thinks real horsepeople are rare, even amongst those professionally involved with horses) just do not understand: that a horse is not glorified motorised transport, and not your underling, and not your ego extension, but a sentient being of great depth and perception who can teach you things you will not learn from our own species - and that you need to come at it with egalitarianism and reverence and respect, and nothing less.

A horse is not hollow. Yet many humans are hollow.
 

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Discussion Starter · #426 ·
Lesson Day!

Great day! High 80's and humidity make for a very sticky day. My lesson was late afternoon so heat of the day. I was anxious to show Trainer lady that we could easily lope circles so we warmed up with some trotting and loped a few circles for practice. Wow! Felt great! Sunshine, blue sky and easy loping circles in the sandy arena!

So Trainer lady arrives a little late and I say watch this and I go lope with Nicki. No real issues just some easy loping around the arena. I felt relaxed , balanced and confident. There was even a tarp loose in the arena and once in a while a little hot breeze would make it flutter but we didn't care. Everything was just feeling right.

So we did some serpentines and some circles and we rode past a cross-rail jump. Trainer lady says have Nicki and I ever jumped and I replied over a ground pole but nothing more. So we are riding some more and Trainer lady says hey you are stiff, you need to loosen up and I said yeah because you mentioned that jump, now I tightened up! lol

So, Trainer lady walks over and sets the cross-rails up and she says we are jumping. I'm going to be pushed out of my comfort zone. Oh for pete's sake! It was going great and now this!
Well, long story short... we jumped! We began at the trot and then we loped the jump! Now Nicki and I can jump! To be sure, I still need to practice...alot! But we did it!

I felt this was the best lesson that I ever rode in. I seem to be loosening up in the saddle and Nicki and I are having fun. I feel like Nicki and I could do anything, go anywhere.I have to translate this to Jesse. Isn't it the best thing in the world when a horse and a person can learn to work as a team?

No pictures! Sorry! Nicki and I were both saturated with sweat. This is nothing new, before I left for the lesson I was saturated because I was working outside. I could really do without the humidity!
 

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That is so awesome! I’m so happy for you! Jumping feels like flying I think. I haven’t jumped Queen over anything yet. To be honest I’m a little scared to yet, because I know how much power she must have in a jump.
 

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Let me second that for Julian, @Knave. Sunsmart was a good jumper and happy to do logs and ditches, but when I resume with Julian I'm going to need to do some other basic stuff before we can start to jump...

Soon you'll be jumping bareback, @TrainedByMares. But you will have to be extra careful with that compared to us girls, especially if your horse has a high wither...
 

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Discussion Starter · #429 ·
Let me second that for Julian, @Knave. Sunsmart was a good jumper and happy to do logs and ditches, but when I resume with Julian I'm going to need to do some other basic stuff before we can start to jump...

Soon you'll be jumping bareback, @TrainedByMares. But you will have to be extra careful with that compared to us girls, especially if your horse has a high wither...
That will really be out of my comfort zone! lol
 

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@TrainedByMares, years ago someone on a social thread here posted a YT clip of a French professional show jumper who had lost a bet with someone and jumped a whole round of the official course bareback and in his birthday suit, after hours when the public weren't in the stands. It was pulled from the thread because apparently offending PG standards but was quite decorous and you couldn't see his wedding tackle, just his well-toned behind but above everything, a really wonderful display of horsemanship - boy were they excellent! It's still up on YT and so is this...


You might enjoy Alycia's YT channel, she's great at communicating with her animals and excellent fun.
 

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Discussion Starter · #431 ·
@SueC Alycia's videos are inspiring. Another one of her videos had her riding bareback with no reins! The slow-motion jumping shots really show the form well. Up in the two-point and bending forward at the waist over the jump. I will have to ride bareback more. I have been avoiding it because it gives my thighs such a workout!
 

