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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Here is a lovely video on how it's ridden and thought.


I only learned this existed at all online, no one mentioned it in classes and I've never seen it used - non horsey country so maybe that's why.

But I've rarely seen it mentioned on this forum and it seems that a lot of people don't know it's a thing.

I tried it (as per video above) and it wasn't particularly difficult to do - more fluid than posting the trot, at least for me.
My mare also enjoyed it, she got quite in tune with me and responded well to my rating. And I am not an amazing rider either, I feel like most people would be able to do it after they get their balance solid and leg firm.

So, what gives?
 

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I was taught the rising/posting canter when i was a child. It's not something I use very often though. Tended to use it more when we were tired and had been working in the canter for a long time, whether it was on on a hack or x-country. It helps with stiffness, balance and rhythm. I agree it can be easier than the rising trot.
 

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You're right! It's a great tool for rating a horse.

I learned it in polo and use it on any horse I'm riding. Other than polo riders, I've seen some riders schooling horses for cross country jumping use the technique between fences.

Thanks for sharing the video.
 

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She relates it to getting into the "polo stance" - being ready to get well out of the saddle at a canter. I suspect stirrup length is also a driver. The longer the stirrup, the more your hips are pulled toward the withers. The shorter the stirrup, the more your hips are forced to the rear. At a canter, the horse's back pivots around the withers - so the further back you sit, the more vertical rise the horse's back will make under you.


Not an English rider, but I think the main reason I sit is because I enjoy sitting the canter - feeling the flowing motion and moving with it. I two point in a trot all the time. It lets me avoid the up/down shock of a big trot. But a canter already feels smooth and fluid to me. I've cantered in a two point often enough...and just don't see much added value to it.

But I'll try posting a canter sometime soon and see what I think. Maybe more important, see what BANDIT thinks of it! If he likes it, we might start doing it regularly!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
She relates it to getting into the "polo stance" - being ready to get well out of the saddle at a canter. I suspect stirrup length is also a driver. The longer the stirrup, the more your hips are pulled toward the withers. The shorter the stirrup, the more your hips are forced to the rear. At a canter, the horse's back pivots around the withers - so the further back you sit, the more vertical rise the horse's back will make under you.


Not an English rider, but I think the main reason I sit is because I enjoy sitting the canter - feeling the flowing motion and moving with it. I two point in a trot all the time. It lets me avoid the up/down shock of a big trot. But a canter already feels smooth and fluid to me. I've cantered in a two point often enough...and just don't see much added value to it.

But I'll try posting a canter sometime soon and see what I think. Maybe more important, see what BANDIT thinks of it! If he likes it, we might start doing it regularly!
I think it may also help at a faster, more energetic pace - those polo riders sure don't hang about :)
 

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Looks like it's a polo thing and that's probably why it's not really par for the course in the more wide reaching disciplines. I believe I've heard of posting the canter in passing but I come from a dressage background so my discipline niche is much more narrow and wouldn't really see this being used. But I say, hey, if it works for you go for it!
 

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I ride English. When I was first learning to canter, I did most of it in two point or posting. I liked posting the canter more than two point canter. I think it was because I was particularly terrible at finding the rhythm of the canter and my seat was quite bouncy when I did sit it. Then I took a 7 month break from riding, and recently just started back. Just tried canter on my last lesson, and went into sitting (no two point or posting) and found the rhythm straight away (for the first time ever). Will see if it sticks, but maybe a break was good for me.
 

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I learned to post the canter as a child during lessons. Really haven't used it since. My riding horses are smooth and comfortable at the canter. Just nice to sit and enjoy the ride. I have no need for it, I suppose.
 

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I used it when training green ones in show jumping, and the approach into grids before 2 point. I was taught in the riding school that I started at and when I went to and at pony club.
 

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so, you go up with the leading front leg, hover one beat, then down. H m m . . . so if up with front leg at canter, that is sort of the last beat of the canter series, IF you consider the strike off of the outside rear as the number ONE of the 3 beat series.


when the front inside leg (let's say right for these purposes) is leading, it's reaching well forward, and the horse is in it's most downhill orientation. As the front right leg is reaching foward, the rear left is leaving the ground, The front lands, that left rear reaches forward, hits the ground and lifts the entire horse into the air, so for a sec, all weight is on that rear leg., This is when the horse is in the most 'uphill' orientation. Would you be still standing at this point?

then, when both the right rear, and left front hit the ground in unison, is when you sit down into the saddle?


I think I'm not getting this right. Please chime in if you have things more clearly.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
so, you go up with the leading front leg, hover one beat, then down. H m m . . . so if up with front leg at canter, that is sort of the last beat of the canter series, IF you consider the strike off of the outside rear as the number ONE of the 3 beat series.


when the front inside leg (let's say right for these purposes) is leading, it's reaching well forward, and the horse is in it's most downhill orientation. As the front right leg is reaching foward, the rear left is leaving the ground, The front lands, that left rear reaches forward, hits the ground and lifts the entire horse into the air, so for a sec, all weight is on that rear leg., This is when the horse is in the most 'uphill' orientation. Would you be still standing at this point?

then, when both the right rear, and left front hit the ground in unison, is when you sit down into the saddle?


I think I'm not getting this right. Please chime in if you have things more clearly.
I am not sure of the bio-mechanics, but I don't think you can get the rhythm wrong, like the lady in the video says. The horse just throws you up at the right time. I didn't fall out of rhythm. I think it would be very obvious if one did.

I think one can get the position of the body "wrong", but seeing that I don't need to whack a ball with a mullet I only paid a little bit of attention to it. I'll give it a bit more work next time.
 

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@tinyliny - think about the lead foreleg for this. Up when it's forward.

I found a video with a quiet rider posting the canter. The focus of the video is leads, but there is good footage of her posting.

 

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@Tinyliny - up for a stride, down for a stride. Up when the front right is forward, down the next time the right leg is forward, up the next... It helps if you slow the video to 0.25.
 
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