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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Alright. I have two horses, Soulie, a gelding that's retired and living life at a slow pace, who is starting to develop cataracts, and my younger gelding, Cody, who is full of energy.
I've had Soulie for 10 years now and he's been retired since he was 12, as well as he has ALWAYS been the pasture boss. Over the last year I've noticed that he's slowed down a lot. Cody has used this to take advantage of the situation and now pushes him around - pushes him out of his hay (they're fed their hay outside on nice days), picks on him while he's sleeping in the pasture, and generally bullies him. My poor old gelding has no choice but to just stand there and take it. He doesn't actually harm him (biting, kicking etc) he's just very very annoying.
I thought about separating them, but when I do they both just stand at the closest point to their pastures and "talk" to each other. They're lonely if they're not together, but them being together doesn't really work well for Soulie.
What do you guys think? Do you think I should just leave it be and let my old horse take it? Or deal with their separation?
 

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It sounds like to me that they are happier together.
 

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We've got a similar situation, only in ours the older one won't leave the younger one alone. The younger one is very, very, very laid back and quiet, so she just gets harassed and shoved around if the older one feels like it and she doesn't do anything to retaliate or stop it.

So, we divided everything up. Each horse has their own stall and corral, the corrals are separated by a common fence, so if they want to be "together" they can both go over to the fence, or go away from it when they've had enough. Did the same with the pastures for turnout, 2 pastures with a common fence.

Now we do let them be together, just not when both are in heat (both are mares) and not for extended periods of time. So we'll put both of them in the 3rd pasture that's completely separate from everything else for 3-4 hours then separate them so each one has their own pasture for the rest of the afternoon.

Separating them has other benefits as well. We designed the property so each corral has a gate into a pasture so we can leave the gate open and each horse can choose between pasture, corral and stall during the day. Also means that in winter we only need one heated water trough, it's located in the common fencing of the corral, so both horses have water in their corral and during turnout time, they just go into their corral for water.

They do enjoy being together, had a kid leave the gate in between the 2 corrals open and the sillies jammed themselves into the same stall but both horses are happy with some together time and some apart time.
 

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It sounds like it bothers you more than it bothers the old horse. If the young gelding was really bothering him he would put a stop to it. I would just let the be and work it out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
It sounds like it bothers you more than it bothers the old horse. If the young gelding was really bothering him he would put a stop to it. I would just let the be and work it out.
Thanks.. I guess I was kind of thinking the same thing.
When my old horse pushed my young horse around, I didn't care and just got over it. But I guess I baby my old boy far too much hahah
 
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