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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I may be purchasing a horse. I'm looking for a horse that can be my friend, in a way. I enjoy the small tasks such as grooming, petting, even cleaning stalls, and my focus isn't just riding. I want to build a relationship. Yes, I want to be able to ride the horse. But nothing serious, I won't be competing, I won't be riding 24/7. Just casually, and I like to trail ride. I also ride English and have never ridden Western before, although I would be open to doing such. I would say my level is experienced beginner or a beginner-intermediate. I've been riding horses off and on for 10 years (lessons, leasing, etc.). Nothing too advanced. I also don't want to spend a boat load of cash for my horse, either. Maybe up to $2000? I'm not exactly sure.

With all this in mind... I thought I would post some links to horses I am finding in my area and get some opinions from more experience folks on here?

To start, I've found two horses on CL.
#1: Gorgeous dun quarter horse gelding
#2: Beautiful Palomino Walking Horse- Video
 

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Another place you might consider looking for horses is local rescues. I know I work with one here in WA that has great horses of all levels for adoption, who have all been vetted, rehabbed and re-trained where necessary and in general they are around $1,000 to adopt. I'm sure there are rescues in your area, you might want to check them out :)

Just make sure that you find evidence that they are a valid, reputable rescue, with the horses' best interests involved. Just like with dog and cat rescues, there are some bad apples out there unfortunately :-(
 

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I don't see either add advertising as "beginner safe". In regards to the second add, have you ever ridden a gaited horse before? And 4 seems a little to young. 7 is even pretty young.
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Another place you might consider looking for horses is local rescues. I know I work with one here in WA that has great horses of all levels for adoption, who have all been vetted, rehabbed and re-trained where necessary and in general they are around $1,000 to adopt. I'm sure there are rescues in your area, you might want to check them out :)

Just make sure that you find evidence that they are a valid, reputable rescue, with the horses' best interests involved. Just like with dog and cat rescues, there are some bad apples out there unfortunately :-(
There are a few rescue horses but because of my inexperience I'm afraid they won't allow me to adopt. What do you think?

I don't see either add advertising as "beginner safe". In regards to the second add, have you ever ridden a gaited horse before? And 4 seems a little to young. 7 is even pretty young.
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Nope! I haven't! Thanks so much for pointing that out. I do not want a gaited horse.
 

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I would run from both of these if I was you.

The first one:
First of all it is not a dun to my knowledge and I'm not sure how a horse can be a dun/ bay. Whilst this is not necessarily a problem with the horse, I question their understanding of horses slightly (but that is just me).

Mainly they don't mention it is beginner safe. A VERY important statement to look for when you're are a beginner, yes this does not necessarily mean it is true, but you have a much higher likelihood.

finally they describe this horse very much like a pet, 'he is a big pet' that would send up flags to me that he is a bit spoilt and hasn't learnt boundaries (again an assumption)

The second one:
It is 4 years old which is in my opinion not appropriate for a beginner. Yes the ae the extremely rare cases of naturally dead broke acting 4 year olds tht is incredibly rare.

Also you say you can only ride English yet he is wearing a western sadle so you would have to train him in english which is not great for a beginner.


I suggest you enlist the help of an expert if possible to help your search.
I would be looking for a 9+year old that's main selling point is good beginner horse. Then specifically good on trails, out alone, not spooky, good to trailer, groom and for the farier and one with no health issues. With your price range I would suggest an older horse, tht you could promise a forever home to (very appealing to sellers) as you say you enjoy the other intimate parts of horse ownership, this also increases the chances they might be more beginner friendly (though not always!)

Happy hunting!
 

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There are a few rescue horses but because of my inexperience I'm afraid they won't allow me to adopt. What do you think?
It really depends on the rescue. I know the one I work with requires a year of riding experience, which it sounds like you have? if you've been off and on for 10 years, I guess it would come down to how much you've been on :wink:
 

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You said you had taken lessons. Will you be working with a trainer with the new horse? If so i would ask them to help you find a horse or go with you to see horses. I don't think the first horse sounds that bad and to me it would be worth talking to the owners and seeing if he would be suitable for a beginner. It would definitely be best if you can find someone with more experience to go with you to view any prospective horses.

And I actually do think he may be a bay dun (which is a bay horse with a dun gene). That dorsal is pretty crisp for countershading.
 

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I would run from both of these if I was you.

The first one:
First of all it is not a dun to my knowledge and I'm not sure how a horse can be a dun/ bay. Whilst this is not necessarily a problem with the horse, I question their understanding of horses slightly (but that is just me).

Mainly they don't mention it is beginner safe. A VERY important statement to look for when you're are a beginner, yes this does not necessarily mean it is true, but you have a much higher likelihood.

finally they describe this horse very much like a pet, 'he is a big pet' that would send up flags to me that he is a bit spoilt and hasn't learnt boundaries (again an assumption)

The second one:
It is 4 years old which is in my opinion not appropriate for a beginner. Yes the ae the extremely rare cases of naturally dead broke acting 4 year olds tht is incredibly rare.

