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How do I correct that behavior while he's in a stall ? I watched the video on the forum on how to out in the pen ect which I knew already but not sure I'm doing right in a stall situation..help please. It's as though all the training I put is lost.
 

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I expect it might be useful if you could provide some more information. So he pins his ears at you all the time? You watched a video about dealing with this when he's in a pen -- what did the video recommend and were you able to successfully implement it? How long has this behavior been going on? Has it been escalating? Is it tied to anything specific that you are doing, or anything that's going on outside the area? Has he demonstrated any signs of aggression besides this? Did he do this with his old owners? Do you have a trainer who can help you with him?

People could provide you with a really simple answer, like "get a whip and don't be afraid to use it," but without knowing what else is going on it's hard to know whether it would work. It might possible just make things worse, and end up with you hurt too. Thus more information might be helpful.
 

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So... The stall is his space. I wouldn't worry about pinning ears in his stall if he is not being aggressive. He needs to face you when you enter the stall and he needs to turn towards you when you jiggle the halter but if he's just ear pinny when you feed him or when he's standing in his stall... I personally wouldn't correct it. Mine is really ear pinky when I feed him but he is 100% respectful to me. He doesn't turn his backside towards me and he doesn't threaten me - he just pins his ears and looks mean.
 

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Pinning ears is all about context. If it's in the stall at feed time, I just have them back up away from the feed pan and they aren't allowed to come eat until I say so. I also make them "shake hands" before they can go for the bucket. I stand between them and the feed pan and put my hand out for them to come up. They have to lower their nose and touch my hand, and then I tell them, "Good boy/girl!" and I step away from the bowl. No touch, no food. It only takes a minute for them to learn that and it accomplishes a couple of things. First, it keeps me firmly in the "in charge" seat and, IF they're thinking of trying to buffalo me, it re-focuses them from being a pain to being respectful, very quickly. Kind of like when I was a little kid and taking ballet lessons we all lined up and went up to Herr Trapp (the ballet meister) and we shook hands and gave a curtsy, before and after the lessons. It helped to keep us focused and let us know our place in the greater scheme of things.

If the horse is being aggressive, then I would take them out of the stall, tie them in the grooming bay or cross ties, go in and do what I needed to do and then let them go back in. No point in getting kicked or bitten (not saying that's what he's offering) and that way, I still remain in control and safe and live to have that argument with him another day.

Is the horse truly "pinning" his ears, complete with angry eyes, tight muzzle and nasty attitude?
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Or is it more of in inquiry? "What you doing back there?" kind of look.
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Or is it because the horse doesn't know any better? I have a mare who is deaf and lived her life in a show barn. She LOVES attention and wants you to scratch her. I've noticed that she will frequently "pin" her ears back when I'm standing outside her stall and scratching her bum. She never learned what pinned ears mean in "horse speak" and hers just kind of rotate around and don't really mean what we've all been taught they mean. I've learned to look at her eye, her muzzle, her neck, her shoulder and to watch her feet. If everything stays relaxed, then they're just kind of moving around and don't really mean anything. But if she gets a nasty face or tenses up in her neck and shoulder, I re-focus her real quick. Over time, I've learned she's really a good tempered mare but she needs to spend time out on pasture with a dominant mare or gelding, to teach her how to "speak horse".
 

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Or is it because the horse doesn't know any better? I have a mare who is deaf and lived her life in a show barn. She LOVES attention and wants you to scratch her. I've noticed that she will frequently "pin" her ears back when I'm standing outside her stall and scratching her bum. She never learned what pinned ears mean in "horse speak" and hers just kind of rotate around and don't really mean what we've all been taught they mean. I've learned to look at her eye, her muzzle, her neck, her shoulder and to watch her feet. If everything stays relaxed, then they're just kind of moving around and don't really mean anything. But if she gets a nasty face or tenses up in her neck and shoulder, I re-focus her real quick. Over time, I've learned she's really a good tempered mare but she needs to spend time out on pasture with a dominant mare or gelding, to teach her how to "speak horse".
You know, that's really interesting. I've been working with Pony, trying to figure out nice ways for him to let me know that he wants to be itched (his default was to push the itchy spot into me as hard as he can, like I am a tree, which was obviously not acceptable). The latest thing he's tried is to put his ears back when I'm standing next to him. I didn't understand what this meant the first time he did it. But the second time, I gave him a scratch, and that's what he wanted. He wasn't pinning them, exactly, but he was definitely pointing the backwards. I'm not sure why he thought of doing that when he wanted to be itched, but he did.

But yes, context. It's why I asked for more info in the first place. If this was part of an escalating pattern of actions, it's different than it the horse has always done that. And yes it might not be pinning, it might just be putting them back.

I do let my horses do a lot of stuff that I don't think other people would, but they are never allowed to pin their ears at me. I feel like this is a good clear line that I can draw to let them know who is who in the pecking order.
 

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I loved @Dreamcatcher Arabians post. About having them wait, and 'shake hands'. this is good.
And yes, a bit more info would help us 'see' what's going on.
If a horse is pinning their ears at me without any real reason, I often just dom something that interrupts that thought they are displaying. So, I might do something really small like raise my hand, or pretend to reach into my pocket, or noisily slap my thigh, or hiss at them, or scuffle the ground with my foot. or ? just enough that their natural curiosity kickes in , the ears go forward and that ugly attitude is forgotten for a sec.
 

