The Horse Forum banner
1 - 1 of 1 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,976 Posts
I had ideas of what my daughter (11 at the time) should have as a first horse. Those ideas went out the window when she got an Arab and they have done amazingly well together. I also had ideas about what kind of horse I should have as a mature rider who wanted something safe. Again, those ideas went out the window after I bought a QH who was supposed to be 100% safe and she threw me over and over again, eventually giving me a concussion. I sold her and bought a barely started 6 year old Appy and it has been nothing but love between us for the last 3.5 years now. My point: sometimes it's not about the breed, but about the individual horse.

That said, I don't think you should be buying a horse after 3 months of lessons. Why? Basically because you have only thus far ridden lesson horses, I assume. Having your own horse will be completely different. This horse will not be a lesson horse and will not patiently deal with all of your ineptitudes as a rider. This is not a personal jab (obviously, since I don't know you and have never seen you ride), this is just the reality. It takes YEARS if not DECADES to become a good rider. I don't think I'm there yet, and I have been riding since I was 5 (I'm 51). You may have great natural ability, but you will still make mistakes. It's best to make those mistakes on lesson horses than on your own personal horse because you can really mess up a horse. Think of it this way: every ride is either training or untraining a horse. It's a lesson horse's job to be forgiving and tolerate mistakes. It does tend to create a lot of bad habits, but that's another topic. You may be very successful on a lesson horse, but I have seen many people think they are great riders because the horse they have been riding is just a really tolerant, obedient, amazing horse that actually compensates for their bad riding. Put them on a horse that is not a school horse, and you have problems immediately. Those riders will blame the horse (why doesn't this horse let me put the bridle on the way my lesson horse did? why doesn't this horse listen to me?), but in fact, it's because they just haven't gotten to a place where they can be effective riders yet. That's fine, we all start somewhere.

You may find that you get tired of riding, that it was only really fun when you were riding a lesson horse that puts up with a lot, and you have not yet had enough experience in the saddle to know what kind of horse you LIKE to ride.

So yes, if you can and really want to have a feeling of ownership, ask about a lease or half-lease. Expect to continue lessons your whole life (I just had one this morning!) and to still feel like you know nothing. Give it a while before you commit to buying.
 
1 - 1 of 1 Posts
Top