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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am wondering.....when my percheron was shod, I remember her standing very uncomfortably, shifting her weight back and fourth, while her shoes were off, while the farrier was making her new ones. I remember noticing how much her frogs stuck out further than the hoof wall and sole itself. I figured that was because he cut the walls/sole short, so when he would put her shoe on, the frog would still touch the ground.

My mare is now barefoot and wears boots when needed. I don't notice it as prolapsed now. But there still is a little of it rasped away when her heels are brought down because of it's height.

I'm wondering if this fixes itself over time, or would this be a tim to actually trim it?
 

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Sometimes when we trim to put on shoes, we will create a slight prolapsed frog so that it can still be close enough to the ground to get some stimulation to help prevent atrophy.

It sounds to me like her frogs are in a good place - we want them to touch the ground and be level with the heels if possible. This allows her to use the back of her foot to activate the frog and digital cushion to support the bony column of the limb.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Sometimes when we trim to put on shoes, we will create a slight prolapsed frog so that it can still be close enough to the ground to get some stimulation to help prevent atrophy.

It sounds to me like her frogs are in a good place - we want them to touch the ground and be level with the heels if possible. This allows her to use the back of her foot to activate the frog and digital cushion to support the bony column of the limb.
Thanks Rialto....I figured that was what it was.
 

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I will leave extra frog when I shoe to insure the frog is on the ground so temporarily as I have the shoes off and am fitting new ones. The horse may be a little uncomfortable while standing there waiting . Sometimes I will put the bare foot on a foam pad while I am at the anvil shaping the shoes.

'However SOME horses have been shod badly in the past with no frog support and thick shoes and their frogs prolapse past the heels until they reach the ground. It is especially an issue in weak footed thoroughbred types (not so likely in a Percheron) . That is not a healthy situation because the frog sank,(taking the back of the coffin bone downward with it) and mis-aligns the joint inside.
In those cases adding artificial frog support to the shoeing is very helpful. Or barefoot will eventually just mash the frog back up into the foot where it belongs. But it can make a painful transition to barefoot. .

Here are two different kinds of frogs that extend beyond the heels prior to the shoe being set. ..the first is weak, thin , flattened ,prolapsed and could not be trimmed if I had wanted to because it would draw blood. It is a very weak foot.

The other is is one I just left plenty of extra healthy frog so after the shoe was put on the frog could still be on the ground. See how it is not all squashed? Either way it sounds like your farrier was understanding the importance of getting the frog on the ground and if so good for him.
 

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