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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'll post a video if I get a chance sometime this coming weekend when I go home, but 'till then, I'll do my best to explain it.

She's 15 or so and about 16 hh.

She's lame in her front left. You can obviously see she's in pain when she walks. She's our lead horse and she can't boss around the boys anymore so the pasture's just in an uproar haha.

She's just so stiff. She moves so slow now.

She's not our horse - we're boarding her for the folks down the road. It's supposedly not costing us anything to keep her because they're supposed to be providing us with the money for hay, grain, the farrier, and the vet and they're supposed to do evening feeds. We are NOT a true boarding barn with other clients. It's more or less just us doing a favor for a friend.

What happened was, a few months ago, the horses got out during the evening feed and over the course of their adventure, they ran through some barb wire (it's what the farmers use to separate their fields in our area). Both horses (we didn't have Nick at the time) were cut up pretty bad.

We treated them, of course, and have been watching them. My palomino recovered just fine. But the mare got some sort of an infection in her knee and has been lame for about a month and a half now. The vet came out once and said she couldn't be ridden till spring.

My mom has been giving her bute but we haven't called the vet for her a second time. If she were truly our animal, we would have the vet out again but she's not and it's an odd situation where we've been instructed not to touch her by the owners so my mom giving her bute is kind of going behind their back, but she can't stand to see her suffering.

But ever since she went lame the owners haven't been out to see her at all.

Anyway, I digress. Any thoughts on how to fix it? Is it even fixable? I think the lameness may come from an inflamed tendon or something in her joint.

When the farrier was out last he looked at her and told us that he honestly felt that she was never going to recover from being lame and she'll always be miserable. He advised us to put her down. But of course her owners weren't there and when we told them what he said they didn't even consider it.

I know he's not a vet, but he's been working with horses for forty+ years so he's bound to have picked up on something about them.

Again, I'll post a video if I can in a few days, but until then, anyone have any advice?
 

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She's not our horse - we're boarding her for the folks down the road. It's supposedly not costing us anything to keep her because they're supposed to be providing us with the money for hay, grain, the farrier, and the vet and they're supposed to do evening feeds. We are NOT a true boarding barn with other clients. It's more or less just us doing a favor for a friend.

......
it's an odd situation where we've been instructed not to touch her by the owners so my mom giving her bute is kind of going behind their back, but she can't stand to see her suffering.

But ever since she went lame the owners haven't been out to see her at all.
I agree with the other poster. You need to load this horse up, and take it to the owners. It is their problem and they need to deal with it.

Or, if they have not been reimbursing you for "boarding" her, check your state laws because you may be able to take ownership of the horse to pay for their debt, or sell the horse to pay for their debt (with the hose lame, she isn't worth anything though).

You and your mom are putting yourselves into a sticky situation, as I would assume you do not have a boarding agreement with these "friends" on who pays for what in the event the horse gets hurt.

Again, call the owners and either have them come get their horse, or you go drop the horse off.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
You and your mom are putting yourselves into a sticky situation, as I would assume you do not have a boarding agreement with these "friends" on who pays for what in the event the horse gets hurt.
The agreement we have with them, as far as I know, is that they are to pay every expense related to the care of their horse.
 

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And who was feeding when they escaped, hopefully not you or your mom, as then that blame will be laid on you for liability for vet bills.
Just doesn't sound good all the way around.
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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
And who was feeding when they escaped, hopefully not you or your mom, as then that blame will be laid on you for liability for vet bills.
Just doesn't sound good all the way around.
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It was the father of the family down the street. Apparently he didn't shut the door into the barn or the stall doors during the feeding. I guess the mare ran out and he ran after her and then my horse followed. He called us at 11:30 PM that night and we basically woke up the whole neighborhood and had them out looking for them for 2 hours. In the dark. In strange fields (no one rides in the fields), with dim, dying flashlights.