Also you say you can only ride English yet he is wearing a western sadle so you would have to train him in english which is not great for a beginner.


I suggest you enlist the help of an expert if possible to help your search.
I would be looking for a 9+year old that's main selling point is good beginner horse. Then specifically good on trails, out alone, not spooky, good to trailer, groom and for the farier and one with no health issues. With your price range I would suggest an older horse, tht you could promise a forever home to (very appealing to sellers) as you say you enjoy the other intimate parts of horse ownership, this also increases the chances they might be more beginner friendly (though not always!)

Happy hunting!
Actually there is bay dun, it's what most people consider a normal dun. Like a red dun is sorrel with the dun gene, bay dun would be bay with the dun gene. Also grulla, a black horse with the dun gene.

To the OP, just because most horses can physically handle trail riding didn't mean they are all mentally suited for it. You want a horse with no spook, and to be beginner safe to be your main priority.

Good luck :)
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Actually there is bay dun, it's what most people consider a normal dun. Like a red dun is sorrel with the dun gene, bay dun would be bay with the dun gene. Also grulla, a black horse with the dun gene.

To the OP, just because most horses can physically handle trail riding didn't mean they are all mentally suited for it. You want a horse with no spook, and to be beginner safe to be your main priority.

Good luck :)
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Never new that! Learn something new everyday indeed!
 

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I would look for an older horse for you. Maybe something 15-20 years old. 20 may sound old, but there are plenty of horses that are 20 and still riding daily at that age. Because you want to spend most of your time bonding with your horse and only ride occasionally, I would definitely look for something higher up in years.

You are certainly likely to learn more from an older horse who has seen everything, been there done that, rather than a young one that is still learning themselves.

Also, definitely get a PPE done, so I would include that in your over-all budget.
 

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ok, some things I recommend to all beginner ish riders;

1)get someone experienced to help you, that knows what you want and will tell when a horse is wrong for you. then write out a list of things you must have, and things you would like to have, vs things you will not have. read the "buying a horse" thread(its somewhere on this site). then get the experienced person to read it over. It might read something like:
MUST have

-Well broke, beginner safe
-quiet temperament, not spooky or reactive
-no buck, bolt, rear, barn sour, buddy sour horses.
-good ground manners, easy to handle, good with feet, no kicking, striking, biting.
-experienced on the trails.
- under 15.2hh
- trailers well
-sound

WANTS

-stocky build
-certain color
-mare
-registered
-no cribbers

CAN NOT have

-buck, bolt rear
-kick, biting, striking
-pushy on the ground
-spooky
-over 15.2hh
-soundness issues

you get the idea. stick to the list. don't look at horses that are missing must have qualities or that have 'can not have' qualities. at all.

2)don't rush, you have time. always look at more than one. don't buy from sellers you get a bad feeling off of, or are inconsistent with their info. if you go to see a 15.2hh paint, and you see a 14.1hh pony , be wary of the seller.

3)stick to your list and don't let the seller push you around. don't fall for the "other buyers are coming to see him", or "we've had lots of inquiries". If they are pushy, I suggest backing up a bit and taking a second look.

4) vet, vet, vet!! its very easy these days for a seller to drug a horse, or lie to a buyer. get a good vet check, and not with the sellers vet.

and most importantly LOOK WITH YOUR HEAD, NOT YOUR HEART. Don't fall in love with a horse until it has past your list, your experienced friends judgment and a thorough vet check.
 

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I agree with the other posters that you should enlist a professional to help you. Many of them will charge a small commission fee (usually 10-15%, depending on your area) but it is absolutely worth it. They can help you find a horse that suits your needs, and they typically have a bigger arsenal of horses of look through (through other trainers, word of mouth, etcetera).

Where will you be keeping your new addition? Beginners should really work with a trainer, as even the most well broke horse can develop bad habits.

Just a couple of things to keep in mind ;)
 

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I like the look of the first one and it seems like he might be rather experienced in spite of his younger age. Do you have a trainer/instructor or an experienced horse friend that you would trust to go with you to check out these horses?

I think the first one is at least worth a look, though I wouldn't advise something as young as the second for an inexperienced rider who is looking for a trustworthy horse to take on occasional trail rides.
 

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Remember that it's important to visit a horse at least twice before you decide to contact a vet for a pre-purchase exam. You may find that the horse was perfectly behaved on the first visit, and on the second he tests your boundaries, or something to that effect. It also helps to have someone with extensive horse knowledge to accompany you and take pictures/video of you riding, so you get a good idea of what the horse looks like under saddle. I also ask the owners to ride so I can watch.

If at any point a seller tries to rush your decision or questions your desire to visit a few times before making a decision, it's probably a good idea to look elsewhere.

Good luck!
 
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