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I expect it might be useful if you could provide some more information. So he pins his ears at you all the time? You watched a video about dealing with this when he's in a pen -- what did the video recommend and were you able to successfully implement it? How long has this behavior been going on? Has it been escalating? Is it tied to anything specific that you are doing, or anything that's going on outside the area? Has he demonstrated any signs of aggression besides this? Did he do this with his old owners? Do you have a trainer who can help you with him?

People could provide you with a really simple answer, like "get a whip and don't be afraid to use it," but without knowing what else is going on it's hard to know whether it would work. It might possible just make things worse, and end up with you hurt too. Thus more information might be helpfu
I expect it might be useful if you could provide some more information. So he pins his ears at you all the time? You watched a video about dealing with this when he's in a pen -- what did the video recommend and were you able to successfully implement it? How long has this behavior been going on? Has it been escalating? Is it tied to anything specific that you are doing, or anything that's going on outside the area? Has he demonstrated any signs of aggression besides this? Did he do this with his old owners? Do you have a trainer who can help you with him?

People could provide you with a really simple answer, like "get a whip and don't be afraid to use it," but without knowing what else is going on it's hard to know whether it would work. It might possible just make things worse, and end up with you hurt too. Thus more information might be helpful.
Yes because I moved him away from his fellow horses and I built my own barn. I followed the video that was shown on the forum about pinning ears while in the pasture and I tried it. It worked he's now showing Respect.Im with him alot in the day giving him time and direction but he's not happy. I bought all the stuff he could possibly have except another horse. I even buddied him up with my dog. But he still does it showing he's displeased. Never had aggression I think I will be short lived now we have more routine for him here with me being the only one handling him.
 

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He doesn't like to be alone. I do have music on for him. My dog is in the barn to see him in the evenings and day time with always me guiding their interactions.
 

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Some horses are insecure in the stall, and never get over it. Maybe something bad happened in a stall once, and he thinks it may happen again. I make it so all the good things happen in the stall, treats, a nice scratch, and so on.
 

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Some horses just do ears back, and it doesn't mean a thing, period.
Others will tell you you must get him a companion of horse or other animal...horses are herd animals by nature and evolution cause a herd protected and traveled together against predators.
Not me, I get sometimes 1 is all you can do or do none.
The radio thing to me is more a annoyance to the animal who relies on acute hearing to listen for threats to their safety.
I'm not going to say get a costly to keep animal of another equine or even a goat or such but many racehorse barns have chickens used for keeping one company.
I don't know how well it works or not...but you must do what your home, barn/land constraints, financial restrictions and time will allow you to take care of daily. Do not get more animals than you can take care of or afford or want because of others ideas...

I had my horse as a solitary critter as a kid...
My horse did not have a radio to obscure his hearing so he was very aware when I was coming to see him, feed and take care of him...he whinnied a greeting to me long before he saw me he announced he knew I was their for him.
Your dog is great if he spends time with the horse during the day, coming and going and not going after those moving feet as mine do :rolleyes: so are forbidden from in with the horses, ever!

I too do the touch my hand before you can eat thing with my forever acting "food aggressive" ex-rescue...
He doesn't get to eat till he hand touches his muzzle to my palm gently, then he must let me clear out of his way before he dives in his floor feed pan...
Took him 2 days to learn that and it works as my son has found when he didn't do "the trick" and got plowed through and knocked to the floor...My son could of been killed literally as the horse grazed his ribs with hoof {my son is 6'1", not small}.
Don't ever let your guard down especially at feeding time no matter how gentle you think they are....they are still near a 1000 pounds or more of animal with one thought...food and how fast they can get to eat it.

If I need to be in my horses stall with them , my hands are often on them so no forgetting I'm in their with them...and I talk just to make noise so they can follow me if I don't have "touch" happening.
When I must go around them if they are eating, head down, I walk rubbing me to their butt doing what I must...mostly in winter it is blanketing and straightening straps needing to be attached. Bug season I spray them while eating as they are stationary for a bit of time.
For the most part, when my horses are eating I try hard to leave them in peace.
I also try to not pester them in "their space" as the stall is sometimes where they go to be left alone...respect that too.
Sometimes they just want to be left alone and the stall is where that occurs...read those ears and read the body language of your animal to be safest.
🐴...
 

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Thank you everyone for the help, your all so knowledgeable and I'm very thankful for all the help. I think I'm on the right track. Yesterday was a better day.
 

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Without any more information being provided, I feel like it's very possible this horse's behavior is a symptom and not the problem itself. The horse may well be under a lot of emotional strain due to its living situation, and it may be taking it out on whoever is nearby. If it were my horse, while I wouldn't accept this behavior, I'd also try to figure out the root of it and deal with that, rather than just punishing the horse for acting like that.
 
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Without any more information being provided, I feel like it's very possible this horse's behavior is a symptom and not the problem itself. The horse may well be under a lot of emotional strain due to its living situation, and it may be taking it out on whoever is nearby. If it were my horse, while I wouldn't accept this behavior, I'd also try to figure out the root of it and deal with that, rather than just punishing the horse for acting like that.
I agree I've done everything humanly possible. I bought all kinds of things to stimulate his mind and I spend all.my time with him. I think he got too dependent on those at the other barn he was at. I don't always punish him I'm trying to love him always first.
 
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