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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just realized last week that we don't have any polo wraps. I'd like to have some on hand, just in case. I went to Amazon to see what they had, and I see widely varying prices, and some brands that I've never heard of. What I'm wondering is, is this one of those areas where it's worth it to spend more money because I'd get a better quality product, or does it not really matter and they are all pretty much the same?
 

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Be sure it is polo wraps you need. There is a difference between polo wraps and standing wraps. That’s probably one of the differences in price and material you see.


There is also a correct way and an incorrect way to put them on a horse.

Which, it’s a good thing there are vet videos on YouTube because I a. More left-handed and than right-handed and would have wrapped everything backward when Joker had tendon issues eight years ago.
 

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I get mine from Tackeria in Florida or King's. I do believe there is a difference in quality. I've groomed for long-time polo players who've had some for decades.

What I do find curious is that some say to never wash them. Just brush off any dirt or manure once dried. Others wash frequently. I wash by hand and hang to dry.
 

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Polo wraps are often thought to be used as the outer bandage of stable wraps by some...not!

There are differences in quality, in stretch and thickness which offer the protection as forum member "boots" would know and made mention of from a mallet going bong on a cannon bone or leg in some location.
I've also seen different lengths mentioned and of course for horse or pony and now I even see for minis.

If you don't truly know how to wrap a polo, don't.
There is no room for error
with polos as you are directly on the leg tissues..
Pull, twist, apply uneven pressure and you may have a issue serious enough you just stall-bound your horse for weeks if not months and can also leave a permanent blemish to the leg.
Polo unless done by the most experienced and highly trained offer protection from bangs but minimal support to the leg structures. The skill level of the person applying makes a huge difference in effective or not
Read up on, do you really want to polo and why before not after making those investments in products.
And like everything else horse, marketing and advertising campaign do have much to do with costs associated to certain products and the hype of you must have and do or you are a bad equestrian...rubbish. :rolleyes:
Be informed, be wary and honestly, know your limitations in what you really can do so you not injure your horse. :(
🐴...
jmo..
 

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——-
If you don't truly know how to wrap a polo, don't.

There is no room for error
with polos as you are directly on the leg tissues..

Pull, twist, apply uneven pressure and you may have a issue serious enough you just stall-bound your horse for weeks if not months and can also leave a permanent blemish to the leg.

Polo unless done by the most experienced and highly trained offer protection from bangs but minimal support to the leg structures. The skill level of the person applying makes a huge difference in effective or not

Read up on, do you really want to polo and why before not after making those investments in products.

And like everything else horse, marketing and advertising campaign do have much to do with costs associated to certain products and the hype of you must have and do or you are a bad equestrian...rubbish. :rolleyes:

Be informed, be wary and honestly, know your limitations in what you really can do so you not injure your horse. :(
🐴...
jmo..
HLG is not “just whistlin’ Dixie“ — especially this^^^^^.

In all my years of owning horses, I never had to wrap a leg - never - not even with all the hard trail riding I did, not even when I hauled my horses cross-country 2,100 miles twice.

When Joker foundered in 2012, ”THAT loser certified farrier did not follow the lameness vet’s instructions and the result was torn tendons on both front legs. The lameness vet was so enraged when he saw the ultrasounds, his face literally turned purple.

He showed me how to wrap Joker’s legs, being adamant about wrapping them in the correct direction and not too tight.

It was a whirlwind moment of instruction in the middle of a moment of a crisis and I did not totally get what the vet said. It was a good thing some wonderful vet posted a YouTube video slowly showing how to correctly wrap.

**
part of my point is — with what you do with your horses, it is not likely you need to wrap their legs for anything, not even when you move them to Oregon.

the other part is to further impress what I said in my post above and what HLG said — wrapping has to be done correctly. This is one of those “if it works don’t worry about it” things, unless you get instructions from a vet — not a trainer but a vet:)
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
But if something were to happen and I needed them and didn't have them, that would be bad, wouldn't it?

I wouldn't use them except under the direct guidance of someone who knew what they were doing --you guys have scared me straight LOL!-- but what if I needed them and didn't have them? Wouldn't it be better to have them on hand just in case?
 

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But if something were to happen and I needed them and didn't have them, that would be bad, wouldn't it?

I wouldn't use them except under the direct guidance of someone who knew what they were doing --you guys have scared me straight LOL!-- but what if I needed them and didn't have them? Wouldn't it be better to have them on hand just in case?
Yes. Have them on hand.

