The Horse Forum banner
Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
281 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So Charlie has always had this "quirk". He walks fine and for some reason sometimes bobs his head up and down but when asked to trot he basically hops really big into the air to start trotting... this is weird it always feels like he got spooked.. any ideas?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,950 Posts
Could be his conformation and/or lack of balance. It could also be the rider. Are you lifting your hands or kicking him hard to get him to trot? Is your horse half asleep at the walk and then you suddenly kick him to get him to trot?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
67 Posts
Based on the description, it sounds like what my horse does when he's feeling ****y and uncooperative. Does he toss his head around a bit at the same time? That's a similar sign, with my horse. Usually I take it as a sign that he's been a bit underworked and/or has forgotten who's in charge and needs a bit of leadership - sometimes just persisting will get him to settle down, but sometimes a bit of groundwork to remind him who's in charge is needed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17,077 Posts
Could be he's really pushing from his hind to start trotting. Have you worked on walk to trot and trot to walk transitions (like every 4 strides) with him?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
281 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Based on the description, it sounds like what my horse does when he's feeling ****y and uncooperative. Does he toss his head around a bit at the same time? That's a similar sign, with my horse. Usually I take it as a sign that he's been a bit underworked and/or has forgotten who's in charge and needs a bit of leadership - sometimes just persisting will get him to settle down, but sometimes a bit of groundwork to remind him who's in charge is needed.
YES! That's exactly what he does! So I should work on walking then transition to trot then walk again and work on that? How do I get him to start moving not from his back end?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17,077 Posts
YES! That's exactly what he does! So I should work on walking then transition to trot then walk again and work on that? How do I get him to start moving not from his back end?
You want him to use his back end.... that's where a horse's power comes from.

Tossing the head could also mean that you aren't moving WITH the horse during the transition.. you could be bracing or holding him back.

For how long have you ridden horses?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
67 Posts
YES! That's exactly what he does! So I should work on walking then transition to trot then walk again and work on that?
Well, I'm no expert on these matters, but with my horse, doing a bunch of transitions does sometimes help focus his attention, especially if it's happening early in a session. It's Dubbin's way of saying "I don't wanna, and you can't make me!" If he continues doing it after a bit of work and/or shows other signs of general disobedience, I sometimes find that simply making a point of holding a crop while riding him can be enough to persuade him to settle down. I rarely need to use it, but he knows what it means - "shut up and listen, she's serious!" He also recognises a short throaty growl noise as meaning "behave, dammit!" and will often respond to that. And if neither of those do the trick, it may well be that persistence helps - just keeping on asking him to do stuff, a heel in the ribs or a growl if he misbehaves, and an enthusiastic "good boy!" if he does it right. If all else fails, dismounting and spending a good half hour or more doing groundwork exercises will usually put him in a more cooperative frame of mind, particularly if it's stuff he has to really think about - learning a new trick, or maybe some desensitisation work for something he finds a bit challenging. It gets him focussed on something other than "I don't wanna!", and eventually he forgets to be ****y and disobedient. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
281 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
You want him to use his back end.... that's where a horse's power comes from.

Tossing the head could also mean that you aren't moving WITH the horse during the transition.. you could be bracing or holding him back.

For how long have you ridden horses?
I have been riding since I was 4. I am 22 now. However Charlie is the only horse I have ever ridden that has done this!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
49,728 Posts
Based on the description, it sounds like what my horse does when he's feeling ****y and uncooperative. Does he toss his head around a bit at the same time? That's a similar sign, with my horse. Usually I take it as a sign that he's been a bit underworked and/or has forgotten who's in charge and needs a bit of leadership - sometimes just persisting will get him to settle down, but sometimes a bit of groundwork to remind him who's in charge is needed.

If he is chucking his head down, while his front comes up, he is using the weight of his head to lift his shoulders. This is not a sign of pushging from the hind end, but jsut the opposite; it is of a horse that pulls more with his shoulders. this is his push off, but he needs the leverage of his head going down in order to lift his shoulders.

next time you you go up a hill, pay attention to how he does it. you will be able to feel if he is pulling more with his shoulders than pushing with his hind, he will really need the head movement to help him, especially if you ask him to go a bit faster.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
54 Posts
I'm not so sure that this is always a cranky "you cant make me" thing.

My Standardbred always does this big leap into the air to get into a trot, the first few times I thought he was about to take off or start bucking. But then he trots on quite happily.
He does it every time, on the lunge as well and even in his paddock when he wants to trot of his own accord!
He raced as a pacer not a trotter, its like he's having trouble working out which gait to use or trying to get his balance.

Reading what tinyliny wrote...
"If he is chucking his head down, while his front comes up, he is using the weight of his head to lift his shoulders. This is not a sign of pushing from the hind end, but just the opposite; it is of a horse that pulls more with his shoulders. this is his push off, but he needs the leverage of his head going down in order to lift his shoulders." Im gonna watch closely next time to see if that's what he 's doing..
I'm would suspect its something to do with racing in harness for years..for my boy anyway.
Not sure how you teach them to push from the hind though...oh well, another thing to work on!
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top