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My horse has equine Uveitis and her left eye is slowly losing vision in it. Her other eye is perfectly fine as of now.

I want to hear from people that have experience with horses with just one eye or with moon blindness. Do you have to train them differently? Do they learn slower? Do you still show them?

Im so sad that she is losing sight in that eye :cry:
 

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Sorry to hear about your horse :cry:. We have a horse at our barn who recently got this too. I believe the owners are planning on selling him, though, he's also older and has had his time in the show ring. I don't know much about differences in training with horses that have lost sight in an eye, however, I often compete at local shows with a girl whose horse only has one eye and they do really well together quite frequently!
 

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The old mare I lost last year was partially sighted for 15 years after injuring her eye when she was 8. Apart from slightly tilting her head to one side I can't say that it made any of difference to her at all as a riding horse
One thing you do have to remember is if its just one eye affected that they can't see on that side and she did knock her head a couple of times on things when she was in the field and in the stable
 

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They is a lady at the barn that her horse lost an eye and she trail ride he the only problem is he has figure out if he turn the eye socket to people they give him treats and say poor boy he is loving it
 

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I'm sorry about your horse. I have been there. My 17 year old horse had a cancer growth form in his left eye two years ago. The eye had to be removed so all of the cancer could be taken out and to keep it from spreading. I never really saw any difference in his behavior. If anything, he actually got better. He always used to be spooky in the wind, and now he has no problem. We have had no problems riding, and he does better because now he has to really trust me to not lead him into a fence! The veterinarian said I could never ride him again...and now I'm using him for giving lessons. :)

I think it would really depend on the horse, but I've been around a few horses that are either blind in one eye or only have one eye and they have no problems getting around. My riding instructor used a almost blind horse for lessons for awhile and he was an angel! Good luck with your horse and I wish you the best.
 

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My daughter barrel raced a one eyed horse. She lost her eye at about 8 years old. Never bothered her at all, she was a heck of a barrel mare, raced until about 19.
 

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It seems many horses do well one eyed.

I was part of a terrible accident once that was caused by an one eyed horse. I have to but wonder if that horse didn't already have issues and then one eyed made them even worse. Who knows maybe the rider didn't help the situation any.
 

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I know of several one eyed horses that did fairly well. Most of them were older and basically retired, but a couple were still doing lessons and stuff.

The big thing is being aware of your horse's reduced vision. They (obviously) won't be able to see on that side and things can easily surprise them. As prey animals that can cause issues, but be aware of it and be patient.
 

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We have a friend whos horse has the exact same issue. The "good" thing is it happens slowly and they have time to adapt. Her mare seems to enjoy things as much as she ever did, she just takes a bit longer to cross trail obstacles than she did.
 

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i am sorry to hear about your mare. If she is slowly losing her sight, she is already learning how to function and I don't think there will be any difference in riding and training her. I worked with a boarder that had one eye and unless you noticed the empty socket you'd never know it by the way he got around. He did have a bad reputation (charging and attacking people in the paddock) so for the first week I never approached him from his blind side. By the second week he turned out to be an "in your pocket" kind of horse, so I don't know how he got the bad label but it had nothing to do with his eye.
 

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Sorry about your horse :(
I've ridden a horse with one eye quite a bit, even jumped her. To me, she felt exactly the same as any other horse, except that she would cut corners on her blind side. Other than that, she was good to ride, jumped the same as any other horse. This mare had a tumour in her eye, and had it removed, so had sight in both for some time.
I didn't try any more complex movements with her, but just for basic riding, if you hadn't been told she was missing an eye, you would not be able to tell.

And at a place I used to ride there was a horse missing an eye, similar situation to the other one I mentioned. She was used my the advanced riders, I never rode her, but was told she was the same as any other horse, you just had to be more careful about being around her blind side.
 
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You will want to talk to Wallaby.

Very limited personal experience but for a quiet well adapted horse most do just fine.
 

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I am sorry for your horse... I have a different story, in a way..
I saw a horse listed for sale, and he fell into my heart.. I then learnt, that he had lost his right eye.. It didn't stop me from purchasing this untrained 3 year old.

They told me, he lost the eye because a mare kicked at him.. possible.. so I believed it.

This autumn my vet who knows the place said it was more like.. the old owner beat him with a piece of wood or metal to make him behave (he was a stallion then) in a dark box...

I have since started riding him lightly and he is no different than other horses, because he listens to me. Sure, you can scare him if you suddenly show up of touch him on the blind side.. with warning, he knows what to expect.
On the lunge he turns his head to check on me, but otherwise.. he is a great horse and we hope to compete in dressage and maybe low level jumping, and maybe even driving.. who knows..

