The Horse Forum banner
1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
24 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·

I’m trying to switch my horse over from a happy mouth bit (slightly too thick for his mouth and I’m concerned about it breaking/poking his mouth, leaking plastic type chemicals.)I’ve heard good things about this bit and I would like to give it a try! My horse salivates enough for plastic/rubber bits so I’m not concerned about how he would do with the rubber, he seems to prefer double jointed bits over single jointed so that’s what I like about this plus it being softer than his happy mouth bit. Anyway enough of me talking, any opinions? :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,724 Posts
Best person to ask is your horse! ...it would be great if you could test drive different bits with a horse to see what they like and works best for you without having to buy a dozen, and if you have lots of ancient-history horse pals, you can usually borrow from their collections to experiment.

But if you've already established your horse likes double jointed better and prefers soft feel to metal, this seems like a safe buy. Double check if there's any potential leachable nasties in the presumably synthetic rubber of this bit, just by poking around online with "synthetic rubber toxic chemicals" / "synthetic rubber leaching chemicals" etc. If you find things that concern you, here's an idea: We used to be able to get hollow metal snaffles, rather than solid. They were much lighter in the mouth because weighing less and had some of the good characteristics of a Happy Mouth without potential synthetic chemicals leaching out.

Not everything labelled Eco is safe, sadly...lots of unscrupulous people trying to make a buck. Don't trust the manufacturer, look into the materials it's made from, independently.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Best person to ask is your horse! ...it would be great if you could test drive different bits with a horse to see what they like and works best for you without having to buy a dozen, and if you have lots of ancient-history horse pals, you can usually borrow from their collections to experiment.

But if you've already established your horse likes double jointed better and prefers soft feel to metal, this seems like a safe buy. Double check if there's any potential leachable nasties in the presumably synthetic rubber of this bit, just by poking around online with "synthetic rubber toxic chemicals" / "synthetic rubber leaching chemicals" etc. If you find things that concern you, here's an idea: We used to be able to get hollow metal snaffles, rather than solid. They were much lighter in the mouth because weighing less and had some of the good characteristics of a Happy Mouth without potential synthetic chemicals leaching out.

Not everything labelled Eco is safe, sadly...lots of unscrupulous people trying to make a buck. Don't trust the manufacturer, look into the materials it's made from, independently.
I completely agree, unfortunately I don’t have many friends who have a collection of bits. :/ I’ll definitely check to see what chemicals there might be to be on the safe side! And I’ll also look into the hollow metal snaffles. Thank you for the suggestions I appreciate it!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,145 Posts
Personally, I'm not a fan of rubber just due to how they break down and sometimes end up being too large for the horses mouth.

Have you tried lozenge bits?
I like the ones that lay flat vs vertically.
The lozenge in this one might be too pronounced in particular, but as I've looked around, some are flatter than others. Worth checking out.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
17,451 Posts
I'm not a fan of most rubber bits like this...they are thicker and sadly all I had contact with broke-down from the enzymes of the horses saliva... No thanks to rubber chemical components swallowed.

Why would you look for rubber mouthed and not a finished exterior of metals in various compounds?
Some of those metal compounds do encourage salivation and some do not but few are known to dry a mouth like hard rubber bits can.

These are other options very similar easily found in a google search.
From various metal compounds to create the bit, ergonomics for fitting the bit in the oral cavity, to choosing how you want that lozenge to lay when the bit is engaged....
To me, the heavy of the rubber and not sleeking of what must be carried in a very small groove opening...
There is a reason why so many bits are made in different thickness configurations....proper fit.

I do not like O-rings for the chance of catching a lip edge. I always feel I have to up the size to protect the lips...that can throw off the fit and communication, but that's me.
🐴.... jmo...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I'm not a fan of most rubber bits like this...they are thicker and sadly all I had contact with broke-down from the enzymes of the horses saliva... No thanks to rubber chemical components swallowed.

Why would you look for rubber mouthed and not a finished exterior of metals in various compounds?
Some of those metal compounds do encourage salivation and some do not but few are known to dry a mouth like hard rubber bits can.
View attachment 1133359 View attachment 1133360 View attachment 1133361
These are other options very similar easily found in a google search.
From various metal compounds to create the bit, ergonomics for fitting the bit in the oral cavity, to choosing how you want that lozenge to lay when the bit is engaged....
To me, the heavy of the rubber and not sleeking of what must be carried in a very small groove opening...
There is a reason why so many bits are made in different thickness configurations....proper fit.

I do not like O-rings for the chance of catching a lip edge. I always feel I have to up the size to protect the lips...that can throw off the fit and communication, but that's me.
🐴.... jmo...
The reason I chose this one instead of other rubber bits is because it’s much thinner than the normal rubber bit and it’s made of more natural rubbers so no leaking chemicals, but I completely understand where you’re coming from. My horse has HATED all the metal bits I’ve tried on him (yes I’ve had his teeth checked and floated a little over a week ago) I’ve never used anything with leverage and my hands are soft he just doesn’t seem to like the feel of metal. As soon as I switched him to rubber/plastic he’s done so much better. So I’m not planning on going back to metal for him but I have loved using the metal lozenge bits as you pictured above on my other horses. I always use bit guards when using O-rings so I’m not concerned about pinching. I’m trying to get a feel of different bits for my boy so I appreciate the suggestions and opinions! Thank you! I’ll keep looking around for a better option. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Personally, I'm not a fan of rubber just due to how they break down and sometimes end up being too large for the horses mouth.

Have you tried lozenge bits?
I like the ones that lay flat vs vertically.
The lozenge in this one might be too pronounced in particular, but as I've looked around, some are flatter than others. Worth checking out.
I see what you mean! I have tried lozenge bits just like the one you pictured for him but he just doesn’t vibe with metal I guess, so metal is basically out of the option. :/ I’m going to look around to see if I can find something better for now. Thank you for your suggestions!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,724 Posts
That's a great idea! Convert any bit shape the horse already likes to soft if it prefers. Natural latex doesn't have additives. Some humans have latex allergies but that's something you can try and chances are most won't have a problem with that. So it's back to trying it on the horse and seeing what it says. 😎
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
348 Posts
I’m not a fan of it, horses chew up the rubber so much and then you have to keep buying new ones…the rubber on mine is ripped up and chewed, unless your horse doesn’t chew on the bit, it could work for him. I do know horses that have gone well in it, but it takes a specific horse.
My horse hates all types of metal bits, so I love the bombers classic dee moulded Mullen, and the herm spenger duo D bit, they’re both thiner rubber, which I love.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Looks like we ran into some issues. Please come back and try again later
Top