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They are fun pictures but, in my opinion, not professional,.

The first is just a snap shot. The shadow is taking the eye away from subject. Photographer needed to be the other side, the boat shouldn't be there.

Second one is nothing special, to much surrounding scenery.

Last one is an interesting artistic shot.

A woman who worked with me was a professional photographer and I learned a lot from her. This was way before digital photography! You need to learn about light and dark, backgrounds as well as posing a subject.

Before starting a business, you need to get the correct cameras, lens and printers, a lot of money!

Go to local shows, take hundreds of pictures of competitors on the ring, get them thumbnail printed and display them so people can choose to purchase or not.

I do not think that many would pay you to come to their place and pay for snapshots.
 

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I also like the last one. These are nice pictures, but not professional photography level. You need to think about composition and balance, in addition to what everyone else said. I'm not really a photographer, but looking at the second picture surely you could crop away a lot of the excess and make the picture more focused on the horse and rider. Even then, there is a lot of brush in the front that is distracting. You need to clear it away to make the picture cleaner, or find a better angle. A lot of what nature and animal photographers do, I understand, is spend lots of time finding the exact perfect spot that will help convey what they're trying to convey. First picture is too crowded and is missing something, I'm not sure what.

You might look at taking a photography class. If you really want to become a professional.
 

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I like the pictures but agree with the others. Not to bash your dream but what would you do with an equine photography company? My daughter had her Sr pics taken with her horse. The photographer was not an equine photographer but the pics were great. I don't live in an area with a lot of horse shows or professional riders to an equine photographer would potentially have a hard time finding clients.
 

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thanks you! I am gonna get a better camera once i get paid and take more
IMO, and I will bow out of this after I say this, you would be better off spending the money on a photography class. Getting a better camera won't really make you a better photographer, any more so than getting a better saddle will make you a better rider.

You can actually take really good pictures with less expensive cameras, even phone cameras, but you have to know how.
 

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IMO, and I will bow out of this after I say this, you would be better off spending the money on a photography class. Getting a better camera won't really make you a better photographer, any more so than getting a better saddle will make you a better rider.

You can actually take really good pictures with less expensive cameras, even phone cameras, but you have to know how.
yeah I see what your talking about! I´ve been wanting to try it, but i must learn properly before I even think about anything too extreme
 

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I am a professional photographer. You do need to take a class, and read, and study a lot. You aren't recognizing a good photo yet. I can take a professional looking photo with anything you give me. The equipment is important, but it is your brain that makes you a pro.

Buy a used camera and one decent lens. You can get a 50mm 2.4 lens for a very reasonable price. Spend more on one decent lens than the camera. Now, take that one lens and take about 10,000 pictures. Change everything. Try everything. Move your feet. Take 50 shots of a tree and study what you ended up with. Take 50 more. Go after inanimate objects first. They hold still. Now, take that lens and go for a horse. What works, what didn't. Learn to take what you see with your eye and translate that into a 2 dimensional image that captures what you saw with your 3 dimensional, angle, lighting, and perspective correcting brain. It's hard. And it is worth every moment. Learning to see like a photographer changed how I see everything. It does something to the way your brain chooses what to focus on visually. If you work very hard and take thousands and thousands of pictures (digital photography makes learning affordable-pictures are free, so keep taking them), then you should be able to start charging.

I am going to warn you though. Photography as a business is nearly impossible. Everybody with a camera that has interchangeable lenses thinks they are a photographer. And since everybody thinks their phone selfies are acceptable, they don't want to pay you for your time, your experience, and the skill you have developed so carefully.

I have two cameras that cost 4K each. My favorite lenses cost almost 3K. Each. Now, realize that you are going to take 7K of equipment out into a field and run around getting the best angles and lighting. That's when I take one camera and one lens to a shoot for a horse. And I would be insane not to have it all insured. More money.

Then, I go home and edit for hours on my 4K computer with software that has taken me years to truly use to
maximum potential. Yes, I could get away with a lesser computer, but editing software sucks the life out of a wimpy computer and I have zero patience. No computer can process my editing fast enough for me.

Bottom line, I wore myself out. Many photographers do. So, I went back to my full time job(that I make way more money at anyway), and I have a fantastic time with my photography as a hobby. I will professionally shoot who I want, when I want, and I don't charge my camera batteries for less than $250, which is cheap.

Go to school. Get a skill that you can always count on for paying the bills, then see what you've got to make a living as a creative. 'Starving artist' is a term for a reason.

I am trying to put in some examples of where you will be after a few years, but I don't know how to put in an image. I'll try to figure it out...
 

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Ive been thinking about starting a equine photography company with my good friend. Do these photos look good?

Opinions??

What is your goal of your photography business?
WHO is going to be your customer?
WHAT are you going to sell?


To be completely blunt, I would not pay money for any of the photos you posted. There's nothing special about them. They look like you just took a normal photo from your phone. Nothing wrong with that ..... unless you are looking to get paid!!!


Agree with the others that you actually do not need an expensive camera to get nice professional photos. But you need to KNOW what you are doing.



This is one of my early photos. Quite honestly, I got lucky with the shot and the sunlight was beautiful that morning. I've sold it a decent number of times on a couple stock websites that I submit to, in the past year. I don't truly take the photos with the intention of makin' bank on them. When I see something that inspires me, I take one. I also enjoy taking pictures of other racers when I hit up the barrel races; but so do other people so I haven't sold a lot. But if I can make a few bucks to put toward my own entry fees, great!
 

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