Here is a very good veterinarian demonstrating how to correctly apply wraps for everyday use.

 

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Invest in protective boots, like a splint boot or bell boot, but if you don't know what you are doing wrapping then don't.

More damage is done often by someone in a panic situation that rushes and worsens than ...
If the horse is bleeding, apply direct pressure with clean gauze as you assess the injury.
Your post makes me think you are panicking already...that is not the time to bring out equipment you are not well versed in using...
Using so much you can and have done wrapping in pitch blackness all by feel...

What is so critical you would be putting polo bandages on?
Are you sure you are not meaning stable bandages...like you see racehorses step off of transport trailers/trucks at racetracks wearing?
Those are not polos but standing, stable or shipping wraps...quilts/cottons and outer bandages and again you need to know what you are doing or do serious damage...
Racehorses do not wear polos, but exercise bandages and those are another of if you have not had direct hands-on training don't, please please don't.
Polos are what people often put on because it is a fad, not for any other reason and often I cringe at the mess of knotted, rumpled, not evenly applied and obviously pulled tension in the wrong location...oh please don't.
If you have that kind of issue you are panic'd to thinking you must wrap call your vet for emergent care first and ask for direction of what can I do till you get here...
Often cold gentle hosing is most beneficial for lacerations to keep out or flush debris, to keep swelling reduced till qualified help arrives on scene..
If you don't know how to check or clean debris out/away, leave it alone...and if you attempt watch your skull cause a injured animal lashes out in fear of more hurt...keep your wits about you and others away from the animal.

Sorry I don't agree you can learn and do because you watched some vet in a video with years of experience, hundreds of legs wrapped and the education behind him to know if you pull in the wrong place you just...well, I'm just saying you better learn from someone who truly knows what they are doing.
That video is a nice, beautiful wrap job now tell me why and what crisis took place you are going to have a injured horse stand quietly, weight bearing straight on his legs, no blood or contaminants are you sealing in to the injury site...sorry, just no.
🐴 ...
 

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This was January, 2013 - it took 11 months to rehab Joker to where he could go back to pasture with the other horses.

those are standing wraps with quilts. Under the quilts is Sore-no-more clay poultice with vet wrap to keep it in place.

Every piece of material on those legs had to be wrapped in the correct direction and with the correct tension.

 

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Vet wrap and cotton. Cotton wrapping that is disposable or cotton leg pads that can be washed. That buys you time. Even then though you must. Must, know how to wrap correctly. If you feel you must cover legs for a long trip then shipping boots. If you know your horse stocks up with restricted movement and will be in a small restricted space with no turn out over long periods just rest stops then learn to wrap now and practice. And if they'd is a current emergency forget the wrap and call the vet.
 

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But if something were to happen and I needed them and didn't have them, that would be bad, wouldn't it?

I wouldn't use them except under the direct guidance of someone who knew what they were doing --you guys have scared me straight LOL!-- but what if I needed them and didn't have them? Wouldn't it be better to have them on hand just in case?
I could have sworn I just replied to this then edited to ad and all disappeared. If you needed them then I promise someone will have something. I always keep a set of washable pads and cotton wrap plus vet wrap. That doesn't get you out of the you must, must know what you are doing when wrapping though.
 

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I didn’t have anything when I needed it for Joker. The vet wrapped Joker initially and I was to leave that alone for three days before I had to take over, so that gave me three days to gather stuff.

I was able to buy standing wraps at TSC but they did not have washable quilts andI wanted washable quilts.

Fortunately Bedford Tack is only 15 miles away, caters to the Walking Horse/English crowd, so they had every kind of leg quilt known to mankind available.

I told them why I needed the quilts and who the vet was. They set me up with exactly what I needed - for which I was grateful:)

The poultice ended up being the big deal. I had a bad allergic reaction to the stuff the vet left for me. I ended up ordering Sore-no-more clay poultice, which the vet ok’d.

I needed a poultice that could be covered with wraps - not all of them can, so that is something else to be mindful of.
 
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Definitely clarify of you are talking about wraps for riding or wraps for injuries.

Polos are used for riding. They have a lot of stretch typically. They dont do anything important enough they you need them, "just in case". They are for appearances and minor protection.

Track wraps/standing wraps are for injuries/trailering/stabling. These have very little stretch to them. You also want to have quilts or pillow wraps underneath them.

And yes to having to know what you are doing to wrap them. I've wrapped countless times. I've had vets praise my wrapping. Yet I still managed to give my horse minor bandage bows across the front of his hind legs several years ago.
 
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