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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok so my tennessee walker that I got a couple months ago I was told he was 18. Well the previous owner had his paperwork in another state. So today I get it and OMG he is 27 years old. Granted he seems to be in great condition he was severely obese and was put on a diet, and ridden etc and now is in great shape he is always the one who leads trail rides and we have to wait on all the younger horses.He loves it but now that I know his true age, What do I do now should he just be retired?or what I have never had a horse this old what should I look for?Thanks in advance
 

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Well if he loves it I don't think there is any real reason to stop. Unless he's in some sort of pain.
Although, I could be wrong lol.
 

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Since it doesn't sound like you want to send him back due to being misrepresented and if he is in good shape and still going strong - keep him doing what he is doing. Just watch for soreness issues (joints and such) and you might want to get his teeth checked by a vet to make sure he can eat properly. You might need to consider in the near future putting him on equine senior if he is not on it already - but that depends on how he holds weight and his teeth.

Usually if an older horse is kept in light work they actually age much better than if they are retired. There is a 37 year old horse still doing endurance! His name is Elmer Bandit. Google him & you will find lots of articles.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
He doesn't seem to be in any type of pain I haven't heard any bones or joints cracking lol but would you recommend some type of joint supplements I actually have the vet scheduled to come out in a couple weeks already so I guess a good overall exam is in order!Should I ride him less than I have been I honestly have been riding the living heck out of him every chance I get. ( not cantering or super hard ) but we have been doing a LOT of trail riding do you think I should maybe just ride him like I have been unless I notice something?

Thanks Cat I will do just that No he isn't on senior feed but I had already considered it thinking he was 18 just to ensure his weight stayed up.If you find my old post what color goes good on a palomino there are pics of him. take a look and tell me what you think.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
yeah we go trailriding a couple times a week though is that too much?
 

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As long as he isn't in pain you aren't doing him any harm. In fact you're doing him good as activity is good. As others have said just keep an eye out of pain and stiffness. If you feel that you need to put him on some sort of supplement I would suggest pure MSM or if you need something with more oomph to it go with Cosequin.
 

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Let his condition and attitude be your guide. He will let you know if he is starting to slow down by his attitude and energy levels.


I had an appaloosa when I was growing up. I got him when he was 17, and I was 11. I showed him all through school, and half way through high school. I gamed him, jumped him, showed in every class. He lived to be 36 years old, and I fully quit riding him at 32, just because I thought he deserved to be a very well taken care of companion.

Let your horse tell you...
 

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I just looked up those photos - He looks really good & at a good weight! As long as you are not seeing any pain issues and he maintains his weight - keep doing what you are doing. If you see any problems, then adjust things as necessary.

Right now I think trail riding a couple times a week is fine. It really looks like he was well-cared for through his life & you could have several more good years of riding from him still. Some horses are going strong well into their 30s.

I don't know much on joint supplements, so hopefully someone can come by and help on that. I think putting him on one as a preventative would have some benefits considering his age.
 

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The best thing for any horse is walk and lots of it. As long as you aren't doing anything too strenuous like a lot of trotting or cantering, or trail riding over very rough terrain and poor footing the exercise is good for him!
I would be careful about his joints - popping and cracking is a poor indicator of joint health, what you need to be looking for is swelling. All of his joints should be basically "tight" and slightly bony feeling, there will be areas of softer tissue, but what you're watching out for is "cushy" fluid filled sacks.
I would talk to your vet about Adequan and possibly Legend. I rave about these products all the time, but they are the only clinically proven way to treat and prevent joint disease. If you get the generic form injected by a vet, both injections and the vet cost shouldn't even be $100 a month. I pay $60 Canadian.

Good luck!
 

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just keep doing what you are doing. you can do as much as you like with him as long as he is in no pain! HE will let YOU know when he can no longer do something. He will jsut refuse. if he can be riden anymore, he wont let you saddle him up, he will make a huge fuss of it. just watch for aches and pains but i see no reason why you should reduce his activity if he loves it! many horses can be riden into their 30s with no problems at all! have you had a vet check? if so and it was all good, i wouldnt change a thing! if not it doesnt really matter, you just have to look out for signs of discomfort! my horse is 24 and i can still do anything with him! I ride him nearly every day and i still go for full day rides when i get a chance! he loves it and there are no problems!
 

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I don't see any reason to retire a horse as long as he's happy in his work and is comfortable. There's a 30-something-year-old mare at my barn who's still in great shape and giving lessons. I would just be careful and watch for signs that he's not feeling well or is in pain. It depends on how he's been taken care of for the past twenty+ years. As long as he's happy, I think you're good to go.

My trainer barrel raced her Thoroughbred well into his 20's because she kept him in top condition all throughout his life. Old horses will be in much better shape and functional for a longer time if you keep them conditioned all their lives.
 

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If I were you, unless he shows bad signs, don't stop riding him! His age doesn't matter, it's more of his health. I mean, a horse could be 10 and have joint problems, and a horse could be 30 and be fit as a fiddle.
We have a 38 year old horse once- he was actually the fastest pony we ever had. He died because of lameness but it wasn't really his age- he just ran too much.. lol.
 

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I second Anebel's opnion on Adaquen, it is a great product, and is easy to give once you get used to it. (have your vet show you how first! it is an IM injection)
 

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We have got a 30 year old TWH still going on heavy duty trails. Just remember his age and be considerate when riding him, but otherwise, he seems like he is fine to me.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Thank you all I have been still riding him just like normal and with warm weather he is feeling better than ever. I did switch him to a senior feed just to ensure he is getting everything he needs.again thanks for the advice.
 
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