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I am a HUGE Alycia Burton fan! I got to camp out with her at The Oaks in Lake City, FL. Also got to trail ride with her and hang out one evening. Her show is spectacular. She doesn't do those huge jumps at her shows because Gold Dust has only so many jumps in him. She can't do that every couple of nights. But it was still a great show and she is a wonderful motivational speaker. But the best part is that she is so down to earth and fun to be around.
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She is demonstrating a cued rear in this picture, not jumping. The jump is just in the way of the photo.
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This is Alycia heading out to trail ride with us on the camping trip. No saddle, no bridle. She said that Gold Dust is actually a difficult horse to ride tackless. There are many horses who are more suited to it. But Gold Dust was what she had, so she trained him to do it. She had another young horse coming along that she thought would be better suited for what she does. But he isn't (or wasn't then) ready yet.

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Our trail ride with Alycia Burton. She is the rider in red. The horse ears in the photo is my Chorro. I bought the tee shirt! I only wash it by hand because the lettering is gold, and I want it to last and last and last!

Sorry I bragged so much about Alycia Burton, but I am just so excited about her. She is such a cool person.
 

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Ooooh how fantastic, @knightrider! :love::love:

What wonderful photos - and thanks for all the reporting! 🌞🌛⭐🌟✨💫

Isn't it funny how people who are lovely to animals and would never dream of getting uppity or taking out a temper on them do so much better than others with what they can do together with their animals - and how they are also lovely to people and never from up here to you down there like some of the other people going around doing clinics etc!
 

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This is one of many reasons people love endurance! On the endurance FB pages, people wanting to try it often post questions about what tack they need, what clothes they need, etc. The answer is always that there are no rules about any of that- you should use what is safe and well-fitting for you and your horse, and a ride would welcome you if you wanted to show up bareback and naked, as long as your horse was fit and sound 🤣
Years ago I translated an article about an alternative German riding school which had exactly this kind of commonsense approach and boy did it rile the "football teams"! Also the back story of the person behind it. Some of you might find that an interesting read - lots of great photos too.


I love the way this school teaches newbies and treats their horses, and have adopted much of their philosophy when I'm working with beginner riders. When the wide smile is on their faces and my horse's I know we're doing good things! :love:


...very ticklish horse who had to be brushed just right, and first-timer getting it spot on! :)
If there's no joy in it for both sides, you may as well forget it.
 

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I ate a mouthful of foxtail over a year ago to see what effect it had. Nasty! Instant sore throat that lasted 24 hours and my lips and gums felt puffy and numb.
I think there are two scientists you should know about. One is an Aussie who studies mosquitoes. He keeps them in vials and at feeding time he inverts the vial over his own skin.

I don't know what nationality the other is, but he arranges various insect bites on a pain scale and it's quite fun reading his reports. He sounds a bit like a professional wine taster! :D
 

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Discussion Starter · #436 ·
I think there are two scientists you should know about. One is an Aussie who studies mosquitoes. He keeps them in vials and at feeding time he inverts the vial over his own skin.

I don't know what nationality the other is, but he arranges various insect bites on a pain scale and it's quite fun reading his reports. He sounds a bit like a professional wine taster! :D
Haha! It's always feeding time for the flies and mosquitoes around here! Lol
 

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Well, and you run around in shorts a lot! When we were building our house our carpenter Chris was the same. The March flies were out and his legs were covered in little drops of blood from the puncture wounds. :eek: They seemed to find him especially tasty but with Chris we don't even know if he owns long pants, we've never seen him in any summer or winter, although surely he must have at least rented some when he got married 30 years earlier.

Speaking of carpentry, is the rot in the old part of the house or the extension? What sort of rot is it - do you have a fungus? Here in Australia, the commonest cause of structural timber disintegration is termites. They got in my parents' roof but they noticed before major damage occurred, and fixed the situation by spraying around nasty organochlorines which also leached into the living space - once they get into you, by contact or breathing fumes or dust or eating contaminated food, they concentrate in the body fat and are with you for life. Our neighbours here spent 30 years living in a DIY machinery shed add-on, and just as they were looking into building an actual house, their add-on caved in from termite infestation of untreated pine.

