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Discussion Starter #1
just brought home a new gelding and he is very swollen at the back end of his sheath. is it possible he could have a bean and it is causing inflamation. Any one seen anything like this 1458423_10201430973309854_748591508_n.jpg
 

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Often this swelling can be caused by fly bites.
Usually if they have a bean, when they pee instead of a single stream it is more sprinkled.
 

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Agree could well be from a bite - ticks especially will cause a nasty swelling in some horses
The 'bean' is more likely to cause difficulty urinating
Did he not have it when you viewed him at wherever he came from?
 

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Discussion Starter #4
no he did have it, they had not noticed it till i pointed it out and were not sure of what it was either. they are not very experienced owners. If it is a flea bite is there anything I can do for him
 

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Horses do not get fleas!
Fly bites. LOL.
You can get some Neem Oil, stinky stuff but it does a good job of keeping flies away.
 

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Using KY jelly on your hand, go up into the sack and clean it out. Have clean rinse water nearby for rinsing your hand then reapply the jelly.
 

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It is edema. Are you keeping him in a stall and he was used to being turned out? Turn him out where he can and will move around and recheck in 24 hours. Or ride him for about 45 minutes and check him. Some geldings do this just like some horses will stock up in their legs when stalled.
 

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You can read the full article at Why And How Do I Clean My Horse’s Sheath? - AAEP but here is a snippet..

Myth #3: Swelling in the sheath and tail rubbing are signs that a horse’s sheath needs cleaning. When a sheath swells, it has nothing to do with the accumulation of smegma inside it. -Because of its location on the underside of the horse, it is simply a natural low point where excess fluid is drawn by the force of gravity. For example, an older horse with low protein levels in his blood or liver disease may experience fluid buildup, called edema or pitting edema—swelling that holds a depression when you press into it with your thumb—in the sheath area without exhibiting any other clinical signs. In such cases, the swelling likely will disappear if the horse is turned out or exercised, just as it would from the legs of a horse who stocks up when stalled for long periods of time.

Another common cause of sheath swelling is parasites. Parasites also make horses’ tails itchy. So if you notice your horse rubbing his tail and he has a swollen sheath, the latter condition isn’t causing the former. Both can be cured by deworming with an ivermectin-containing product.
 

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flies and parasites. put some swat on the outside of the swelling, after hosing with cool water.
be careful to not get kicked, some geldings are uncooperative when messing with the sheaths.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
ok i do not believe this is flea nor flys as we live in michigan and it's too cold for either. I have only had this horse for 3 days. He had this when I brought him home and he was not stalled other than overnight. He is let out everyday. And at my home he is never stalled he has free run to paddock and stall. If it is a bean and he needs to be cleaned will this do the trick or will he need vet assistance.
 
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