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Hello, I am new here to Horse Forum. I would like to know a little more about Paso Fino bosals. I've been looking for a simple bitless noseband attachment, and I had settled on one from Two Horse Tack (purple noseband; picture attatched). This noseband looks to be a beta version of a Paso Fino Bosal, but the only difference is the lack of an extra strap on the rings that go under the chin. The other picture is the chinstrap only, and it is from Kuda Saddlery & Tack; notice the extra strap on the rings. I am curious about the purpose of that extra strap. I know it seems trivial, but sometimes the tiniest differences can matter when it comes to tack! I love to learn new things, so any info is welcome! Also, if I did not attatch the pics correctly, let me know as well, since this is my first post here.
 

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Most Pasos are rather hot or forward. I prefer an English hackamore, or even a Bosal if the horse is trained for it. I probably would not pick either of those. I also like an S hackamore.

Those function almost like sidepulls. I would prefer leather to the beta biothane. Something with a little bit more contact if you need to take up the reins if the horse spooks.
 

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I wonder if the extra strap you see is where the Pisador {lead} attaches to the jaquima?
I know my friend when she bought her Paso tried him at the place there was what looked like a lead shank attached to her bridle...think that was where it was but not positive.

The true name for the Paso bridle part is "the jaquima" and it is similar but also very different than bitless or hackamore riding tack.
I found you a website that might offer a bit more information about the different types of actual nosebands, the fact that each is as individual a matched need to the animal as is any bit...and bits are also spoken of but most people do not need to ride in high spade mouthpieces as our own abilities and that of the animal are not so fine-tuned.
I also found you a visual guide of legal and illegal tack used, shoes and assorted equipment used on Paso horses...
Thought maybe seeing some of the pictures would help you in your choices of what to purchase or not as some things can be downright cruel and not appear it, hence offering a visual display for you to see.

As with any breed of animal...personality and pep in your step is a individual thing.
I've had the pleasure of riding a Paso that was as laid back and quiet to ride as any old nag, but a little leg and ask and a firecracker erupted of go, go, go...
I've also ridden Paso with that "brio" and honestly, it was exhausting to me to sit on a keg of dynamite when all was wanted was a soft, quiet hack to have this go, go, go under me pounding the ground as fast as the feet could go..
The breed though is taught to be fast in movements, the faster and flashier the better and some trainers punish if not enough "brio" is shown constantly.

In any case...
No expert on the tack, but saw many bridles at that barn we had gone to...
Along with the noseband thing was a separate bit hanger and then saw all the horses had a lead rope also hang from their bridle, thought it was from that "loop" on the noseband.

We do have some members with Paso horses who might be able to offer what is the use... @knightrider comes to mind as know she has Paso so called her here to offer more insight.
🐴...
 

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Thanks, @horselovinguy ! I started out using the Paso Fino bridle on Tico because he reared with everything else. It worked really well for him. But, in a few years, he didn't rear anymore and I sold that jaquima. All my other Pasos go beautifully in just a "hackaless" as @phantomhorse13 calls them. I really am no expert at anything. I fake it till I make it.
 

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I do not know what the purpose of the extra strap on the Paso Fino Bosal is, but I have done a bit of riding in a bitless setup like the purple one (with the reins attached to the rings under the chin).

It worked just fine for a horse with a solid neck rein, but if the horse needed a direct rein, it tended to pull the bridle around the face, potentially shifting the cheekpiece into the opposite eye. Not sure what kind of riding your horse does @SwampHorse, but food for thought if you do a lot of direct reining.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I do not know what the purpose of the extra strap on the Paso Fino Bosal is, but I have done a bit of riding in a bitless setup like the purple one (with the reins attached to the rings under the chin).

It worked just fine for a horse with a solid neck rein, but if the horse needed a direct rein, it tended to pull the bridle around the face, potentially shifting the cheekpiece into the opposite eye. Not sure what kind of riding your horse does @SwampHorse, but food for thought if you do a lot of direct reining.
I wonder if the extra strap you see is where the Pisador {lead} attaches to the jaquima?
I know my friend when she bought her Paso tried him at the place there was what looked like a lead shank attached to her bridle...think that was where it was but not positive.

