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Ok, this is probably a stupid question - like, a really stupid one - and if you laugh I will not be offended.

Is there any way to encourage horses to poop in certain areas??

I had a super muddy dry lot; knee deep, horrible. My husband and I spent $2000 and an entire weekend to dig it out, lay drainage and gravel it (with the proper gravel). At the time I had a mule and a filly; the filly did whatever the mule did, and the mule only pooped out of the way so they didn't walk through it. It was so easy to clean every day!

Now I've brought back my Arab mare, and she poops EVERYWHERE. THEN RUNS THROUGH IT. I clean the dry lot daily because it will never get that bad again, but my nice firm neat piles are now scattered bits of manure sometimes buried under gravel. I'm doing my best, but it now takes me 3x as long for it to be half as clean as it was.

Is there any way to encourage her to poop somewhere else, maybe off the beaten path so it's not trampled? I know it sounds so stupid, but I figured it was worth a shot. Thanks for any helpful feedback!
 

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I don't think it's a stupid question.

I've heard of people training a horse to go in certain areas by discouraging them from going in any other. They claimed they could spray different things that their horses didn't like. I'll be seeing a friend's who leases paddocks and ask her if she remembers what they used.

Anybody here know?
 

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Not a stupid question. My horse does poop in certain areas naturally. As in...when we free-lunge in her pasture...she will suddenly veer off, go make a pit stop in her manure area, and then continue onward after. Usually horses do this because they don't desire eating near where they poop. And I do feed my mare in her pasture. Perhaps that is something you can use? Place her food wherever you don't want her to poop? You can put hay in a slow-feed hay back, tie it up with baling twine, and flop it on top of a rubber mat or "clean" (as can be) surface.
 

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For those who want to avoid this problem who've not yet bought a horse, stallions are usually lovely and neat in paddocks, leaving their manure in mounds, so you can just pick it up from a couple of piles instead of scattered all over. Some late-gelded horses retain this characteristic to an extent. :cool:
 

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I wonder if using a strong scent, like mare in heat urine, would help? Hunters use it, so you should be able to buy some easily at a hunting supplies store. It would likely get them sniffing the area at least, and maybe it would trigger something...
 

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I am also curious if anyone has any ideas about this. Fortunately, I do not have this issue as my mare is very tidy about where she poops, and refuses to step in it. If I'm riding her through the pasture and we happen upon one of her favorite poop spots, she WILL stop and poop. Even if she doesn't need to poop when we get there, she'll stop and raise her tail. She also goes out of her way to poop into or within a couple feet of the manure pile in the far corner of the pasture as often as possible.
 

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I’ve found that some will always use one spot and others couldn’t care less where they go. I find they’re the same in the stable.
Not sure how much room you have but you could maybe try having a small sacrifice area where you always leave a few piles of manure and see if that attracts the horse to use the same spot all the time?
 

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I'm not sure if it is possible, because I tried for years with an appendix QH that not only consumed groceries at an alarming rate, but scattered the results everywhere and stomped them too.

An overnight stay in the stall resulted in complete deep cleanings nearly every time...

If one has a horse that eats a normal horse amount, and thus makes a normal amount of horsey poo, one can sometimes teach them to be a little more clean, but it is not failsafe...

I have done this with stalled horses, don't know that it translates to outside.

1) start with clean stall, including (if matted) cleaning off the mats with bleach along the front of the stall. Put the water and feed buckets along the front wall, and the hay net in the front corner.

2)After horse poops, place it in the back corner, straight behind the hay net.

3) this is hard to explain, but when cleaning stalls, do not mix up the shavings. Make sure to clean up every bit of manure/urine in the front areas, but continue to leave the poo in the back corner, or at least some of it.

If the horse notices, sometimes they can learn to go only in the back, but some just don't notice or don't care.

IME, stall raised babies are messy, and pasture raised babies are neater.
 

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IME, stall raised babies are messy, and pasture raised babies are neater.
I have noticed this too. At the stable I most recently worked at, we had a pony that had never seen a stall in his life before being bought by the barn owner, and he was incredibly organized and neat both in his stall and in the pasture. (He was also a total butthead that would bust through fences to eat the metabolic ponies' safe starch and then kick anyone who would try to catch him, but that's a different story.) They also had a gelding that was born and raised on their heavy-stall-user farm, and my gosh did I dread cleaning his stall every day. He would also grab any and all items hanging on his door - halter, blanket, lead rope - and drag it into his stall, poop everywhere, and then stomp and mix it all into oblivion, sometimes such a homogenous mixture that we couldn't find his halter at all until we dug for it!
 

