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Problem with spoiled horse.

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I recently purchased a 7 year old mare that has been allowed to do whatever she wants for the past 2 years at least. When previous owner was riding her and Gypsy was done the horse would go to the steps on her own and owner would get off. I don't work this way. I took her outside for a ride and she decided we were done. I said no and lightly slapped her with the end of the rains to go and she started bucking. She has done this while being lunged also. Where do I start to retrain her.
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Let her buck (on the lunge) and then get her going. Don't make her work load suddenly huge compared to before, but make sure it IS longer than when she thinks it should stop. Also, some horses will buck if you slap them on the flank or rump, but will accept a correction without bucking if you slap them on the shoulder. Afterall, the slap comes after one nice 'ask' with your heel or ankle, and one firm 'ask', then slap, slap! brisk and firm! not tentative . Be ready for her to react. Hold one rein firm so she can't throw her head down and REALLY buck.
 

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Considering she has been ridden differently in the past, it's your job to help her understand what you're asking. She may need some re-training, which takes patience. When you slapped her with the reins, she probably didn't understand. Praise her when she does good.
What did she do to 'decide' you guys were done? Did she just stop dead in her tracks & didn't want to move? How so? Need more specifics.

I would work with her on the ground first, get her used to you. Develop a relationship with her.
 

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Since she is new to you, it would be a good idea to introduce the idea that things will be different gradually. Quite possibly, she has not been exposed to things like being slapped with reins if her owner was overly gentle, and you may have spooked her.

I'd begin with very light corrections with your legs or reins to see what she will listen to without overreacting, and I'd say since your first response was bucking you are being too quick or loud in your style and should back it down some. Your light slap might be very startling if a horse has never been exposed to that sound or feeling in the past.
 

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I have no use for lunging once a horse is trained. I think it creates a bad attitude in many horses. When I rescued my late Amal, the director of the shelter told me she had sent him to a trainer who used him to check his cattle every morning. The first two times we went out on the trail, after a couple of miles, Amal was done. Time to go home. Urging him to go forward only resulted in him objecting and backing into the brush and under the limbs of trees, or whatever he could find. I turned his head all the way to my knee and let him know I wasn't releasing him until he got with the program. If I released him, urge him to go forward and he started backing up again, I would bend his head again. When he behaved, I praised him. After the first two rides, he was done with that silliness.
 

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Ages ago, we leased a stallion for breeding. This horse was a rope horse, super broke, just a good soul. However he did have one problem. When he thought he'd done enough for the day, he'd lay down on you. Did you know it IS possible to pick up a horse by the belly with your spurs? Yep, I did it. He got the "point" and was more than happy to get back on his feet, and we finished what we needed to do. He'd been let get away with this for far too long.
I should add, he never tried it again with me.
All I'm saying is its up to you to not let this behavior go on. Whatever you need to do to get it thru to them that they're not done yet, that's what you need to do. Like this stallion, I didn't kill him with my spurs, but he got my message, we're not done.
It might be as easy as just turning the horse around and heading out again. But be firm, this is an area where you cannot allow them to dictate to you that they are done.
 

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Since you just got him, and depending on the horse’s personality maybe you should avoid a confrontation straight away and try and go about it differently. If the horse isn’t a dominant type and is just confused about new rules - I would trick him. If you can figure out when this “clocking off” time is close maybe try asking for something completely new and unusual. Ground poles, cones and small jumps are your best bet. It could well be that he is just bored and he’s telling you this. Keep his brain busy and he will not be able to think about quitting. (I am a pest on this forum with my ground poles and cones but it truly works for a huge number of issues).
 

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I said no and lightly slapped her with the end of the rains to go and she started bucking.
Neither of these things may have meant anything to the mare. Saying "no" to a horse is a waste of time. She's not a dog or a child.
Lightly slapping her with the reins may have been a bit too confrontational for her and she chose to fight back with the bucking.
Next time, turn her to get her "unstuck" and use leg and voice to urge her on. When she moves forward, reward her by stopping the leg pressure and voice. If she stops, start turning, using leg, and using voice again. She moves forward...release all pressure and voice. She stops...repeat the process. Eventually, you need to stop her BEFORE it's her idea to stop. Then get off and give her a pat and put her up. Good girl.
Also, maybe carry a crop or dressage whip if your leg needs back-up. She may still buck, but I always feel like swatting them with the reins carries with it the risk of grabbing them in the mouth while trying to force them forward, which results in a ticked-off horse in many cases. Can't blame 'em.
 
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