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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
A lady I know wants to keep this yearling colt as a stud. I have seen way to many stallions out there that needed to never breed. I was wondering what thoughts were out there as to he would make a good stallion or geld him and geld him fast. Thanks for any and all input.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
He is a paint. The owner is a first time horse owner who knows nothing about horses and is getting schooled by another person who is by what I have seen is also clueless about breeding for pedigree, conformation and performance.
 

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Yeesh, her being a first time horse owner is reason enough to geld him.

It's not a great picture, but from what I see it doesn't look like he's anything special anyway, at least not in the sense that he needs to reproduce. Do you know what his pedigree is?
 

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He has some good qualities and could have some potential, but he is way too young to make a stallion decision. If she insists on breeding, which doesn't sound very prudent quite yet from your description, she needs to wait and see how he matures and can determine what his abilities are...
 

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I'd say to get him gelded! He's far from exceptional, and he has a weak loin and back as well as a short neck that ties poorly in to an unremarkable chest. :)
 

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If she is a first time horse owner, there is absolutely no reason that he needs to stay intact and I would never breed one of my mares to him, nor would I recommend someone to breed to him. Absolutely not. If she can't handle regular horses, which takes years and years and years to accomplish, I will never put my mare in her trust for breeding.

I've owned horses for over 10 years and have no desire to have a stallion. I have the knowledge about horses, but stallions are completely different then your nice minded gelding or moody mare.

She's going to get hurt, And she's going to blame the horse for her own stupidity that could easily have been prevented.

The only thing they are seeing on him is color and dollar signs because of it. If you don't know anything about genetics, pedigree and horses in general, you have no place to even go near a stud.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 · (Edited)
Looking at pedigree, he is a backyard breeder baby. Thank you all for your posts. It helps to hear comments from other people. I know some things when it comes to conformation so I get to learn more hearing your comments. I knew looking at him he was one horse that definitely needs to not reproduce.
 

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He looks ok, nothing stands out to me. Only way I would even think about keeping him intact is if his parents were proven producers and/or his parents had winning show records in some sort of discipline. If that were the case, and he didn't have any "wow" factor to me as a coming up 2 yr old, he would be a gelding. I certainly wouldn't want to produce anymore mouths to feed that wouldn't make me money or cause me more work.
 
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To be fair, the picture is at a less than ideal angle, the horse is in his "winter woolies", and he's still in his "teenage" phase. I wouldn't make a call just yet about how good or bad he is.

That said, if he's this lady's first horse... I would advise VERY strongly that she get him gelded.
 

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Most colts should be gelded. Most fillies should never be exposed to a stallion. This colt should be gelded.

Years ago when I was in the AQHA the statistics were there was 1 intact stallion registered for every 1.6 mares (or something equally as amazing). Geld Geld Geld......

Only the proven best should be used for breeding. Proven either in the ring or doing actual real work. Progeny are proof too.. and if they are weak in spite of a stellar stallion who is proven, Geld Geld Geld.
 

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I may have missed something. I didn't see where she wanted to use him for breeding, just keep him a stallion. I just love it when people who have nothing invested try to talk someone into doing something-the old control thing when there is no solid reasoning behind it. Perhaps clue her in of how hormonal and unpredictable stallions can get and downright dangerous for a novice owner. Most boarding barns won't take them.
 
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