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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Recently bought a 3 y/o OTTB. When doing any sort of work, he tucks his hind end up and is not moving and using himself properly. (we figured that this is why his connections could no longer get him into the starting gate at the races and i have no idea how he even raced in this condition) After being examined by a vet, we came to the conclusion that he had pulled his psoas muscles. He was treated with shockwave and we were told to get him going over poles to encourage him to actually step under himself.
This is the first time I have ever dealt with and heard of this problem. Has anyone else experienced this? What was your rehab journey like?
 

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I'm not sure I understand what you mean by "tucks his hind end up ". Could you post a photo of something like that?
Isn't the psoas muscle the one that is used to contract the abdomin? like, for example, how the horse sort of contracts the stomach, and it appears that his back is shortening and widening, when he is pooping?
 

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The psoas runs (basically) from the lumbar vertebrae to the closest end of the femur.

I'll trust that your vet diagnosed it correctly.

I like getting them to move at different speeds at the walk and trot. I probably wouldn't being working on tight (10 m) circles for a couple weeks, but just getting him stretched and moving smoothly. Shockwave therapy is like any other. It increases circulation to the targeted area. Don't worry if you aren't doing daily or 3 times a week shockwave.

I also manually stretch the hindlegs. Forward, under himself, and out to the back. I do both hind legs, even if the injury primarily affects one side.

I hope your horse recovers soon.
 

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Recently bought a 3 y/o OTTB. When doing any sort of work, he tucks his hind end up and is not moving and using himself properly. (we figured that this is why his connections could no longer get him into the starting gate at the races and i have no idea how he even raced in this condition) After being examined by a vet, we came to the conclusion that he had pulled his psoas muscles.

The in red tells a mountain of information...

A 3 year old...already injured since he moves in such a way...
Was a full lameness exam done?
Was blocking of troubled areas done and did you ever get the horse to move out soundly using himself correctly?
Shock-wave is wonderful therapy and speeds along the healing, but you need to also realize there was a reason why it happened in the first-place and that reason is what dictates where you treat and what you treat...
Why does the vet think .... and not .... would of been my questions. What is/was the underlying cause of the injury and are we prone to it recurring as is common.

A nice article about the PSOAS Theory to read..makes understanding less overwhelming.
https://www.equinetransevatech.com/psoas-theory
:runninghorse2:...
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
found this to be rather passive aggressive..
I was looking for others who have experienced rehabbing this type of injury.
a 3 year old off the track already injured really comes at no surprise...

"but you need to also realize there was a reason why it happened in the first-place and that reason is what dictates where you treat and what you treat..." my vet, my trainer, and I all know exactly why this happened, like I stated earlier, it was concluded that the horse pulled his psoas. Therefore, the horse was treated with shockwave on his psoas muscles and given stretches and exercises to work on everyday.

"Why does the vet think .... and not .... would of been my questions. What is/was the underlying cause of the injury" The vet knows and this was not something he "thinks" is going on. Once again we already know the underlying cause.
 

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In reference to horse loving guy’s comments, I believe she was looking for more info. Information is key to doing a proper analysis of any situation and developing a workable solution. The fact the muscle was pulled is the end result, what is missing is why it was pulled to begin with. What I mean by that is, for example, I pull a muscle on me. If I am merely walking from the house to the barn and it happens that is much more concerning than if a I fell off the barn roof and did it. The cause of the latter damage is understandable, expected and can be avoided in future; the cause of the former damage is random and shouldn’t happen if my body is functioning as it should implying I may, at worst, not be able to do certain activities in the future if I can’t get it corrected.

So, to your horse — do you know how it actually happened? Did a certain activity bring it on suddenly? Was it a gradual build up of minor incidents?
 

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a good example at what they are trying to get at is my gelding odie. vet thought he injured his neck and thats why he was suddenly so nurologic he could not walk. said he was probably a head shaker from a neck injury. lets NOT look at the fact he has been a consistent head shaker for 3 years (he is 12) but he did have epsiodes at 2 years old... almost got put down. but a CHIRO of all things fixed him right up. his head shakers caused him to throw his neck, shoulders, spine AND pelvis WAY out. my fiance and i knew his head shaking had to throw something out. so a chiro was a good go to insead of expensive neck and spine x rays. end result was the same. he could not feel his feet. the treatment is what the difference would be. instead of possible surgery or what not on his neck we need to look into treatment for his head shakers.

Did he injure himself if a fall? or from hitting a gate or being ran too much. each sanario would dictate on how the injury was caused and a potential way to fix it correctly without causing further issues.

that said id look into read light therapy and acupuncture.
 
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