My dad ended up finding them. They were very spooked and excited. My horse is a pistol to catch. I ended up cornering him next to some barbed wire and sneaked up on him while he was trying to figure out where to go :p But he came like a good boy after I got him.

They both were missing skin and bleeding when we put them in cross ties and began to clean them up. We cleaned their wounds with warm water, applied ointment and put them in their stalls. The wounds didn't look too deep to merit bandaging. We had the vet out the next day and that's when we learned about the whole tendon issue with the mare.

It was a very exciting evening :p And I guess the dad in the other family spent quite a few nights on the couch after that 'cause the mom was not happy with him at all.

But there's the story.

Oh, and I'd like to make it clear that I was not the one who agreed to let them put their horse at our barn. My mom wasn't thrilled with the idea either but they don't have the land for a horse and we have enough to support like 10 horses and we only had the one at the time. My mom's teetering on the edge of kicking them out, actually. She's sick of dealing with them.

The issue isn't with them right now though. We'll deal with that later. We want to get the lame horse taken care of first as horse health and safety are always the first priority with us.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Any ideas as to how to treat her lameness? Anything besides bute?

We've never had a lame horse before. Which is odd since we've had 26 total horses but none have ever gone barreling through barbed wire either so...

Any thoughts on what to give her to help her? Or is she a lost cause?
 

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Your going to need a vet to tell you how to teat the lameness. Giving bute isnt the awnser long term that will cause ulcers. Cant see the horse so hard to say if shes a lost cause or not best bet is get the vet out.
 

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You say the owners have not been out but you didn't say wether you called them and alerted them that there is still a problem. That would be the 1st thing to do. You said it had an infection but didn't mention anything about antibiotics. Just wondering if it was ever properly cared for and I don't think bute is the answer either.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
You say the owners have not been out but you didn't say wether you called them and alerted them that there is still a problem. That would be the 1st thing to do. You said it had an infection but didn't mention anything about antibiotics. Just wondering if it was ever properly cared for and I don't think bute is the answer either.
We did alert them, yes. We're not in a position to treat it though. That's what's odd. They are aware that the animal is lame. They have not requested a vet yet. The vet that did come out was because we called for the scheduled check up.

We've offered to pay for treatment on the condition that they pay us back. They would not be able to pay us back.

My dad went so far as to offer to "put the animal down" as he owns and operates a slaughterhouse. They said no.

I know bute is not the long-term answer. We're at a real loss.

They won't permit us to do anything to help the horse legally. It's on our property - has been for a year and a half. They haven't been to see it in weeks.

Do you see the pickle we're in?
 

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The basic story the way I see it is that the horse has been lame & obviously suffering for some time & isn't being treated appropriately for it. This is neglect, on both the part of the owner and yourselves. The horse needs to be treated appropriately by a vet, or if that's not possible, or the horse is not treatable, it should be put out of it's misery.

So... You need to find out the legalities of all this in your area, but over here, as you are keeping the horse and aware of it's long term suffering, you would be the one legally liable for charges of cruelty & neglect, whether or not the owners would be partly liable or not. If a horse is being seriously neglected by it's owner, then it is the right - and responsibility of the property owner/carer/lessee to do what is required for the animal, or surrender it. I would find out the legalities first, notify the owners of the needs of the horse & that you will be providing them if the owners do not, and sending them the bill, or alternatively that you cannot care for the horse, so the horse will be put down.
 

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Yeah bute long term is not a good option, especially if there is an infection. The vet should be there every step of the healing process since it's an issue of lameness.

Honestly you need to get these people out here to take care of the horse. If they are unable to do so, and the horse needs medical attention, then you have three choices: Call out the vet and bill them, call the vet out and pay out of pocket, or ignore it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I talked to my mother. Apparently there is a $400 vet bill that they haven't paid us back for in regard to the mare.

So she *is* being treated. We're paying for it. My parents aren't happy about the situation. But she is being treated.

I've been away at school so I'm not always all up to date on what's happening at home. But she is receiving treatment.
 
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