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I have 6 wild children. 1 appy, 1 paint, 1 thoroughbred, 1 mustang, and 2 foundation quarter horses
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Update: I have noticed that her biting habit has grown worse, and I'm not quite sure what to do about it. Of course whenever she does it I give her a good bop on the nose, but like I said, it's not getting any better. She still seems to be sore and she walks very stiffly. I know she only got trimmed a week and three days ago, but how much longer until she at least walks normally? Anyways here are the photos I managed to get 馃槉.

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The nipping/biting thing could be a continued pain response. Having her feet trimmed and now at a different angle puts all kinds of new stressed on the tendons, ligaments and joints. It might take a couple of weeks and a couple of trims for the stiffness to go away. She has been walking like that for a long time. I would consult with the vet to see if you can make her a little more comfortable, but the more room she has to walk around and stretch and get to know her "new" feet, the better she will get. She looks amazing. Give her time.
As far as training for the biting issues, I back mine up. If I have a horse in training that is especially mouthy, they go backwards everywhere. From the time I put the halter on until we get whereever we are going. It only takes a little while for them to figure out it's a lot harder to bite than it is to be polite and be able to walk forwards everywhere. lol. I wouldn't do that with a horse that is very sore, but a couple of steps backwards making her use her joints differently may help build new muscles and help her carry herself a little lighter. I always ask for a low head and tucked nose so they are using their muscles instead of going into panic mode. Another horse would make them back up if they are nippy.
Good luck with her. She is so cute and she looks so much happier being able to make new friends and get around a little better. Give her time. The pain isn't gone quite yet.
 

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She still seems to be sore and she walks very stiffly. I know she only got trimmed a week and three days ago, but how much longer until she at least walks normally?
I forgot, did you get XRays? Your trimmer trimmed her overgrown hooves, but if her coffin bone has rotated or descended, she still may be in a lot of pain. It would be really useful information for your trimmer as well, as it might change how they trim her feet.

You could look into hoof boots for her.
 

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Discussion Starter · #43 ·
I forgot, did you get XRays? Your trimmer trimmed her overgrown hooves, but if her coffin bone has rotated or descended, she still may be in a lot of pain. It would be really useful information for your trimmer as well, as it might change how they trim her feet.

You could look into hoof boots for her.
No, we didn't get X-Rays because the farrier said he just didn't need them. I agree though, it might be a good idea to get some done to make sure there isn't anything funky going on inside. Would the coffin bone rotating or descending be a big problem? Is she doomed or is it something that could heal itself over time with some extra help?
 

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According to Pete Ramey, it's fixable. Here's a link to a page on his site. For some reason the pictures are mostly broken for me, but you can also start clicking around on his site to see what he's done with foundered and laminitic horses:
 

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Discussion Starter · #45 ·
Hello! I decided to get her in the round pen today and do some basic exercises: leading, stopping, turning, and backing. She did pretty well, especially for her first time actually working, but we quickly ran into an issue... she will NOT back. Not out of pain or just not being able to do it, I believe she can do it. I'm not sure if she is confused or being defiant. I tried everything, wiggling the lead rope, wiggling it aggressively, tugging on it toward her neck, pushing her neck, pushing her chest, walking towards her, nothing. Absolutely nothing. She wouldn't even shift her weight for me to be able to reward her. She did fine walking and stopping and we're getting the hang of turning, I even introduced the whip, which she absolutely didn't mind. The only reason I wanted to back her is 1. because of the biting issue, and 2. because I want her to know my personal space. Any ideas?

On to problem #2: Finn has become EXTREMELY buddy sour. I took him on a ride this evening and the whole time he was neighing for her, and she was neighing back. 馃槶 He was very distracted and this just gave him another reason to want to come home as fast as possible. He cared nothing more than to come back home to his girl. We already had issues with coming home too fast, so we did what we would normally do, but this time was just ridiculous. And all the noise! What an embarrassment as everyone in the neighborhood came out on their porch to see what the ruckus was. This was his first ride since getting her so I'm hoping it'll get better but I honestly don't know what to do if not. Barn sour, check. Buddy sour, check. Just another issue to add on to the list.

I also noticed the mare throwing her head back with every whinny and whipping her hair around (which was adorable but she screamed like a banshee). Maybe she's in heat? Either way, I'm glad they like each other, but this is just a bit... much. Is there a way I can ease the obsession? I'd hate to have to separate them but I know some people do that with horses like this. I am willing to really work through these issues and hopefully come out on top with two improved horses so I'll take any advice I can get! Has anyone else experienced problems like these? What worked for you?
 

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The thing I used for the backup where it seemed like it really wasn't clear was to make a knuckle out of one finger and push that into the spot / line between the muscles in their chest area. I don't know, it may be a sensitive spot.

