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Discussion Starter #1
I'm pretty keen on this little colt. He's only 6 weeks old. Friesian wb. Dam is homozygous pinto, Sire is imported friesian.
Critique in regards to dressage please. He apparently has a lovely temperament for his age, very easy to do anything with, takes everything in his stride.
Rather pricey though!











 

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What kind of pinto is the mare?

I have a Friesian sporthorse colt myself, coming two this year, so I'm keen on the breed--but the problem is that the mares sometimes are really shoddy and although the babies look great, ALL babies look like they just float over the ground. The mare is VERY VERY important. If she has stock horse blood (APHA, 'unknown' pinto, or QH), most definitely pass. They just don't blend well for a sporthorse prospect.

He has a slopey hind end for me that I don't really like (it's the most important part!), and a short neck, but it's hard to tell anything else without conformation shots.
 

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The mare is a bit of a mixed bag. She has tb, warmblood and australian stock horse (I am a big fan of aussie stock horses, they are usually built beautifully!). I have asked for some conformation shots of both mare and foal which I am waiting on, and also video of the foal.
 

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I actually ride APHA paints, and I love the QH/stock horses. Great guys.

But they just don't mix well with this breed; the babies look cute and they grow up a little awkward. If it's only a little bit I wouldn't worry much. ;)

Try to get a video of the mare/stallion. The baby's gonna look great--but if the mom has a choppy/flat hunter stride, there's a darn good chance the baby will end up with it. They don't keep the movement they have as babies!

Depending on how serious in dressage you want to be, you have to see how the stallion moves and was bred. There are 'sport horse models' in the friesian world, and then there is the traditional breed standard which have a park-cart horse type movement. Very pretty--terrible canters and what the German's would call 'leg movers'--they tense their back. You don't want to be starting out with all the cards against you!
 

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Discussion Starter #5
The mare has quite a flat trot but a fairly nice canter. Both her parents had really lovely loose movement so unfortunately she didn't inherit that. The sire has a beautifull trot and canter, not so carthorsey at all, he is much more a riding type. The stallions sire is also bred as a sport horse (pure friesian) and is competing in US dressage as far as I know.
He does have a lovely back on him, but I'm going to try and hassle for video too. I'm also about to look at the video of mare and foal moving when he was only 2 1/2 weeks, but she's going to send me more of him from now.
I am ideally wanting to go as far as i can in dressage, at least to advanced on my next horse so yes, I do need something that isn't all legs and has an abilty for collection.
 

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i dont know alot about dressage.
But i have to say, he is absolutely STUNNING!
i think his movement looks rather good.
Nice long legs *i like that*
At his age though, it is hard for a critique, especially just being little, if you look at photos of the dam, and sire you will see maybe what his confirmation will be like, but there is no absolute gaurantee.

I think he will be rather lovely in the show ring.
Let me know if you get him <3
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Ok just saw the video of him at 2 1/2 weeks. Eh, maybe for AU$4500, but definately not 8k. Just not good enough behind for my liking, he's very straight behind and mum has really flat movement.
 

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Don't worry, you'll find one. It took me forever to find my boy, but I absolutely love him. If you're looking for something trainable and affectionate, the friesians can't be beat! My boy gets it from his mother's side, and at two years old and still intact, he is an absolute doll. ;)

I know a ton of Friesian cross breeders here--wish I could help in your area!
 

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i work at a riding school, and stud where we breed friesian warmbloods, breed from every type of mare you can think of, and if they are the right quaility np matter what breed they magnificent foals...
 

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Sorry, that's not the way breeding works. ;) You can breed two gorgeous horses and end up with a really awkward baby--there's nothing special about friesians that allows them to skip over this breeding fact.
 

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so then why do you say that a friesian qh cross or stock horse x wont work out for what she wants? it could come out looking like a full on friesian for all you know...
 

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Horses with stock blood tend to have lower set necks, shorter legs, and flatter--or choppy, if race bred--gaits. This is very different from a friesian, and more often then not, the babies tend to look like a puzzle incorrectly pieced together. They are bred for very different disciplines and jobs.

You give the baby the best possible chance to have good conformation for the job he's going to do, so you breed like-parents together for a common goal. Obviously, if you breed a stock/Friesian, you have a MUCH MUCH smaller chance of getting a good dressage foal then if you breed something that is in line with friesian conformation and the discipline you want to compete in!
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Horses with stock blood tend to have lower set necks, shorter legs, and flatter--or choppy, if race bred--gaits. This is very different from a friesian, and more often then not, the babies tend to look like a puzzle incorrectly pieced together. They are bred for very different disciplines and jobs.

You give the baby the best possible chance to have good conformation for the job he's going to do, so you breed like-parents together for a common goal. Obviously, if you breed a stock/Friesian, you have a MUCH MUCH smaller chance of getting a good dressage foal then if you breed something that is in line with friesian conformation and the discipline you want to compete in!
Exactly why I took the cautious aproach with this guy. I've been looking for over a year now, and still havent come across anything that really grabs me. A few I've come close to buying, but they've failed a pre purchase check or after seeing more footage I've decided against it.

As said above, just because the stallion is a friesian doesn't mean the foal is going to be stunning no matter what mare you put it to. This is again the backyard breeder saga, chuck a snazzy stallion over a really average mare, you're not necessarily going to get a spectacular baby just because dad is nice.

I'm most definately NOT going to be jumping into a purchase just because it 'looks pretty' and has a fancy sire. Definately not!! I've worked too hard to earn my pennies, there is no way I'm going to buy something unless I'm 100% convinced it's going to be what I want, at least that way you can slightly minimise the risks of buying a youngster. And with the level of dressage that I'm wanting to have this horse reach, it has absolutely GOT to be the right type for me.
 

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I'm glad to hear that!! :D Are you looking specifically at Friesian crosses, or 'whatever can do the job'?
 

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I have a friend that recently purchased a Fresian/Pinto filly from a specialty breeder. She is absolutely stunning and has the best movement you can imagine. she's going to grow up to be quite the dressage horse!

I think he's gorgeous, for the record :)
 

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My boy has the best mind in the world... and he's a stud!

I am completely sold on this breed, I think ;)
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Oh dear I'm being slight re-convinced by him. I got the new video of him today... he's nice, hocks are so much better!!! Hmmmmmmm don't know what to do now, thinking it's time to run the video's by my coach and see what she thinks hmmmm decisions decisions!
 

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Haha! If you don't think he's worth their asking price, nine times out of ten, they'll have to lower it because no one ELSE will think he's worth that. So offer them lower, or sit on him for a while and see if they get the bright idea to lower it themselves. I got my boy for 5,500US here.

Make sure the hocks aren't really 'lifty' and trailing out behind! The one thing I love about my boy is that the hocks don't spend all this stupid time up in the air, bent--they spend the important time bending on the ground. The hocks can get 'flashy' without ever thrusting and getting the impulsion you need, so watch for that! And remember that his movement will be CONSTANTLY changing. That's why they say the parents are your best indicator of the baby's movement when he's full grown. (I personally have seen many 'springy' babies grow up to be gorgeous hunter horses).

If you're curious (And who doesn't love baby pictures!), here's my guy when we looked at him:





And him now:




(Best confo shot I have at the moment! Or world is covered in snow!)

 
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