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So I see that beet pulp and oats is a hot topic in magazines and online. I have fed beet pulp before, but switched barns so I discontinued. My horse is now fed Nutrena Stock and Stable I'm not sure what the ingredients are yet, have to check it out at the barn.
What are your personal experiences with feeding just oats or just beet pulp. Have you mixed them together, with other feeds, etc? Just curious what others thoughts are, this is not my expertise area. Thanks!
 

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They're two quite different feeds nutritionally so I don't see them as an 'either or' option
If I was to just choose one it would be beet pulp because its a safer form of energy and weight gain (the no added molasses type) and good for extra hydration
I do feed oats but along with other things and not on their own, I sometimes (according to need) feed crimped oats that have been soaked and cooked for 4 hours in a slow cooker which makes them more digestible and reduces the starch overload risks
 

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ok, I was kind of thinking that. My horse does get a vitamin/mineral supplement. Do you prefer beet pulp over commercial grains such as nutrena? I'm always iffy on them just because of all the processing in factories and stuff that may be in there that is unnecessary.
 

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Look what's in the ingredients and then decide if it looks like value for money. Most of the pelleted complete feeds are beet pulp based now, I avoid any that contain molasses unless I only feed a small amount such as for a handful in the manger when they come in from the field
I use Triple Crown Safe Starch forage as a base feed and then add alfalfa pellets & beet pulp to that plus the cooked oats when the weather's cold or they're in hard work
 

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Stock and Stable is their 'lowest price' option, they have 8 versions of it, so you'll definitely want to go through the list and see what's in it.

I'm a fan of both oats and beet pulp, I like barley also, but it's pretty well impossible to get in my location, so I've found. I like whole oats, the horses I've seen on them digest them just fine. people freak out if they see oats in the manure, but not many are willing to actually pluck them out and see if it's just the husk or the whole oat. I have and it was always the husk, but the horses eating them were younger with good teeth and they didn't bolt their feed either.
I like the idea of cooking some oats for the horses though, might try that once I find a new horse. :)

As Jaydee said, see if it's really a good value for the money.
 

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ok, I was kind of thinking that. My horse does get a vitamin/mineral supplement. Do you prefer beet pulp over commercial grains such as nutrena? I'm always iffy on them just because of all the processing in factories and stuff that may be in there that is unnecessary.
I see this again as very different feeds and not an either-or situation. Beet pulp is not nutritionally balanced on its own and won't provide the vitamins or minerals that you would get in a commercially formulated feed. You can create your own balanced feeding routine, but it requires a very good understanding of equine nutrition and an analysis of the hay or pasture the horse is eating.

When picking a feed, it's important to pick one that you can feed at the recommended rate (so they're getting the proper levels of nutrition) without overfeeding your horse. Often times the recommended amount is 5+ pounds per day, which would be way too much for many horses. The opposite situation is not nearly so problematic: if you're feeding something like a ration balancer which recommends only 1 pound per day, but your horse is not holding weight on a smaller ration, you can easily add beet pulp (or rice bran, or flax seed, or alfalfa, etc.) to add more calories.
 

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beet pulp (soaked) is given as a supplement to other feed. i use it with sr feed and hay for my old horses. i dont feed oats simply because my old horses cannot chew them good enough. i would get a cracked oat, it digest in the fore gut instead of the hind gut , so do not feed large amounts at one time. But you should not feed all the supplement in one large feeding.
 

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Boiling oats and barley is a really old fashioned British thing for getting condition on show horses/ponies or anything that needs some weight gain or is working hard. They used to add boiled linseed (flax seed) to that to get a lovely shine to the coat. Its very digestible and you don't seem to get the 'fizz' or the digestive upsets you sometimes see from feeding straight
 

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Boiling oats and barley is a really old fashioned British thing for getting condition on show horses/ponies or anything that needs some weight gain or is working hard. They used to add boiled linseed (flax seed) to that to get a lovely shine to the coat. Its very digestible and you don't seem to get the 'fizz' or the digestive upsets you sometimes see from feeding straight[/QUOTe

Yes, the working hard, and no metabolic conditions, would need to be a component of feeding lots of hot calories, as that oat and barley combo
The flax would add cool calories
I don't buy pre mixed bags of feed, but instead, feed my horses as individuals, and knowing what constitutes a concentrated fiber, energy or protein feed, along with balanced minerals in the right amount
 

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Boiling oats and barley is a really old fashioned British thing for getting condition on show horses/ponies or anything that needs some weight gain or is working hard. They used to add boiled linseed (flax seed) to that to get a lovely shine to the coat. Its very digestible and you don't seem to get the 'fizz' or the digestive upsets you sometimes see from feeding straight
I can remember getting books as a kid, most of them were written in the UK and I had a hard time figuring out some of the 'translations' and why people didn't seem to feed or do things like in the books. Took me forever to figure out the feed thing.
I do like the idea of cooking for the horses, maybe add a carrot or apple to the feed, and I liked the idea of boiled linseed (also took me forever to figure out why we didn't have 'linseed' over here..because we call it flax, I was five or six, how was I supposed to know? LOL)


I have noticed an upswing as of late with people making 'homemade' or all-natural/ organic type rations where they can see the ingredients.
 
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I don't know about cooking apples or carrots!!!
We used to buy big bags (nets) of carrots really cheaply from our feed store in the UK and slice them up every day but I've never seen them sold like that here
My Grandmother was always telling me how they used to cook potato's for the horses in the war because grain was scarce
Boiling linseed (flaxseed) I wouldn't do now you can buy it as an oil. Since you can grind it I'm not sure why it was boiled it unless it was more digestible that way, it was always told to me that linseed had to be boiled really well to remove the risks of hydrogen cyanide poisoning but it seems that this has now been found to not cause a problem but it still shouldn't be soaked before feeding
I was really pleased to see that people do still feed like this in the UK and that you can buy purpose made boilers for the job
Recipes « Farvis Boilers Ltd
 
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