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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Pony has had something in one of his hooves for the past several days. The farrier came yesterday and said it was not quite thrush. Like, yes it had a bit of a smell and there was some black stuff, but it wasn't really that bad. Her go-to for everything, apparently, is Coppertox. She put some in there and told me to apply some more about twice a week.

I think that Coppertox has its uses, but it seems maybe a little like overkill in this case. What do you guys think? I'm happy to hear that I'm wrong and that I should keep using it, because honestly I already have it on hand. What would you use on something that is "not quite thrush"?

Thanks!
 

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Well that would be one farrier I would forget to reschedule with:). As WildestDandelion said there is no such thing as "not quite thrush".

You're dealing with thrush in its early stages, those bacteria & fungi reproduce like wildfire.

I am not a fan of Koppertox simply because it has never done its job. Since you have some, try it.

Keep the hooves picked out AND brush the soles/frogs every day. Use the Koppertox every 2-3 days on any hoof that is the slightest bit smelly.

If you don't see progress after ten days, buy a 2oz bottle of Thrush Buster at TSC or any feed store and see if that helps.

Whatever you do, don't let some fool try to coax you into using Clorox. Clorox burns like heck and also destroys healthy flesh. No Lysol either.

Also keep an on the central sulci <--- the crack between the heel bulbs. There shouldn't be a crack -- if there is pour some Thrush Buster in there.

If you still have trouble clearing the thrush up, there's a plethora of other products you can try:)
 

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Like others formerly posted, there is no such thing as 'not quite thrush', but rather thrush in the earlier stages. It is either thrush or not. I have never used the product Coppertox, but I do have a recommendation for thrush. It is a product called Thrush Buster (I think it is a purple color). It helps really well for preventing and treating thrush. I once had a Quarter Horse who had mild thrush, and when I used Thrush Buster it healed up nice and quick. When caught in its earlier stages, thrush will not be permanently damaging to your horse. But if not caught soon enough when it becomes more severe, it can cause your horse to become lame. Throughout the later stages of thrush, it is painful in the hooves for your horse (when your horse fist gets it not so much). The best way to prevent thrush though is to pick your horses hoves at least every other day, and make sure your horse has a dry and clean area to stay out of standing water and mud.
Best of luck!
 

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Yeah you can have 'not quite thrush'... just like you can have ' not quite pregnant' :lol:

Coppertox doesn't always work on thrush(depends if fungal, what bugs...) & can be too harsh(like many other options) if thrush is deep or near hairline.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Alright, thanks everyone. I went ahead and ordered Thrush Buster. It will get here in the next two days. When I go out tomorrow, I'll apply the Coppertox since it's what I have.

I am religious about picking out my horses' hooves. Every time I bring them in, which is several times a week, I pick everyone's hooves, regardless of whether I'm riding or not. I've never had a problem with thrush before, but they are overstocked in their pasture (I board and can't control that) and the barn owner doesn't believe that poop picking is necessary. I used to have them in a pasture by themselves, and I picked out that pasture twice a week, but that's not going to happen where they are now, unfortunately.
 
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Thrushbuster is amazing stuff! I also am a bit ott - I use warm water to thoroughly wash out her feet. Then I have two buckets, one full of warm sea salt water mix and pour enough into the empty for one foot. Scrub it in with a medium stiff brush. Occasionally dunk the whole foot. I repeat for each foot so fresh bucket... Thrush buster after and dry bedding. She spends 3-4 days on a row out in horrible wet, knee high clay mud. And then 3-4 days in - I try do it on the day she's brought in. So far so good only have issues with one back foot that gets a bit smelly sometimes. Haven't needed to go as far as a proper soak but with how good mine is I've been wondering if a salt soak every other day would be enough. Have found that with a lot of things simple and consistent is sometimes better than overdoing it with chemicals... but thrush buster. Really great stuff man...
 

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I too use Thrush Buster when appropriate of a issue and when wet, dirty conditions are present and want to do preventative treatment.
So, it is purple and it stains anything it touches...including us humans!
You will see the purple color and residue on the hoof material...
Thrush Buster kills the organisms that create problems but does not kill healthy, good tissue like many other products do.

When its color fades is when you retreat...
As long as you can see the staining the formula is working... :smile:
Not seen, reapply.
Seen, working still, save your money....
:runninghorse2:...
 

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My take is that Coppertox is a bit too harsh.

I like plain on zinc oxide cream on a hoof that looks like it might get thrushy. For anything more significant, I use No Thrush powder. But I don't have to deal with any severe thrush so I don't have opinions on that.

I think the purple in Thrush Buster (gentian violet?) is a carcinogen so you should wear gloves when applying it. Though I imagine you'd have to be exposed quite a lot to put yourself at risk. Still, it has been taken off the shelves here.
 

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I tried everything under the sun for my horse’s thrush. The thing that has worked best for me is a mixture of triple antibiotic cream, clotrimazole (athlete's foot cream), and zinc oxide (diaper rash cream). It sounds weird, but it was recommended by my farrier and it is the only thing that has helped her central sulcis cracks open up and heal. I apply a pea-sized amount in each hoof with a paintbrush to get into the cracks.
 

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My farrier turned me on to this stuff:

Today
Boehringer Ingelheim
Uses cephapirin sodium to treat susceptible gram-positive and gram-negative organisms, including penicillin-resistant Strep agalactiae and Staph aureus

It comes in a plastic syringe and you can inject it into the hoof sulcus from the back until it squirts out the front. Even though it is formulated to treat mastitis in dairy cows it will also knock down thrush. If the hoof has soggy, black patches that STINK, it IS thrush. Keep the horse out of the mud for at least half a day every day. If this means building a mound of straw or shavings, do it. If they stand in mud 24/7 they will almost always get thrush.
 

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A little bit thrush is like a little bit pregnant. Either there's a thrush infection or there isn't. It just isn't horrible or laming the horse yet. I prefer Thrush Buster, once every 7 days, for mild infections and Tomorrow for deep sulcus thrush. Obviously, keep his feet dry and picked out daily.
 
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