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Well, we are basically saying the same thing,When I said to supplement essential fatty acids, it was understood that you would use a source with the correct omega 3 to 6 ration as recommended by equine nutritionists like Dr Lori Warren
Omega 3 is actually high in grass, but fat source,period , is low in hay, thus use supplement a fat source like flax, canola oil or fish oil, which does have high omega3 to 6, but you are supplementing both, in the right amount!
You don't use corn oil or sunflower seeds,(Boss ) as was often done in the past, as they have mainly omega 6

Agree....however the Omega 3 in grass hay disappears quickly although pasture grass is normally high in it. For horses, I prefer whole flax seed because of its anti-inflammatory properties.
 

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Small - but significant fly in ointment re O3... It is a very fragile oil, which is quickly destroyed with processing, heat & sunlight. Therefore, if not using something like whole flax seed, ground daily, oil will need to be cold pressed, kept in a cool place in a lightproof(ie black plastic, dark glass) container & used rather quickly to be any good - ie don't buy a litre at a time, thinking it will last ages. I don't know of any canola oil being processed cold, so generally speaking, I wouldn't count that as an O3 source.

As a matter of fact, most vegetable oils have been greatly processed & heated, and are pretty ****ed bad for you, before they get out of the factory... Cold pressed is also important for people, not just for O3. If you're going to cook with oil, animal fat, such as butter or dripping, or coconut oil, which is about the only known vegie oil to be stable when greatly heated, are far healthier options than 'unsaturated' vegie oils. Worth looking into...
 

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Oats and alfalfa are great complimentary feeds. I wouldn't feed one exclusively but find the combo works. Considering I now have access to a source of non GMO alfalfa and otas are non GMO I am considering going back to basics and ditching the feed mix I am currently using. That was what I started with 30+ years ago and my horses did really well on. Then I partnered with someone that was a firm believer in prepared feeds. It was what I had access to at the time and also worked well but her feed bill was exponentially higher than mine. Since I wasn't footing the feed bill and alfalfa was too expensive to truck in it made sense. I moved here and my DHs ego is tied into the feed bill. The more we spend the better he feels... It's easier to go with the flow and not argue so with the exception of two that have almost never had anything but oats and alfalfa. Those two are still oats/alfalfa/pasture fed and have always done really well. For the rest I feed prepared feeds by age/lifestyle. I find myself switching feeds with this approach instead of just adjusting amounts. ApuetsoT what do you disagree with when it comes to oats? I am curious.
 
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Agree, there is absolutely no reason something needs to be so complicated! Esp for a horse with no issues. Nothing wrong with grain either.
 

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Oats and alfalfa are great complimentary feeds. I wouldn't feed one exclusively but find the combo works. Considering I now have access to a source of non GMO alfalfa and otas are non GMO I am considering going back to basics and ditching the feed mix I am currently using. That was what I started with 30+ years ago and my horses did really well on. Then I partnered with someone that was a firm believer in prepared feeds. It was what I had access to at the time and also worked well but her feed bill was exponentially higher than mine. Since I wasn't footing the feed bill and alfalfa was too expensive to truck in it made sense. I moved here and my DHs ego is tied into the feed bill. The more we spend the better he feels... It's easier to go with the flow and not argue so with the exception of two that have almost never had anything but oats and alfalfa. Those two are still oats/alfalfa/pasture fed and have always done really well. For the rest I feed prepared feeds by age/lifestyle. I find myself switching feeds with this approach instead of just adjusting amounts. ApuetsoT what do you disagree with when it comes to oats? I am curious.
Oats are an unbalanced feed source, as whole foods are by their nature. They also have a higher NSC(but not as high as corn or barley) which may or may not be pertinent to this particular horse. Feeding with Alf does make the Ca:p ratio better. I'd rather feed a prepared ration that has known values in correct amounts.

As an aside, there are no GMO oats on the market and sourcing non GMO has no benefit.
 

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I'm aware that the oats are non gmo as there is no money in it. Makes it nice not to need to source it.
 

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Discussion Starter #27
I'd rather feed a prepared ration that has known values in correct amounts.
This is what I thought as soon as I got out of my paranoid panic state :rolleyes:

I abandoned the customized idea for now and started him on a mash of Purina Equine Senior with hoof supplement (he's shod but I want to try him barefoot this winter) plus alfalfa for now, and then he also gets a whole mess of hay twice a day. I'll see how he does on this and go from there. Might switch to Triple Crown if I can find a place to buy it nearby.
 

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The reason I feed oats as a supplement is what qtrbel said... My pastures are lespedeza, a legume ( like alfalfa). My hay contains quite a bit of it, too. I have not had my hay analyzed, but I only have one horse(out of 13) that anyone could call " not fat". She is in perfect condition.

I have problems feeding horses wheat....it is seriously inflammatory, and causes gut microbiome imbalances. As soon as my horses came off of a wheat based feed, they improved substantially.
 
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