We used copper/chrome/arsenic treated pine for our house frame - a lesser evil than spraying around persistent organic chemicals - and have a step-up slab whose exposed edges we check regularly for termite galleries, plus Termimesh around plumbing openings. No interest so far even though there are termite nests within 20 metres in the bushland, plus when they swarm we get clouds of them even around our windows!

We also get wood borers in Australia.

How much of your timber is affected? Are you using one of those thingummyjigs that spots internal timber disintegration and replacing the affected pieces? Is it widespread? I am really sorry this is happening. It's such a lovely-looking old house and I can't imagine many things more stressful than dealing with something like this, let alone time-consuming. :(
 

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Discussion Starter · #438 ·
Well, and you run around in shorts a lot! When we were building our house our carpenter Chris was the same. The March flies were out and his legs were covered in little drops of blood from the puncture wounds. :eek: They seemed to find him especially tasty but with Chris we don't even know if he owns long pants, we've never seen him in any summer or winter, although surely he must have at least rented some when he got married 30 years earlier.

Speaking of carpentry, is the rot in the old part of the house or the extension? What sort of rot is it - do you have a fungus? Here in Australia, the commonest cause of structural timber disintegration is termites. They got in my parents' roof but they noticed before major damage occurred, and fixed the situation by spraying around nasty organochlorines which also leached into the living space - once they get into you, by contact or breathing fumes or dust or eating contaminated food, they concentrate in the body fat and are with you for life. Our neighbours here spent 30 years living in a DIY machinery shed add-on, and just as they were looking into building an actual house, their add-on caved in from termite infestation of untreated pine.

We used copper/chrome/arsenic treated pine for our house frame - a lesser evil than spraying around persistent organic chemicals - and have a step-up slab whose exposed edges we check regularly for termite galleries, plus Termimesh around plumbing openings. No interest so far even though there are termite nests within 20 metres in the bushland, plus when they swarm we get clouds of them even around our windows!

We also get wood borers in Australia.

How much of your timber is affected? Are you using one of those thingummyjigs that spots internal timber disintegration and replacing the affected pieces? Is it widespread? I am really sorry this is happening. It's such a lovely-looking old house and I can't imagine many things more stressful than dealing with something like this, let alone time-consuming. :(
You are right, it is stressful! It is widespread throughout the addition. The original farmhouse is in good condition. It is really disappointing because the addition was touted as the nicest part of the living space. Likely, it started leaking water right after it was built. So, search out the rot and black mold spots, cut it out and rebuild. The window and siding crew was here all last week and we worked together to get alot of it done in areas that they were working in. However, there is still a significant amount of it left to do and this week it is all mine.

I never did like the trim or the color scheme in the addition anyway , so now it's time to put my touch on the place.
 

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I am so glad to hear that the old part of the house is unaffected! I'm assuming that's the major part of the house? And historically it's the heart of it. I know having structural problems in an addition is bad enough, but imagine if it was the other way around. Like you bought a castle and a car garage, and the castle falls apart and you have to go live in the garage. I know that's a bit exaggerated, but I'd prefer it if the garage fell apart and my castle was OK.

By the way you're not the only one here with shaggy orange carpet and other such appalling things - @egrogan had some really "interesting" wallpaper at her house...

I bet when you finish with your repairs/renovation, it will be better than before!
 

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Discussion Starter · #440 ·
I am so glad to hear that the old part of the house is unaffected! I'm assuming that's the major part of the house? And historically it's the heart of it. I know having structural problems in an addition is bad enough, but imagine if it was the other way around. Like you bought a castle and a car garage, and the castle falls apart and you have to go live in the garage. I know that's a bit exaggerated, but I'd prefer it if the garage fell apart and my castle was OK.

By the way you're not the only one here with shaggy orange carpet and other such appalling things - @egrogan had some really "interesting" wallpaper at her house...

I bet when you finish with your repairs/renovation, it will be better than before!
I've grown quite attached to my orange carpet! Lol
 
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