Also have you trained a horse before? I forget if you said. You are not, at first, looking for the horse to back up, if it really doesn't understand what you are asking. You are looking for the tiniest shift that says the animal is THINKING about backing up. So even if it just shifts its weight very slightly to its back feet. You want to take that as an attempt. You might even reward just for turning her ears back (not like mare face back, but like "I am thinking about what is behind me" back).

Be sure you are releasing the pressure the moment you get this tiniest bit of a response. Otherwise she won't understand that she's doing what you want.
 

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Before you force the animal make sure the resistance to reverse is not from pain in the hooves and the angles of the feet not being correct. Those legs may just not be capable of going backward without trepidation to the animal.
Your animal still needs a lot of hoof correction done and as that is done how those hooves get placed on the ground will change making it easier to move in all directions.

I would encourage you to get those xrays done so you know, your farrier can see where and how the coffin bone has remodeled with facts so their trimming is most beneficial.
Yes, this may be able to be changed over time, not in 1 - 2 trims, but over a year as bone remodeling takes time to accomplish. And, depending upon what remodeling has occurred, sometimes nothing helps...:cautious:

A good farrier is only as good as the resources he has to work from...in this case those xrays would give him facts seen of what he has inside he is guessing about...
馃惔.... jmo...
 

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Discussion Starter · #48 ·
No, I haven't technically "trained" a horse on my own. I've helped with it and know the process. She'd supposedly been ridden before her feet got bad so I kind of expected her to know a little something here and there but I was just getting my hopes up. I'll let her heal some more before trying that backing and maybe I'll use a rope halter. Like I said, she didn't even shift her weight back so there wasn't much to reward. It might also be good to mention that the whole process is very awkward because she's so short... Lol. I will look into getting those xrays but the farrier insists that he doesn't need them and that it's a "pretty straight forward process". Question: Does she need rest or does she need to be walked daily to further get used to her new feet?
 

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Sorry, the farriers attitude doesn't sit well with me.... :cautious:
You getting xrays can either concrete the farrier knows what he is doing and talking about or show him for what he is...good or bad.
Xrays are a tool for learning from, making maybe become fact.
It does not hurt the horse to have a baseline of what her hooves look like inside as she progresses in being rehabbed.

Honestly, I would get those xrays done first before pushing the animal to hard or far not knowing if there are negative happening or not.
The animal could be playing you a fool, or she could be being a saint in doing what makes her sore but she is a doer and tryer... Till I knew for sure which she is...she gets the benefit of doubt and gentle work, not pushed.

I know a lot of people swear by rope halters.....only if you know what you are doing with it and only if you know how to tie the knot, to adjust the straps properly on the face and where it must sit on the top of the head, where head and neck structure meet...
Does it make a difference? It sure does but many not do the research to understand exactly what that rope should do and can do... It is the handler of that rope who makes it the tool of instruction or not...
Rope halters are also different than a rope halter with knots across the noseband.... and if that is what you are referring to, then you need to really understand how and where those knots need placed...
You are applying pressure to face bones, nasal structures and poll. In reality the top of the skull and top of the cervical bones...you must know what you are doing, please...research first for the animals benefit.
If you leave halters on your animals, this is not the halter to do that with either...

The choices are yours to make.... the outcome of the animals future is in your hands and yours to mold right now too.
馃惔.... jmo...
 
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Sorry, the farriers attitude doesn't sit well with me.... :cautious:
You getting xrays can either concrete the farrier knows what he is doing and talking about or show him for what he is...good or bad.
Xrays are a tool for learning from, making maybe become fact.
It does not hurt the horse to have a baseline of what her hooves look like inside as she progresses in being rehabbed.
Totally agree with this. I can't imagine a farrier saying no to an owner wanting to do x-rays. Especially on a horse that basically had slipper feet. It seems essential to really get a look in there at what's going on after such serious distortion. I would be very uneasy continuing to use a farrier with that attitude.
 

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Since this little mare went threw such an extreme trim she's probably still has pretty sore hooves and tendons/ligaments so this could be why shes not wanting to back up, backing up puts pressure on the areas that would still be sore after the trim. I would give her some more time of healing and let her move around on her own so she can learn how to place her feet now since she dont have all the extra hoof to balance on, let her be a pony before you start schooling her, give her a large area to move around in when she please's. I'm sure its still a bit pain-full to try to back up now having to shift her weight onto her back hooves/hind end.
 

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Walking is highly advisable. For now, I would limit it to just that. Walking forward with limited turning and no backing. You have time, use it wisely!!
Watch her at liberty, if she adds things in then you can also.
 
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