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I have noticed this too. At the stable I most recently worked at, we had a pony that had never seen a stall in his life before being bought by the barn owner, and he was incredibly organized and neat both in his stall and in the pasture. (He was also a total butthead that would bust through fences to eat the metabolic ponies' safe starch and then kick anyone who would try to catch him, but that's a different story.) They also had a gelding that was born and raised on their heavy-stall-user farm, and my gosh did I dread cleaning his stall every day. He would also grab any and all items hanging on his door - halter, blanket, lead rope - and drag it into his stall, poop everywhere, and then stomp and mix it all into oblivion, sometimes such a homogenous mixture that we couldn't find his halter at all until we dug for it!
Would guess that stable had a hard time keeping help!
 

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Both of my horses want to poop right where the food is. It's horrible!
Are they outside or inside? Close together?

Sometimes horses "claim" the area but that is usually seen with the occasional gelding peeing on the hay after they have finished with it.

Have seen some horses poop around round bales, but think that is a case of being too lazy to walk away and too piggy to get far from the food.

Had one horse that kept pooping in the water bucket :evil: that was the same Appendix QH but a boarder's mare did it at times too. Yucky
 

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Are they outside or inside? Close together?

Sometimes horses "claim" the area but that is usually seen with the occasional gelding peeing on the hay after they have finished with it.

Have seen some horses poop around round bales, but think that is a case of being too lazy to walk away and too piggy to get far from the food.

Had one horse that kept pooping in the water bucket :evil: that was the same Appendix QH but a boarder's mare did it at times too. Yucky

They are outside, one mare and one gelding. Both poop around their round bale, as well as at their feed buckets!
 

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They are outside, one mare and one gelding. Both poop around their round bale, as well as at their feed buckets!
Try feeding inside in separate stalls, see if they do the same thing. Sounds like they are "claiming" the area.

Gross to eat dropped grain from around feeders!
 

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Try feeding inside in separate stalls, see if they do the same thing. Sounds like they are "claiming" the area.

Gross to eat dropped grain from around feeders!
We don't have stalls, just a run in. For their hard feed, we feed them far apart, but their round bale is in a hay net. Before we got the net, they tore the last bale into shreds in 5 days, pooped in all of it, and would then sleep in it and roll around in it. :eek:
 

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Would guess that stable had a hard time keeping help!
It was a private stable with only six or seven horses so it really wasn't quite that bad. They paid well for menial labor and actually paid their workers to ride and drive their horses, and even paid their workers to lesson with their fantastic trainer! It was a rich old lady's stable who had competitively carriage driven all around the world her whole life. I'm not sure where she got all the money from.

I eventually left not because of the horses, but because the entire place and all the horses had to be absolutely pristine (it's a stable, horses are dirty, what do you expect?) when we left each shift, and it was one person per shift. It was a three to four hour chore just to take care of six horses each morning, let alone the noon and evening. It felt very tedious. The owner would be upset if any of her precious lawn got the lightest footprint on it (thus, we had to walk ourselves and the horses on the pavement all the way around the whole stable to turn out, which took twice as long). I'll never forget how deliriously upset she got when someone got a little bit of mud on the outside of the gator. What do you expect, it's a farm!!
 

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I'm not sure if it is possible, because I tried for years with an appendix QH that not only consumed groceries at an alarming rate, but scattered the results everywhere and stomped them too.
This sounds amazingly similar to some people I know. :p
 

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IME, stall raised babies are messy, and pasture raised babies are neater.
Ice was pasture raised as was cinder. Cinder is the biggest pig in stall. Bring him in over night it's wall to wall poop.
Kicked around stepped in hay mixed in. Biggest bonus is he poops in his water bucket an feed bucket too.
So only enough bedding to barely cover mats. Because it's shovel out entire stall every time he's in stall overnight.

Ice is sometime neat poops In one corner. Other times he poops everywhere.
 
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