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Hello,

I'm new to this forum and joined because I've come into an interesting situation.

I've been riding, training and learning from horses for over ten years. As with many on this site, I suspect, horses molded who I am and fulfill my life in a unique way.

The stable I was educated at is in California. I now live in Idaho and have an opportunity to buy -for very cheap- the horse from that stable that I formed a very close bond with. The horse, Bigs, has some anxiety/trust issues and isn't a great fit for a lesson stable but he and I have always got along really well. He trusts me and working with him brings me a deep sense of peace and happiness.

So, that's the good side. I've graduated college and am looking for the right graduate school situation. In the meantime, my job changes. Currently, I have a job for a year and am comfortable financially. Certainly not excessively. I am trying to decide if I can incorporate my horse soulmate into my life, financially etc. If it was any other horse I would say no because it isn't the most practical decision. But my heart wants him desperately. And I could make it work, potentially.

I would really appreciate people's experience of owning a horse before they were settled somewhere permanently. Additionally, if anyone on here has owned a horse in Idaho, what were your expenses like? I have a loose idea based on my area but would welcome extra insight.

Thanks,
Jen
 

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I've never owned a horse and not had a permanent place to call home, but I've seen many military families try to do it and either they succeed or fail miserably.
Horses like stability, and if you are not settled in one place for more than a few months can cause schedule conflict that could become a very big problem. Typically this involves changing work hours or having to work on the house/ residence. Not to mention school can throw curve balls that you'd never expect.

Idaho has some pretty harsh winters, if the horse is not used to winters like that it can be a shock to their system. You'll need to buy a good bit of hay for the winter and you may wind up having to confine the horse to a small stall for long periods of time unless you have a way to provide turnout that is safe.

All in all the decision is wholly yours, only you will know what is best for you and the horse. :)
 

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It depends on what part of idaho. I am in the Boise area. We have pretty calm winters, hot summers. Board ranges from 250-500 a month in my area for full care, or you can find pastures to rent for about 50 a month. Buy hay early, too many people wait until last minute when hay prices are hiked up before winter. Owning a horse in idaho is pretty easy.
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I'm far from stable and I have a horse. I usually move about every six month, sometimes a couple of hours away, sometimes further. The last move, at the beginning of this year, I moved to a town I'd never been to and had to bring my horse over on a twelve hour boat trip. In the next month or two we'll be moving again, with another boat trip back and moving to a place I've probably never been to.

It's pretty easy, and it's not too hard on the horse. However, mine is pretty quiet and confident, frequent moving with a horse with anxiety issues might not be great.

I don't think you need to be particularly settled to have a horse, so long as you commit to that horse's care. Life throws you curve balls, and you never know what tomorrow brings. So if you really want something, don't let the fear of the future put you off too much.

Expenses are a concern though. I've always done it fairly cheaply, but that means making choices about my lifestyle.
 

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Show horses travel to new barns all the time. As long as a horse gets fed, most don't care where they are.

I prefer stability in my own life, however. I personally wouldn't consider purchasing a horse if I didn't KNOW where I'd be living the next few years, have a job I expected to be in long term, have an emergency fund for myself and my horse, and know where my horse would be living. Even as a college-degreed professional adult in a two-income household, I was super cautious about buying my horse, lol. There will always be another "perfect" horse out there if you look hard enough, so be careful about letting your heart do the deciding when your head should do so.

This decision is all about YOUR comfort level right NOW. Good luck deciding!!
 
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