One eyed horses adjust quite well from what I have noticed (i have met and worked a little with another 3 (mare, gelding, stallion), so I have noticed different personalities..

Good luck and the best of wishes.
 

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I worried over my one-eyed mare, too, but my vet has a barrel horse with one eye and she does great. He recently lost a thumb in a horse accident. When I asked if I should worry about a one-eyed horse, he said, "Only if you'd worry about a one-thumbed vet." Haha!
Best of luck with your "pirate" horse! ;)
 

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My daughter rode a mare that was blind in one eye. Apart from turning her head to look at things on the blind side, the only other thing we had problems with that may have been due to her eye, was over-jumping. It might have just been that she was always an over-jumper (ie taking jump a LOT higher/wider than needed) but we think her depth perception was off due to only having on eye, so she just jumped big to make sure she could clear the jump.
It can also work to your advantage having one blind side, as you can come up on that side with things they may otherwise react to - wormers, height stick (never met a horse yet that doesn't give wild big eyes at the height stick!), vaccinations/injections, and you can be done before they realise the scary thing is there :D
 

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I don't know much about a one eyed horse but can speak from experience with my completely blind mare

The one thing I can say is you are lucky that your horse is going blind not losing its sight all of the sudden
Mine went blind as if you flipped out a switch it took time and rehab but she is perfect now

The only training we had to redo was ground work were you use to use body language now is a physical touch or vocal command

We also try very hard to keep her safe with the pasture being even and hazard free

I can't stress more the required trust it takes for the both of us to do every thing we do we trail ride compete in trail classes and most any other things we feel we want to even barrel race we currently are moving towards cutting which provides more challenge for us
As far as showing if you and your horse work as a team. You listen to your horses needs and don't over do there's no reason to say you can't do anything you set your mind to.

Now I will say the difference in trading may not be as drastic because your horse has one eye
Just remember that every horse is going to be different some cop with blindness better than others

Hotdog and I wish you and your horse the best :)
 

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I've worked teams where one horse was blind. Trust in the team mate and driver is paramount. Same goes for a riding horse. One of my horse's sire is totally blind. He has UvE in both eyes. They still use him to trail with and he's still the same ham around the barn. If you didn't know he was blind you'd never guess. We also have a horse that had an eye removed due to cancer. He's still worked the same. He spooks actually less now than before but that could be that he's older and settled now.
 

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I don't have any personal experience with one-eyed horses at all, but I do have experience with a one-eyed dog, as well as hearing what others have said about their one-eyed horses.
My grandparents, who house my horse (but not me, just to clear things up), have a dog named Patch who has only one eye. Our vet thinks he was born like that, but there's really no telling. He showed up with his eye already gone, as a stray, and my grandparents took him in. The vet decided we didn't need to have the eyelids stitched shut, since it was just the clean socket, and wasn't infected or anything of the sort, unless it bothered us, and it didn't.
Patch lives a perfectly normal life. The only thing that I have noticed about him that is different than other dogs is that he trots and runs sort of sideways. I think he does it so that the eye he has will be in the front where he can see well.
He runs and plays with his friends Otis and Bolt on a frequent basis, and has captured many squirrels and rabbits (I'm not proud of that, but that was to show you how well he adjusted).
Now I will tell you from what I've heard about horse owners with horses with one eye. I haven't heard of many one-eyed horses that couldn't be ridden anymore. I do imagine that they could suddenly go spooky, but I would think you could still show and have fun.
Combining what I know from personal experience with a one-eyed dog and what I've heard from others about one-eyed horses, I'd say that you'd likely be just fine with a one-eyed horse, and just to be careful around her blind side. She might start being spookier, but hopefully, since it is a slowly-progressing blindness, she will slowly adapt to having one eye and it won't be all too hard on her. She may turn her head to look around while you're riding so she can see, but that's okay. I think her quality of life should be very good. I hope it turns out for the best. I hate to hear that she's going blind, but my grandparents ALSO owned a dog who went completely blind in his later years, and he was a jolly old fellow, and got around just fine!
 

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one of my appaloosas is blind in one eye. I didn't know it when I bought him and the previous owner never mentioned anything. Several months later I happened to meet his original owner and she told me that he had driven a stick into his eye when he was young and the resulting infection left him blind. It has never seemed to bother him. Even my vet didn't realize he was blind until I told him and he checked it out. You certainly can't tell by looking at him and he behaves no differently on one side than the other. When I bought the horse he was being used for English (jumping), western and lessons. I trail ride with him. This summer we are going for 10 days trail riding in North Dakota. Other than my initial freak out after finding out I bought a one eyed horse we have never had a problem.
 
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