The true name for the Paso bridle part is "the jaquima" and it is similar but also very different than bitless or hackamore riding tack.
I found you a website that might offer a bit more information about the different types of actual nosebands, the fact that each is as individual a matched need to the animal as is any bit...and bits are also spoken of but most people do not need to ride in high spade mouthpieces as our own abilities and that of the animal are not so fine-tuned.
I also found you a visual guide of legal and illegal tack used, shoes and assorted equipment used on Paso horses...
Thought maybe seeing some of the pictures would help you in your choices of what to purchase or not as some things can be downright cruel and not appear it, hence offering a visual display for you to see.

As with any breed of animal...personality and pep in your step is a individual thing.
I've had the pleasure of riding a Paso that was as laid back and quiet to ride as any old nag, but a little leg and ask and a firecracker erupted of go, go, go...
I've also ridden Paso with that "brio" and honestly, it was exhausting to me to sit on a keg of dynamite when all was wanted was a soft, quiet hack to have this go, go, go under me pounding the ground as fast as the feet could go..
The breed though is taught to be fast in movements, the faster and flashier the better and some trainers punish if not enough "brio" is shown constantly.

In any case...
No expert on the tack, but saw many bridles at that barn we had gone to...
Along with the noseband thing was a separate bit hanger and then saw all the horses had a lead rope also hang from their bridle, thought it was from that "loop" on the noseband.

We do have some members with Paso horses who might be able to offer what is the use... @knightrider comes to mind as know she has Paso so called her here to offer more insight.
🐴...
I
I wonder if the extra strap you see is where the Pisador {lead} attaches to the jaquima?
I know my friend when she bought her Paso tried him at the place there was what looked like a lead shank attached to her bridle...think that was where it was but not positive.

The true name for the Paso bridle part is "the jaquima" and it is similar but also very different than bitless or hackamore riding tack.
I found you a website that might offer a bit more information about the different types of actual nosebands, the fact that each is as individual a matched need to the animal as is any bit...and bits are also spoken of but most people do not need to ride in high spade mouthpieces as our own abilities and that of the animal are not so fine-tuned.
I also found you a visual guide of legal and illegal tack used, shoes and assorted equipment used on Paso horses...
Thought maybe seeing some of the pictures would help you in your choices of what to purchase or not as some things can be downright cruel and not appear it, hence offering a visual display for you to see.

As with any breed of animal...personality and pep in your step is a individual thing.
I've had the pleasure of riding a Paso that was as laid back and quiet to ride as any old nag, but a little leg and ask and a firecracker erupted of go, go, go...
I've also ridden Paso with that "brio" and honestly, it was exhausting to me to sit on a keg of dynamite when all was wanted was a soft, quiet hack to have this go, go, go under me pounding the ground as fast as the feet could go..
The breed though is taught to be fast in movements, the faster and flashier the better and some trainers punish if not enough "brio" is shown constantly.

In any case...
No expert on the tack, but saw many bridles at that barn we had gone to...
Along with the noseband thing was a separate bit hanger and then saw all the horses had a lead rope also hang from their bridle, thought it was from that "loop" on the noseband.

We do have some members with Paso horses who might be able to offer what is the use... @knightrider comes to mind as know she has Paso so called her here to offer more insight.
🐴...
I personally don't own a Paso; I was just interested in that style of bridle. I appreciate you taking the time though! And I'll definitely take a look at that link.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I do not know what the purpose of the extra strap on the Paso Fino Bosal is, but I have done a bit of riding in a bitless setup like the purple one (with the reins attached to the rings under the chin).

It worked just fine for a horse with a solid neck rein, but if the horse needed a direct rein, it tended to pull the bridle around the face, potentially shifting the cheekpiece into the opposite eye. Not sure what kind of riding your horse does @SwampHorse, but food for thought if you do a lot of direct reining.
I do direct rein, so thanks for the tip!
 

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One of the Pasos I am training rides really well in a leather version of the purple noseband. However, he is an odd duck... A combination of nervous anxiety and sensitivity. Because he is very sensitive, it works well for him. He tends to be a very responsive horse and if I do need to take a hold of him, I can do so without hurting his mouth. I often ride him with double reins and a snaffle bit so there's an option to use both, with the goal being to teach him to ride in a snaffle with a loose rein.

I believe he was originally trained in that particular device as he rides well in it. Not all horses do because the reins connect under the chin and it uses different pressure points.
 
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