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My horse, Captain, is a 33 year old Arabian. During the last two to three weeks he has had several stumbles resulting in abrasions and cuts on both sides of his rump. On Christmas day, he must have had a bad tumble because he did something to his right front leg. I could see that it was very weak and he could not fully extend it when going forward. He was examined by his doctor who thought he had pulled a muscle, possibly in the neck just above the point of shoulder. I was advised to keep him stabled on a flat surface, but his stumbling continues slightly. Has anyone ever had this situation with a horse. How can I determine where the weakness is located. I can push his knee and it is easily pushed back and forth. I don't know if the weakness is in the knee, shoulder or neck area.

Can anyone help me with the old man? I hate to see him go through this because he is one of the family. We have been together for 28 years.

Thanks
 

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WELCOME to the Forum...


With a time frame of several weeks witnessing stumbling and gait changes, soreness....
I would absolutely call back the vet for a exam and possible diagnostics done...
Something has changed and your horse is in advanced age which can also add other issues to the equation of what if and what is this about..........
Call the vet...

Good luck in uncovering and healing the issue at hand.
:runninghorse2:...
jmo...
 

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It could be that he's dragging a foot. At his age, his vision could have gone without you noticing. Is he on any supplements or arthritis medication? I added selenium and vitamin E to my 35 year olds diet and saw a pretty big change. Mine is also on bute...

The vet should probably come out to take a look. Hopefully it's nothing neurological.
 
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Unfortunately, usually with a horse that age habitual stumbling is my sign to retire them from riding. Arthritis, aging related weakness, vision changes, can all be contributing. Keep his feet and teeth done, keep weight on him as best you can and give him lots of love. The vets' advice about level ground is good too. Watch him for signs of difficulty lying down or getting up, he may need assistance. But at 33 he's definitely no longer able to safely carry a rider. I've seen elderly senior horses trip and go down to their knees with a rider in a soft flat arena setting. That's no fun for anyone.
 
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