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Any other pictures? It is really hard to tell anything at all about him with just that photo.
Other information would be good too- what he is used for, what he has done, has he shown, breed, height, any injuries, etc..
just some advice :)
 

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For most people conformation is not the most important thing. What's important is that he is trained well enough for you and he is sound. If you can answer yes to those two things then you should consider buying him.
 

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Do you have permission to critique some one elses horse? I dont want to be rude its just something to think about.

Anways- I think hes cute, pretty and has a very kind face.
 

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I have a couple other pictures but not really good ones. He is an 8 year old registered paint gelding. He has been used for both english and western, I plan to use him english. I saw him go over some small cross rails and he hesitated only slightly just before the jump but I think that was just from inexperience. I don't really plan to jump, but I used to do it and thought if I had a horse that was WILLING, maybe I'd get back into it. I'll most likely never compete, just do it for fun. Oh and he's about 15.2. I rode him this week on wednesday...walk, trot and canter. He did it right off, just leg cues...no spurs, excessive kicking, crop required. Just some leg and he picked right up.
 

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he looks really cute, and i love his markings. How much are they asking for him? He sounds nice.
 

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She told you outright that she was asking 1800 and would take 1500, or is that what you offered? If she said she would take 1500, you might offer 1200. The first thing that I really noticed was the space where between his spine and hip join. The dip shouldn't be THAT prominent, and tends to go hand in hand with a high wither and a slightly longer back, so when he's on flat ground, you're going to have to assess his topline for whatever discipline you're looking to perform. A supplement of MSM/Glucosamine and a good, licensed farrier with proven corrective capabilities can help fix the spacing in the hip, and keep the joint wet.

Next, I noticed he's not too muscled up. His behind and his neck look a little on the skinny side, and you can't see his "rib meat."

Otherwise, he's a pretty little guy, and has a beautiful face, and if he cues from leg, even better!
 

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The dip shouldn't be THAT prominent, and tends to go hand in hand with a high wither and a slightly longer back, so when he's on flat ground, you're going to have to assess his topline for whatever discipline you're looking to perform. A supplement of MSM/Glucosamine and a good, licensed farrier with proven corrective capabilities can help fix the spacing in the hip, and keep the joint wet.

Next, I noticed he's not too muscled up. His behind and his neck look a little on the skinny side, and you can't see his "rib meat."

Otherwise, he's a pretty little guy, and has a beautiful face, and if he cues from leg, even better!
You see that with a lot of QHs as well. Most of it is usually do to youngsters having worked to hard to young and having never build the correct musculature for the job they were asked to do. In some horses if its happend for really extended aount of time(months to years), it becomes a muscle group that is extremely difficult to rebuild. I know of a horse in particular that has it quite severely and tho it doesn't affect his soundness, it's really unattractive.

Have you had a chance to ride this guy?
 

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Such is true. My farrier (35 years experience and continues to take classes) told me that this can also caused by not measuring the horse's angles prior to consistant shoeing, and what he meant was this: some farriers feel that every horse should have a certain angle, and will do anything to the foot to get the angles right. Other farriers will shoe to support the horse's natural angles with the way the horse's bones have naturally grown. Here is a picture of my latest rescue, Moose. He's a pretty heavy-boned, 5yo grade TB gelding, and I had to cake him to get him to get far away enough to take a picture of!

Notice, he has the dip too... and it never affected his soundness either. Just made for an ugly back. I gave him to my farrier's granddaughter, a 13 year old girl in October this year, and they've worked so hard together already that she's got him working back and forth on patterns between barrels and poles, hoping to hit Jr. Rodeos next spring, if all goes well.
 

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